- Linfield College
McMinnville Admission

Examination Descriptions

Each student has the opportunity to select three exam options in the Linfield Member Questions section of the Common Application. Students are encouraged to select the three exams they feel they could be most successful with - and not those areas they necessarily plan to major in.

Examination Details

Art

The art exam consists of three parts: 

1. ESSAY: Write an essay (2-3 pages typed) addressed to the department faculty articulating the importance of artistic activities in your life and education, and why you are interested in art as a personal, lifelong passion. This should be completed prior to the event.

2. QUESTIONNAIRE: Included with this invitation is a questionnaire to be completed prior to the event. There are neither right nor wrong answers; we are simply interested in learning about your exposure, taste and interests.

3. SIX ORIGINAL WORKS OF ART: At least two of which are to be drawings in charcoal, graphite or pastel. Each is to be about 16 x 20”. They need not be matted or framed. These two drawings should be done from direct observation, not from photographs or any other pre-existing graphic material. They need not be realistic, per se; in fact they may be highly abstracted. The remaining four works of art should be recently completed in any medium or combination of media, including drawing, painting, photography, ceramics, design, sculpture, video, etc.

Biology

The examination will consist of short written responses after observing and conducting biological experiments, along with a short, multiple choice test.

No special equipment or calculators are necessary for the examination.

Time allowed: 2 hours
Notes will not be permitted in the exam.

Business

Business exams are open to all Competitive Scholarship applicants; no prior coursework in business or work experience is needed. You may choose to take one of the following exams:

Accounting
Finance
International Business
Management
Marketing
Sport Management

To begin each of these exams, you will read a brief case scenario. The scenario may be drawn from events in a real organization like Amazon, Intel, or Nike, or from a hypothetical business. Then you will respond to a short set of essay questions. An excellent answer will demonstrate your 1) understanding of the main points described in the scenario; 2) thoughtful and thorough analysis of key issues identified in the scenario; and 3) clear and coherent expression of thought. Time allowed: 90 minutes No books, notes, or other resources are permitted during the exam.

Chemistry

The exam consists of four multi-part problems plus an essay. Please note that although the essay topic is made available in advance, the essay submitted for the exam must be written during the scheduled exam time on the provided exam paper. Non-programmable calculators are permitted and will be provided if you do not bring your own.

“Essay topic: The atomic theory of matter, proposed by Leucippus and Democritus in the fifth century BCE, stated that the universe is composed of fundamentally indivisible particles called atoms and the void in which they exist. Scientists in the 18th and 19th century revived the atomic theory to interpret observed results of experiments. Provide 3 to 5 examples of these observed physical and chemical properties of matter and explain why the observations are best explained by the existence of atoms.”

Time allowed: 2 hours
Notes will not be permitted in the exam.

Communication Arts and Intercultural Communication

The Communication Arts and Intercultural Communication examination consists of three parts.

  1. The first essay is a response to a communication situation presented in the form of a short video clip of a face-to-face interaction. In the essay, you will be asked to discuss your observations of the verbal and nonverbal messages presented by the participants in the video clip and explain the messages you believe are being communicated. This essay will be written during the exam.
  2. The second essay consists of a personal essay that provides a brief autobiographical summary, describes your personal goals, and explains why you believe the study of human communication is important in the world today. This typed essay (two pages max and double-spaced) should be written prior to the exam.
  3. For the third part of the examination, you will engage in a brief interview with faculty and students in the Communication Arts Program. As part of this process, you will present a formal, three-minute speech about a public figure (historical or contemporary) you find interesting or inspirational. Your speech about this person should explain how she or he has made positive contributions to society. You may use one 3”x5” note card during the speech.

Time allowed for written exam: 20 minutes
Time allowed for oral exam: 10–12 minutes

Computer Science

The computer science exam will consist of a set of problems that are intended to test the type of thinking required in the area of computer science. No particular computer skills are needed for the exam. Instead, you will be asked questions that test your ability to think clearly, logically and analytically. Calculators not allowed.

Time allowed: 2 hours
Notes will not be permitted in the exam.

Creative Writing

The English Department offers two different scholarship opportunities: one supports students interested in creative writing; the other supports students interested in literary study itself. During Linfield Scholarship and Visit Weekend, students will spend their two hours with the English Department this way:

Hour One:  English faculty will lead seminar discussions of a selected literary passage with groups of approximately 12 students. 

