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2015 Fall Linfield

In their own words How summer science research impacts Linfield College students Nalea Trujillo ’17 Biochemistry and molecular biology major Honolulu, Hawaii Project: Fabrication and characterization of sol- and aero-gel materials containing novel silver and gold nanoparticles for chemical sensing applications. A lot of learning occurs during research, a good portion of which cannot be learned through traditional coursework. Formulating and investigating theses, working independently in lab and adjusting to obstacles along the journey stretches my mind and enhances my skills. Research keeps me interested, motivated and inspired in the sciences. Research has taught me the value of good work ethics including efficiency and responsibility. Austin Browning ’16 Biology major Boise, Idaho Project: Discovering and deciphering the role for a component in the miRNA-mediated gene silencing pathway Research teaches me how real-world science works, from the designing of the experiment, to the development of new protocols and procedures, to data collection and analysis, to communication about our project. The ability to break down complex processes and details into relatable, easy to understand concepts is a skill I’ll use for the rest of my life. I’ve come to see just how collaborative 21st century science really is — we collaborated with other faculty and research students from the Chemistry and Physics Departments, in addition to our lab in the Biology Department. Marisa Specht ’16 Environmental science major Eugene Project: Enhancing razor clam management using molecular probes for pathogen detection, developing a protocol to screen clams for infection Research gives me the opportunity to apply the knowledge and skills I learn in the classroom in a hands-on situation. This allows me to understand the concepts we learn in class better and opens my eyes to the different ways they're used outside of an academic setting. Research is important to me for my future career because the best thing I can do now is gain experience in the field and in the lab. This is the time for me to develop my skills. Things almost never turn out the way you want them to and it's important to be able to think quickly on your feet. 1 0 - l i n f i e l d m a g a z i n e Fall 2015


2015 Fall Linfield
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