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Linfield Fall 2012

to make the information accessible to the public, Andrea Snyder ’14 works with Professor Kathleen Spring to upload the material to DigitalCommons@Linfield, an online repository. She creates annotated bibliographies and metadata, structured information that lets search engines such as Google find key words and phrases. Snyder kept a blog during the experience, launching- through-the-surf.tumblr.com, and said she has been struck by the sense of community among the fishermen. “I feel like I’m making a difference,” she said. “I strongly believe in what we’re doing. While a specific interview may be about the individual, they’re all connected.” Their stories came to life on the stage this fall. Professor Jackson Miller and Chris Forrer ’13 wrote Kickin’ Sand and Tellin’ Lies, a fictional tale inspired by the project. The production premiered in the Marshall Theatre in November and was also performed in Pacific City. “People shared such wonderful stories with us,” said Miller. “It gave us a picture of life in Pacific City and in the dory community that was very vivid and intimate. As a playwright, it’s been a wonderful opportunity.” Throughout the interviews, Miller and Forrer kept a log of terms and phrases that gave color to the script. Working with Professor Janet Gupton, Caitlyn Olson ’13 gathered dramaturgical content for the play along with Daphne Dosset ’13. Often from the Pacific City library, the two students read extensively about the dories and made the content available for the play. “Naming conventions are important on a project of this magnitude, so the information will be useful to writers, designers, actors, directors and in DigitalCommons@Linfield as well,” Olson said. Their background research became program notes and gallery displays, and helped the actors and production team to understand the content. Jenny Layton ’14 was responsible for sound during the interviews and later edited the audio files, removing barking dogs and clicks of the camera shutter. She also served as stage manager for the play. Though she has been involved in theatre since age 9, this is the first time she has had the opportunity to be involved in a production from day one. “By listening to the conversations, I’ve come to understand how important this community is to them,” she said. “We can do something to preserve that, not just for them but for others outside of Pacific City.” Keeping history alive Two decades ago, Pacific City supported a half dozen boat builders. Today, one remains. Professor Ty Marshall is documenting a dory construction process, from its initial framing in April 2012 to its launch into the sea in summer 2013. One of the unique aspects of a dory is its ability to launch and land directly from the beach. The vessel is pushed or rowed into the surf until deep enough to drop “I have a great respect for these people,” he said. “Back in the day, a the motor and then powered through the surf into the open ocean. It’s important great number of spin-off industries existed – fish buyers, gas stations, to keep the boat straight heading into the surf, according to Steve Johnson ’82 boat builders, fiberglassers, welders – but a lot of them are gone now.” who explained, “If you go sideways, you’re in trouble because the water will come A relative newcomer to the dory community, welder John in the side.” Morgan arrived in the 1980s and found a niche designing a trailer 1 2 - l i n f i e l d m a g a z i n e Fall 2012


Linfield Fall 2012
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