Hour Two:  Scholarship applicants will then have an opportunity to write an essay reflecting on the discussion in which they've just participated and how it has expanded their understanding of the passage in question. 

ALL APPLICANTS should bring the following with them on the day of the examination:

Candidates should bring a five-page sample of their own creative work to campus that day. Poems should be printed in 12 point type, single-spaced, with a single space between any stanzas. Prose ought to be printed double-spaced with adequate margins. In addition, a single page cover sheet should include your name, a list of the work (or works) in the sample, and the genre for each of these works. You should also introduce the writing sample with a one-page essay commenting in some way on your own writing experience, interests, or aspirations. There's no right or wrong in terms of what to include in this portfolio: choose the works that you think best represent you as a creative writer. Other than genre identifications, no description or discussion should be included. The cover sheet and the five pages of original work should all be stapled together. Your writing sample will be collected from you at the time of the exam.

Economics

The economics competition is a two-part examination. The first part will consist of multiple-choice questions that test basic economic knowledge and reasoning skills. The second part is a written essay that will test your understanding of economic concepts, your analytical skills, and your ability to communicate in writing about economic issues of national or international concern. You will answer two essay questions, one focusing on microeconomics, the other addressing macroeconomics. For each essay you will have two questions from which to choose.

Time allowed: 2 hours.
Notes will not be permitted in the exam.

Education

The Education competition will consist of a writing assignment designed to assess:

  • Analytical skills
  • Depth of understanding
  • Personal voice and perspectives
  • Writing ability

Questions are based on Chandra Arthur’s TEDxOrlando’s The Cost of Code Switching (10:43) which you were to view in advance:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bo3hRq2RnNI

Exam time allowed: 90 minutes
Notes allowed: One 4 x 6 index card, front and back.

Engineering

Engineers creatively apply scientific knowledge to solve real-world problems. The exam is meant to test students’ approaches to creative problem solving, a skill which can be learned in various courses and experiences including science, math, engineering, and arts. Thus students with a wide range of backgrounds can excel on the engineering exam. The exam consists of three parts:

  1. ESSAY: Students should prepare a short (1-2 page) personal essay, providing a brief biography and describing their goals and/or passions in pursuing engineering. This can be brought to the exam, or emailed to jheath@linfield.edu prior to the exam, or written during the exam.
  2. EXAM: Students will respond to two out of four prompts. Three of the prompts are open-ended problems or scenarios that may be tackled from a range of approaches. The fourth prompt is for students who have previously undertaken an engineering or design project that they would like to describe. Students describing a previous project should plan to focus on the problem-solving, design, implementation, and testing of the solution. The medium of the project need not be in a traditional area of engineering per-se; examples might include customizing a vehicle, theatre set design, sewing, app development, robotics, traffic modeling, mechanical design, etc. If it is a team project, the student should focus on their own specific contribution.  If it is helpful, students are welcome to bring photographs of the project, or email those materials to jheath@linfield.edu (the description itself should be written during the exam).  (90 minutes)
  3. MEETING: Either before or after the exam, students will meet with a faculty member to discuss their interests and experiences. These meetings may be individual or in small groups, and will last about 10-15 minutes.

Environmental Studies

Students who choose the environmental studies exam will be asked to answer essay questions about global climate change. We strongly urge students interested in taking this exam to investigate the topic on line at reliable web site such as: https://climate.nasa.gov/, https://www.noaa.gov/climate, and https://www.climatecentral.org/.

Essays will be evaluated according to how well the author demonstrates 1) an understanding of underlying scientific causes of global warming, 2) knowledge of the consequences climate change will have on both ecosystems and humans, 3) an ability to present a coherent public policy response related to climate change, and 4) knowledge of what they can personally do to reduce their carbon footprint.

Time allowed: 90 min.
Notes allowed in exam: no

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General (Humanities & Social Science)

Students will be given the opportunity to select and answer one question focused on different topics. Students will have two hours total to complete the exam.

Faculty members with expertise in each study area will grade the exam answers. Exam reviewers will assess student answers based on their level of engagement with the question, their thoughtfulness, and their writing ability. Students should strive to present a balanced treatment of their selected questions, in other words, taking counter arguments into account when formulating answers to the questions. The final score will consist of the sum total of both scores.

