Page 30

2014 Winter Linfield Magazine

Stephen “Vaughn” Hamby ’81 of Eugene, July 20. Norma (Messmer) Shannon ’87 of Keizer, Dec. 7. Bruce Assily ’00 of Honolulu, Hawaii, Jan. 24. GSH Anita (Johnson) McKee ’55 of Sedro Woolley, Wash., July 20. Friends and family Calvin Cabe of McMinnville, Jan. 7, former chair and longtime volunteer for Partners-in-Progress. Survivors include son Gary Cabe ’72. Tim Cheney of Dickinson, N.D., Feb. 9, professor of business at Linfield, 1984-99. Donna Laughlin of McMinnville, Jan. 20. She retired from the Linfield accounts payable department in 1995. Dorothy Pinard of Steilacoom, Wash., Oct. 31, former Linfield College trustee, 1989-96. Theodore J. “T.J.” Day ’71 Theodore J. “T.J.” Day ’71 of Reno, Nev., whose passion and commitment to Linfield transformed the college, passed away Jan. 23. For more than 40 years, Day was an energetic advocate for student educational experiences inside and outside the classroom. He and his wife, Debbie, made many substantial contributions to Linfield, and successfully encouraged 3 0 - l i n f i e l d m a g a z i n e Winter 2014 others to join with them in philanthropic support. Projects that added immeasurably to the college include the renovation of Riley and Walker Halls and Michelbook House, construction of the Rutschman Field House, and creation of the Nicholson Library and Vivian A. Bull Music Center, which was part of the college’s expansion to property previously owned by Hewlett-Packard, now known as the Keck Campus. Day was instrumental in securing the largest single corporate and foundation gifts the college had ever received to acquire and renovate that property. In recognition of the monumental impact that Day had on Linfield College, the Board of Trustees in 2010 unanimously approved the renaming of the renovated Northup Hall to T.J. Day Hall in his honor. Day, who made his home in Reno, Nev., had a very successful career in real estate and natural resources development. He credited Linfield for getting him ahead of the curve academically, and he completed two master’s degrees at Stanford. He had served on the Linfield Board of Trustees since 1972 in numerous capacities including vice chair. Day was also a member of the board of directors for many companies and organizations, including the W.M. Keck Foundation and the Willametta K. Day Foundation. He was honored numerous times for community service, including being named Linfield’s distinguished alumnus in 2011. Linfield President Thomas Hellie said that Day’s experience with the institution and his insight into business and higher education helped shape Linfield’s future. He called Day one of the college’s greatest supporters and a loyal friend. More comfortable in jeans and boots than a business suit, Day was reticent to talk about himself. But he was incredibly generous with his time and resources for organizations and programs in which he believed. Day willingly gave of his time, his business savvy and his resources. “His big heart, his infectious laugh and his passion and deep affection for Linfield will be greatly missed,” said David Haugeberg, chair of the board of trustees. Nils Lou Nils Lou, professor of art at Linfield, passed away on Dec. 25. A celebration of life was held in his honor at Linfield Feb. 18. Lou was known as an artist, teacher, golf coach, and beloved and playful spirit. He joined the Linfield faculty as an adjunct in 1984. In 1987, he was hired as an assistant professor of art and served as the department’s chair from 1987-1990. He was the director of the Renshaw Gallery from 1990- 1997. During his career at Linfield, Lou received both the Edith Green Distinguished Professorship Award and the Samuel H. Graf Faculty Achievement Award. Lou was recognized as a leading expert in kiln construction in general and wood firing techniques in particular. His book, The Art of Firing: A Manual for a Studio Potter, remains one of the most significant source books on the topic. He is credited with designing the Minnesota Flat Top Kiln, a kiln construction that remains in widespread use throughout the United States and abroad. He was also one of the founders of the East Creek Anagama Kiln. His presence remains on campus through several works of art he produced, including paintings on display in Nicholson Library and Walker Hall. Lou also designed the Linfield College Mace, used for ceremonial occasions such as commencement, and designed the sundial on the exterior of Graf Hall that honors the late Winthrop Dolan. Lou’s art is in such prestigious collections as the Kanto Gakuin University (Yokohama, Japan); Kremlin Collection of American Art (Moscow, Russia); Walker Art Center (Minneapolis, Minn.); University of Michigan (Ann Arbor, Mich.); and the National Museum of Art (San Jose, Costa Rica), to name a very few. He was an active and engaged professor, who had published and exhibited his work in more than 200 exhibitions during his career. He received numerous awards and recognitions, including two grants from the National Endowment for the Arts and an Oregon Odyssey of the Mind Creativity Award, and was the author of several books, videos and articles including The Art of Play. In memory of his wife, Nancy, Lou established a scholarship fund at Linfield in 2001. “Nils taught us how to embrace life with curiosity, joy and awe,” said Professor Brian Winkenweder, chair of the art and visual culture department. “He was in constant motion towards the future, and he would want us to go forward with joy and not look back in sorrow. I learned much from Nils, but most of it can be reduced to a simple and elegant ethos: PLAY!” Got news? Have you changed jobs? Received a promotion? Returned to school? Received another degree? Started a business? Did you get married or have a child in the last 12 months? If you have news for your classmates and other Linfield friends, visit us, linfield.edu/alumni.


2014 Winter Linfield Magazine
To see the actual publication please follow the link above