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2014 Winter Linfield Magazine

“These sorts of classes and events make us better citizens because they teach us to understand other people.” – Tim Singer ’15 nationally and globally. One critical aspect of citizenship is to apply the skills and knowledge gained through PLACE to the public domain through service, conversations and raising awareness. “These sorts of classes and events make us better citizens because they teach us to understand other people,” notes Tim Singer ’15, a math major. He said the PLACE topic has moved beyond classes, events and exhibits to permeate social discussions. His viewpoint has been challenged, specifically during the panel discussion during which Vietnam War objectors and supporters alike favored reinstating the draft so that all Americans would be equally affected – and equally motivated to find another solution. “I’d never thought of the draft as having benefits,” Singer added. “You take something like that where your viewpoint is just blown away and you want to talk with other people about it. Since then, I’ve been talking with my friends and family about the draft and the larger issues of war.” And this is just the sort of dialog that David Sumner, associate professor of English, values most about the PLACE program. “To see a conscientious objector sit next to a full bird colonel and have civil conversation is the exact thing I want my students to experience,” he said. “This is the very thing liberal arts education is about.” – Laura Davis Faculty fellows Patrick Cottrell, political science Jesús Ilundáin-Agurruza, philosophy David Fiordalis, religious studies Joelle Murray, physics Joan Paddock, music Eric Schuck, economics Barbara Seidman, English Scott Smith, history Jeremy Weisz, biology Brian Winkenweder, art Student fellows Breanna Ribeiro ’14 Megan Schwab ’15 Tyler Schiewe ’16 How Do We Know? The 2014-15 PLACE theme asks this most basic of human questions from a variety of disciplinary perspectives, exploring the methods used to acquire knowledge. Questions to consider may include: What are the powers and limits of science? How do the humanities factor into this equation? What are the underlying assumptions of the scientific method and how do we know they are correct? How do statistics, pure mathematics or computational models inform views on the human experience? Can philosophy, religious studies, the arts or literature still reveal deep truths that make a difference? In the end we should always ask as a rejoinder to any answer... how do we know? Upcoming PLACE events Feb. 20: Mark Juergensmeyer, “Religion and Violence in a Globalized World,” 7 p.m., Ice Auditorium March 13: Andrew Bacevich, “The Limits of Power: The End of American Exceptionalism,” 7 p.m., Ice Auditorium March 18: Elaine Scarry, “Thinking in an Emergency,” 7:30 p.m., Nicholson Library April 1-30: Wafaa Bilal art exhibit, Linfield Art Gallery April 15: Herb Maschner, “Pre-contact Warfare in Alaska,” 7 p.m., Jonasson Hall May 5: Aimee Phan reading, The Reeducation of Cherry Truong, 7:30 p.m., Nicholson Library linfield.edu/PLACE Winter 2014 l i n f i e l d m a g a z i n e - 1 3


2014 Winter Linfield Magazine
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