No notes will be permitted in the exam.

On the day of the exam, you will answer just one question from below.

1. What are your “favorites” and why? Select one example of a “favorite” from three of the following nine categories (let’s call them your “Stranded-on-a-Deserted-Island” cultural survival must-haves): 1) visual art; 2) literature; 3) music; 4) theater; 5) film; 6) video game; 7) comic book series, graphic novel or manga; 8) YouTube channel; or 9) television series. Be sure to justify your choices in your essay.

2. How would a student's ability to do well on this exam be affected by issues of inequality such as race, gender, and/or class?

3. Linfield prides itself on student participation in our study abroad program. We see it as a defining feature of a 21st century education that seeks to form global citizens. What does it mean to be a global citizen? Discuss how you, in your chosen field of study or areas of interest, would enhance your Linfield education by taking advantage of an opportunity to study abroad and experience another culture. Consider also how with this background you might make a future contribution in your field or local community.

4. In 1967 Martin Luther King argued that, “We have deluded ourselves into believing the myth that capitalism grew and prospered out of the Protestant ethic of hard work and sacrifices. Capitalism was built on the exploitation of black slaves and continues to thrive on the exploitation of the poor, both black and white.” To what degree is this statement true today? Please give three examples for your argument. Be sure to include the poor, blacks, and whites in your answer. What other groups should be added to this list? Why should they be included?

5. In his book The Case Against Perfection, Harvard professor Michael Sandel examines the ethics of using technology for artificial human enhancement. Some examples of artificial human enhancement include:

Sandel argues that people should avoid using artificial human enhancements because the choice to use these enhancements implies that enhanced humans are valued more than non-enhanced humans, and that this is disrespectful to human intelligence, performance, and dignity. While many scholars agree with Professor Sandel’s conclusion about avoiding artificial enhancement, these thinkers do not all agree with his argument for that conclusion. Meanwhile, other thinkers in those fields disagree with his conclusion and argue that there is nothing wrong with the use of technology to improve human activity.

Using the information provided above, you should answer the following prompt and write your answer in a full argumentative essay.

How could the use of human enhancement technology change society, culture, or entertainment? Would these changes be beneficial or harmful? Given your answers to these questions, do you agree or disagree with Professor Sandel’s conclusion? Justify your answer with an argument.

Global Languages-French

The French scholarships will be awarded on the basis of a written examination and an oral interview.

The written part will be made up of three sections: writing, reading comprehension and listening comprehension. The speaking portion consists of a 15-minute conversation in French with the exam proctors in which a student’s overall abilities with the language are assessed.  Depending on proficiency level, the topics addressed in the conversation range from self-description, likes and dislikes, to the student's family and familial activities, as well as the student's plans and opinions.  The conversation is conducted in such a way as to allow each candidate to use as much of what s/he has learned as possible.  

The French section seeks students who demonstrate motivation in learning the language and furthering their exposure to French speaking cultures.

Time allowed: 2 hours
Notes will not be permitted in the exam.

Global Languages-Japanese

The scholarships in modern languages will be awarded on the basis of a written examination and an oral interview.

The written exam will test reading, writing and aural comprehension. The oral interview consists of a 20-minute interview in which a student’s overall abilities with the language are assessed. The department selects those students who have developed their language proficiency to the highest levels in relation to the time they have been exposed to the foreign language. Please note that insofar as Japanese is a less commonly taught language, the examination is necessarily demanding. Several years of solid high school level Japanese education, at a minimum, are strongly recommended. Please note that native or near-native speakers of Japanese (those who received secondary education in Japan, lived in Japan for more than 5 years, and/or studied at least six years in a Japanese immersion program) may not take the test.

The written portion of the Japanese examination tests students’ abilities to read and write Japanese using Hiragana, Katakana and Kanji. In order to attempt this exam, the candidate should have a working knowledge of at least 200 kanji characters.

Time allowed: 2 hours
Notes will not be permitted in the exam.

Global Languages-Spanish

The Spanish scholarship is awarded to students who can use Spanish in meaningful, communicative ways, with a high degree of accuracy, rich vocabulary, and variety in sentence structure. Best candidates are then those who have had productive oral and written practice and can create strings of sentences that show structural and communicative cohesion, in conversation and in writing.

