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2016 Linfield Magazine Summer

of nursing, students take courses in art, history, humanities and religion that help them think in different ways as nurses. Integrated clinical experiences are critical to weaving together foundational concepts. “The liberal arts foundation provides a better way of relating to patients and hearing their needs at any given moment, because that’s really what nursing is about,” Kozy said. “The response is emotional, social, physiological, psychological and spiritual. It’s all those things.” Helping people stay healthy Community-based health care – helping people stay healthy – is at the heart of the Linfield nursing curriculum. Escalating health care costs and increased chronic illnesses mean the traditional care model is changing, and the Linfield nursing program is responding. What was previously provided in the hospital or clinical setting is now often done in homes, with an emphasis on patient education and empowerment. Every year, in addition to course requirements, Linfield nursing students put in approximately 1,000 hours of clinical learning at some 55-65 sites in Oregon and Washington. They work under the supervision of clinical instructors and alongside nurses in a combination of community settings and clinic-based care, making home visits, taking blood pressures and weights, assessing medication levels and more. They learn how to help patients manage chronic diseases at home instead of in the hospital. They also learn how to collaborate closely with the providers by providing pertinent and critical assessment findings during their visits. Kim Kintz, assistant professor of nursing, has provided experiences for her students in the community for a number of years. When possible, Kintz involves students in her role as a nurse practitioner working with vulnerable and underserved populations. Her work has included inmates at the Oregon State Penitentiary and refugees through the Multnomah County Health Department. She and Henny Breen, associate professor of nursing, have led January Term courses in impoverished areas of Cameroon and Peru. They also led a January Term trip to New Zealand to provide McMinnville and Portland students the opportunity to learn about cross-cultural collaboration and a different health care system. “Students see what it’s like when there isn’t access to care and how you prioritize when the patients need everything,” Kintz said. “In Cameroon, the students did over 596 assessments of kids and adults.” Another aspect of community interaction occurs in the RN-BSN program, which includes already-licensed RNs. Those students have a service learning component, and are tasked with identifying needs in their own communities and creating projects to address them. Emilie Minney ’16 and Trisha Mannix ’16 worked with the Westbrook Homeowners Association, an over-65 community in Beaverton, on disaster preparedness and education. They met with residents in their homes prior to a citywide exercise in May and talked with them about ways to survive a natural disaster. The community projects are rewarding for the nurses and beneficial for the organizations, say Professors Breen and Melissa Jones, who teach RN-BSN students. Not only do students develop confidence in their leadership abilities, but they also gain a deeper understanding of vulnerability – for example, what it means to live in poverty or to have a trauma history. “Even though students learn and theorize about it in the classroom, when they’re actually face-to-face with it and see it, it changes their world view, and it changes who they are as nurses,” Breen said. Meet the Linfield nursing student There is no typical nursing student. Students range from young professionals with prior degrees and experienced registered nurses to 20-year-olds seeking bachelor’s degrees. Here are the three general categories of nursing students, all working toward a Bachelor of Science in Nursing. Traditional – students migrate from the McMinnville Campus or transfer from another institution. • Average age: 25 • 33% U.S. students of color • 17% male; 83% female • 53% began enrollment at Linfield on the McMinnville Campus; 47% transfer from other institutions to the Portland Campus Accelerated – students with prior bachelor’s degree, 15-month program • Average age: 28 • 22% U.S. students of color • 38% male; 62% female RN-BSN – registered nurses pursuing a bachelor’s degree • Online program for working nurses • Average age: 38 • 17% U.S. students of color • 11% male; 89% female 8 - l i n f i e l d m a g a z i n e Summer 2016


2016 Linfield Magazine Summer
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