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Linfield Mag 28 Fall 2014

Off the bookshelf Little Century By Anna Keesey, Renshaw Distinguished Professor of Literature and Writing | Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2012 Little Century, a literary historical novel set in central Oregon in the year 1900, concerns the fortunes of Esther Chambers, an orphaned 18-year-old who comes from Chicago in search of her only living relative, a cattle rancher named Ferris Pickett. Pickett and other townspeople are involved in an increasingly violent war over water and range land, and under these circumstances, Esther’s romantic, ethical and vocational lives are forged. The Political Thought of Frederick Douglass: In Pursuit of American Liberty By Nick Buccola, associate professor of political science New York University Press, 2012 Frederick Douglass, one of the most prominent figures in African-American and United States history, was born a slave, but escaped to the North and became a well-known anti-slavery activist, orator and author. Beyond his role as an abolitionist, Buccola argues for the importance of understanding Douglass as a political thinker who provides deep insights into the challenge of achieving and maintaining the liberal promise of freedom. The Nature of Borders: Salmon, Boundaries, and Bandits on the Salish Sea By Lissa Wadewitz, associate professor of history University of Washington Press, 2012 For centuries, borders have been central to salmon management customs on the Salish Sea, but how those borders were drawn has had very different effects on the Northwest salmon fishery. Illegal fishing, broken contracts and fish piracy contributed to overfishing, social tensions and international mistrust. The book examines the ecological effects of imposing cultural and political borders on the West Coast salmon fishery. Missionary Impositions: Conversion, Resistance, and other Challenges to Objectivity in Religious Ethnography Co-edited by Hillary Crane, associate professor of anthropology, and Deana Weibel | Lexington Books, 2012 In this collection of essays, anthropologists of religion examine the special challenges they face when studying populations that proselytize. This volume provides a range of responses to the question of how anthropologists should approach the gap between belief and disbelief when missionary zeal imposes its interpretations on anthropological curiosity. 2 6 - l i n f i e l d m a g a z i n e Fall 2013 Cultures of Energy: Power, Practices, Technologies Co-edited by Tom Love, professor of anthropology, Sarah Strauss and Stephanie Rupp | Left Coast Press, 2013 This path-breaking volume explores cultures of energy, the underlying but underappreciated dimensions of both crisis and innovation in resource use around the globe. Theoretical chapters situate pressing energy issues in larger conceptual frames, and ethnographic case studies reveal energy as it is imagined, used and contested in a variety of cultural contexts. Contributors address issues including the connection between resource flows and social relationships in energy systems, cultural transformation and notions of progress and collapse, the blurring of technology and magic, and more. Each of five thematic sections concludes with an integrative and provocative conversation among the authors. The Journal of Marie Bashkirtseff: I Am The Most Interesting Book of All, Volume I & Lust For Glory, Volume II, e-books Translated by Katherine Kernberger, professor of English Fonthill Press, 2013 In 1873 a precocious 14-year-old girl of Russian provincial nobility begins writing her journal in Nice. Marie Bashkirtseff wants many things out of life and they’re tangled and interwoven throughout her journal. She aspires first to a career as an opera singer and then, when she loses her voice to tuberculosis, she turns to a career as an artist. Above all Marie wants fame -- she wants to be remembered by future generations. In 1884 Marie died in Paris of consumption, having written thousands of pages. But the journal as it has been known for more than a century falsifies both her character and her story. Kernberger returns to the original text -- Marie’s notebooks -- to provide a translation that does justice to Marie Bashkirtseff as she appears in her own words. The Musician’s Journey: Crafting Your Career Vision and Plan By Jill Timmons, professor emerita of music and artist in residence Oxford University Press, 2013 The Musician’s Journey escorts musicians, performing artists, music teachers and advanced music students along the road toward a successful career, offering resources to guide them from envisioning the process to achieving the practical details. Included are chapters on careers in higher education, guidance in how to develop a business plan, general tips on grant writing and financial development and more.


Linfield Mag 28 Fall 2014
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