The Spanish section selects those students who have developed their language proficiency to the highest levels in relation to the time they have been exposed to the foreign language. We also seek students who demonstrate motivation in learning the language and furthering their exposure to Spanish speaking cultures.

We use slightly different criteria to assess Bilingual/Heritage students of Spanish who have grown up speaking the language at home. We seek especially those students who have used Spanish in more formal contexts such as community service and who are interested in furthering their exposure to the diversity of the Spanish-speaking world.

Two Types of Assessment

A 20-minute individual conversation with one of the Spanish professors will test the ability of each candidate to use Spanish in spontaneous conversation. The interview includes personal experiences, prior experience with Spanish, involvement in the community or with Latinos, and other experiences that have enriched the candidate’s education and personal life. All candidates must show the ability to speak Spanish in formal contexts.

The two written essays ask students to speak about their personal experience in diverse communities and to address the importance of Spanish in the 21st century.

Time allowed: 2 hours
Notes or dictionaries will not be permitted in the exam.

Health and Human Performance

The department of Health, Human Performance and Athletics (HHPA) encompasses two major areas of study: Public Health: Health Promotion and Human Performance. Within the Human Performance area of study students can choose from one of three concentrations: Physical Education, Physical Activity and Fitness Studies and Exercise Science. The HHPA competitive exam provides prospective students the opportunity to write two essays from the major areas of study and concentrations within the HHPA department.

To prepare for the scholarship exam prospective students should review: 

Time allowed: 2 hours
Notes will not be permitted in the exam.

History

The history competition consists of an essay exam based on a reading, Diary of Mrs. Amelia Stewart Knight, from Lillian Schlissel, Women's Diaries of the Westward Journey (New York: Schoaken Books, 1992), provided prior to the event.

Student essays will be evaluated according to demonstrated analytical skills, the ability to interpret historical documents, an awareness of historical causality, skill in using historical evidence, and writing ability. Participants should bring their own writing utensils; paper will be provided. 

Time allowed: 2 hours
No notes will be permitted during the exam; students will be provided with a copy of the reading.

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International Relations

Analytical Essay (1 hour and 15 minutes)

Does technology, including social media, favor tyranny around the world? In answering this question, please conduct a critical assessment of the central claims made in the following piece by Yuval Harari, “Why Technology Favors Tyranny.”

https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2018/10/yuval-noah-harari-technology-tyranny/568330/

Essay responses will be evaluated on the author's ability to advance a clear argument, to develop the argument with clarity of logic and evidence, and writing style. The reading or video will be provided in advance. Students are able to bring one 4 by 6 notecard into the exam with notes (to be submitted with the exam), but this is optional. 

Statement of Interest (45 minutes)

Much like a liberal arts education, the International Relations course of study believes in the value of learning from difference. We hope to attract students from a range of different backgrounds (e.g. geographic, intellectual, cultural) and perspectives and we are interested in learning a bit more about your motivation to study complex social and political questions and issues either within these fields or more broadly throughout your time at Linfield University. Please tell us about a question or issue related to International Relations that you are interested in and why. No prior experience or knowledge of the field is necessary. Students are able to bring one 4 by 6 notecard into the exam with notes (to be submitted with the exam), but this is optional.

Journalism and Media Studies

Sponsored by the department of Journalism and Media Studies, this competition consists of two parts: a review of your work samples or a timed essay; and an individual interview. You need only to be interested in studying media and/or journalism to participate. No previous formal coursework in media or journalism is required.

Work Sample Review or Timed Essay

Work Samples: Prepare one or more samples of original work that demonstrate your interests and experience in media production. You may include a mixture of work, including journalism, videos, audio or radio pieces, design projects (e.g., print or web layout, graphics), advertising, blogging, or other forms of media. The collection should include at least one substantial example of your writing. This collection may be organized in paper form or composed in an online format, such as a website or online portfolio service. You should be prepared to discuss your collection of work with Journalism and Media Studies faculty during your individual interview. (If your work samples are online, you will be able to demonstrate them during this discussion.)

