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2014 Summer Linfield Magazine

Amber Fries ’00, left, with Shelby Duarte ’14 in the vineyard at Duck Pond Cellars near Dundee. Duarte was one of five students in the inaugural Oregon Wine Industry Experience program launched last year. In addition to spending the summer meeting with the winery’s owners and winemakers and working in the vineyards, Duarte spent fall semester working at the Ponzi Wine Bar in Dundee and had a marketing internship with Fries at Duck Pond spring semester. Duarte plans to remain in the area and hopes to work in the Oregon wine industry. 8 - l i n f i e l d m a g a z i n e Summer 2014 Comparing Oregon and Burgundy Of course, learning about the wine industry wasn’t all hard, gritty work. During January Term, the OWIE students spent two weeks on campus, then two weeks in Burgundy, France. In Oregon they met with a variety of wine professionals to begin exploring the history and landscape of Oregon and Burgundy winegrowing regions and the international wine business. Coursework included the fundamentals of wine tasting, differences between the soils, climates and wines of Oregon and Burgundy, and the primary functions of various professional roles they might pursue. Thanks to the assistance of Whitney Schubert ’01 (see page 31), former IPNC director and now a wine distributor based in New York, the group spent two weeks meeting and talking with some of the top experts in the region and the world. They returned with an understanding of how vastly different – and alike – the two regions are. Students learned about the relationship between Burgundy and Oregon from French winemakers at Domaine Drouhin in Beaune and Evening Land, both of which have vineyards and wineries in Oregon. They met with French professors who discussed wine economics, viticulture, oenology and sensory studies, and learned about the effect of oak barrels on aging. They explored the notion of terroir – a sense of place – and how climate, geography and soil affect the wine – or how the “grapes are an ink blotter of the soil,” as one person described it. They learned about the historic and current roles of négociants – merchants who may not own vineyards, but who buy grapes and finished wines for blending and bottling under their own label. They walked in the vineyards and along the small streets of Burgundy villages, listened to the histories of various vineyards and families and studied the characteristics of the different regions. They met with brokers, growers and with the world’s premier wine critic. As a result, Peterson and three students – Duarte, Patrick Hickok ’14 and Whitney Weber ’14 – completed a research project on the differences and differing perspectives between the Oregon and Burgundian wine industries. The project explored the history of the two regions, how climate, soils and location affect the wine, and some of the differences in labeling, marketing and distribution. The art of the label The colors and patterns of the Oregon vineyards and the streets of Burgundy served as inspiration for Kelly Carmody ’14 when she and Caren Siegel ’14 tackled the challenge of developing a wine label. It was used for a special Linfield College bottling of pinot noir donated by Moe Momtazi, Maysara Winery owner and Linfield College trustee.


2014 Summer Linfield Magazine
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