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Linfield Fall 2012

captured audio and video stories, which up until now had only been traded over an early morning cup of coffee before anglers headed out to sea. The stories are part of an online collection in DigitalCommons@Linfield. They are also the focus of an original theatrical script and production, scholarly papers and poster sessions, a traveling poster exhibit, and a photographic exhibit. The project will be featured in a segment onOregon Field Guide, produced by Oregon Public Broadcasting. It is a collaboration of the Department of Theatre and Communication Arts, Jereld R. Nicholson Library, the Pacific City Arts Association, the Pacific City Dorymen’s Association and the Linfield Center for the Northwest. The Oregon Arts Commission has supported the play with an Arts Build Communities grant. The collection of narratives tells the story of the fleet in the words of those who know it best – the anglers and the wives, circa 1950 mothers, husbands, fathers, fish buyers and boat builders. An astounding 15,000 photos, 150 hours of audio and video, and more than 1,500 artifacts have been collected. Combined, the pieces document a way of life and a culture unique to the Oregon coast, according to Professors Brenda DeVore Marshall, project director, and Ty Marshall, who own a home in Pacific City. Both are members of the Pacific City Arts Association and found a project to combine their favorite entities – Linfield students, Pacific City, communication and the arts. “Our students have come to understand the importance of storytelling in handing down traditions,” DeVore Marshall said. “We’ve all become a part of Pacific City.” Hoops in his hip boots Steve Johnson ’82 grew up on a Pacific City street where there was a boat in most driveways. As a boy, he fished the ocean, washed out the boat, and headed to the nearby Nestucca River for summer steelhead. “I played hoops in my hip boots,” said Johnson, who played 1957 basketball at Linfield. As a part-time fisherman, he made enough money to pay his tuition, catching over 100 Coho salmon the first time out in his own boat, the Stanley Steamer. “We always went out in the dark,” said Johnson, who majored in business and sociology and is now a financial planner. “Even if the fish weren’t biting, we still came in in the dark. It was a lot of hard work, which was the best thing I learned.” Like his father and grandfather before him, Johnson spent his summers fishing commercially. His father, JJ, a retired teacher and grand marshal in the 2012 Pacific City Dory Days Whitney Weber ’14, at left, interviews John and Jan Morgan on their porch overlooking the Nestucca River outside Pacific City. John, a welder, is a member of the Pacific City Dorymen’s Association and designed a boat trailer specifically for dories. At right is a series of historic photos of the dory fleet that include some of the many catches. Before there was a road to the beach, anglers rolled dories down to the surf on a barrel or log. Hundreds of historical artifacts, such as the photos shown here, will be included 1964 in the collection found at digitalcommons.linfield.edu/dory. Fall 2012 l i n f i e l d m a g a z i n e - 9


Linfield Fall 2012
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