Timed Essay: Alternatively, if you do not have a portfolio of media projects to share, you may write a timed essay on Linfield Scholarship and Visit Weekend. The essay is a response to a media text and question that are provided in advance. Please note that although the essay prompt is made available in advance, the essay submitted for the exam must be written during the scheduled exam time. A computer will be provided. You will discuss your analysis with Journalism and Media Studies faculty during your individual interview.

Time allowed: 1 hour
Notes will not be permitted in the exam.

Individual Interview
You will have an individual interview with Journalism and Media Studies faculty at the event to discuss your background, goals, and interests, as well as either your portfolio or finished timed essay.

Law, Rights, and Justice

Analytical Essay (1 hour and 15 minutes)

Is Seattle’s “Democracy Voucher” program a good idea? Please read the following Vox story about the program and write an essay about the implications for rights and justice of this particular law.

https://www.vox.com/2018/11/5/17058970/seattle-democracy-vouchers

Essay responses will be evaluated on the author's ability to advance a clear argument, to develop the argument with clarity of logic and evidence, and writing style. The reading or video will be provided in advance. Students are able to bring one 4 by 6 notecard into the exam with notes (to be submitted with the exam), but this is optional. 

Statement of Interest (45 minutes)

Much like a liberal arts education, the Law, Rights, and Justice course of study believes in the value of learning from difference. We hope to attract students from a range of different backgrounds (e.g. geographic, intellectual, cultural) and perspectives and we are interested in learning a bit more about your motivation to study complex social and political questions and issues either within these fields or more broadly throughout your time at Linfield University. Please tell us about a question or issue related to Law, Rights, and Justice that you are interested in and why. No prior experience or knowledge of the field is necessary. Students are able to bring one 4 by 6 notecard into the exam with notes (to be submitted with the exam), but this is optional.

Literature

The English Department offers two different scholarship opportunities: one supports students interested in creative writing; the other supports students interested in literary study itself. At Linfield Scholarship and Visit Weekend, students will spend their two hours with the English Department this way:

Hour One:  English faculty will lead seminar discussions of a selected literary passage with groups of approximately 12 students. 

Hour Two:  Scholarship applicants will then have an opportunity to write an essay reflecting on the discussion in which they've just participated and how it has expanded their understanding of the passage in question. 

ALL APPLICANTS should bring the following with them on the day of the examination:

Candidates should bring a 3-5 page critical essay written for a literature class and of which you are especially proud. It should be work completed in the last year or so. The essay should be double-spaced with appropriate margins (1.5"-2") You should also include a one-page introduction to your essay that reflects upon what you learned about the work you analyzed as a result of having written the essay.

Mathematics

The mathematics competition is designed to measure the participant's knowledge, background, interest, and ability in mathematics and general problem solving. Participants will be asked to solve four to six problems of a general nature. The problems do not come from a particular subject and may be solved with a variety of approaches. Participants' work will be evaluated on approach, organization, and ability to communicate, as well as completeness and accuracy. Please bring pencils to the exam, but it is not necessary to bring a calculator due to the nature of the questions.

Time allowed: 2 hours

Music - Composition, Instrumental and Vocal

If you are participating in the All-State or All-District conference, you may request to audition for the Linfield Scholarship and Visit Weekend award in Music at Linfield University on Sunday, February 23, rather than Sunday, February 16. Please indicate this request on the Music Scholarship Application Form and on the event response form.

All participants auditioning in music for the awards will automatically be considered for all other music scholarship and grant awards, such as Music Achievement Awards and Participation Grants. Students may audition in voice, piano/instrumental music, or music theory/composition. Up to three awards may be offered in each category (vocal, piano/instrumental and music theory/composition). 

Music Theory/Composition:
High school students who are currently taking Music Theory or AP Music Theory are encouraged to apply for this award. Participants will interview in person and complete a music theory exam to demonstrate music skills and comprehension or submit up to three samples of original music with a recording (CD, DVD, YouTube, MP3, or MIDI) and score when possible. During the interview, students will be asked to sight-read music, sing or perform a short piece on their main instrument, and answer questions about their music interests. Total audition time is 30 minutes (exam), 10 minutes (interview).

Performance: Piano/Instrumental and Vocal:
Participants will be expected to perform prepared solos by two different composers, or one longer composition that demonstrates contrasting styles. Performers are to show versatility in style and may perform portions of one or more compositions. Music participants will also be tested on their ability to sight-read material selected by the Department of Music. Each performer is allotted 10 minutes for the audition time (six minutes of prepared music and four minutes for sight reading and conversation with the faculty). Prior to the audition, performers who need an accompanist will have time to rehearse with one of our staff accompanists. 

Students participating in the music exam must submit the Music Scholarship Application Form to the Department of Music. Participants will receive a written confirmation from the Department of Music of their audition date and time before arriving on campus. Please note rehearsal and audition times may conflict with other event programming throughout the day.

Performers who need an accompanist must also send a copy of the music no later than February 10.

Please send accompanist music as follows:

Via email to:
Shelly Sanderlin, Music Administrative Coordinator
Phone: 503-883-2275

Or mailed to:
Department of Music
Attn: Linfield Scholarship and Visit Weekend Audition
Linfield University
900 SE Baker Street
McMinnville, OR 97128

Nursing

Students participating in the Nursing exam will be asked to read one of the following articles in advance of the event, and reply to the associated questions at the time of the exam:

A Nursing Workforce Diversity Project: Strategies for Recruitment, Retention, Graduation, and NCLEX-RN Success

1. Why is it important to increase diversity of students in schools of nursing?
2. What benefits are related to having a diverse and inclusive nursing workforce?
3. Describe major components of the program for underrepresented nursing students at St. Louis University that led to their retention in and graduation from the university.
4. As a high school student and consumer of healthcare, what did you find most interesting about this article?

White Paper: A Nurse's Guide to the Use of Social Media

1. The article briefly mentions some ways social media can be used for health promotion.  Discuss a specific scenario, real or imagined, of how a nurse might use social media to promote patient or community health?
2. The article states that “effective nurse-patient relationships are built on trust” (p.1, third to last paragraph).  What do you think the author(s) mean by this? Why do you think trust is important in the profession of nursing?
3. Analyze one Illustrative Case at the end of the article and address the following:

a. Briefly summarize the event.
b. Describe in your own words the impact or potential impact to the client of the subject’s use of social media.
c. If you were to write a policy about the use of social media for your selected scenario’s organization, what would be the most important ideas to include?

Time allowed: 2 hours
Notes will not be permitted in the exam.

Philosophy

There is no prompt or question to be prepared in advance. One of the faculty members will give a 15-20 minute lecture on a philosophical topic of her or his expertise. Students will then be given a prompt related to the presentation which they will use to write an essay that will summarize main claims and critically assess those ideas.

Below are the titles and topics of two past competitive lectures, and a couple of sample question prompts from those that were asked at the time (topics and questions will change). 

  • Philosophy and Paleoart – Can we ever know what a Tyrannosaurus really looked like? Why or why not? How good is the evidence for different dinosaur reconstructions?
  • Plato’s thoughts on reality and art – How do Plato’s ideas apply in today’s world and to your life? Does art have any redeeming attributes?

Since Philosophy is rarely encountered before college, no previous knowledge of philosophy is assumed. We are most interested in seeing your ability to dynamically respond to and thoughtfully engage the ideas presented during the short lecture. We will pay attention to your ability to synthesize and accurately reflect the ideas presented, how well you articulate and organize your thoughts, and your capacity to critically engage the ideas discussed using the suggested questions as prompts.

Time Allowed: 1 hour

Physics

Students with a background in sciences and mathematics, and an interest in pursuing physics, will do well on this exam. The exam is meant to allow students to showcase their own individual strengths and knowledge. The exam consists of two parts:

  1. ESSAY: Students should prepare a short (1-2 page) personal essay, providing a brief biography and describing their goals and/or passions in pursuing physics. This can be brought to the exam, or emailed to jheath@linfield.edu prior to the exam, or written during the exam.
  2. EXAM: Students will respond to four questions from six options. These will be longer, somewhat open-ended questions allowing students to demonstrate their problem-solving skills and science and mathematics knowledge (90 minutes).

There will also be an opportunity for small group discussions with a faculty member, either before or after the exam.

Time allowed: 2 hours
Notes will not be permitted in the exam.

Political Science

Analytical Essay (1 hour and 15 minutes)

Does widening economic inequality threaten American democracy? In answering this question, please read and critically respond to the central claims made in the following piece by David Callahan, “American elections are a battle of billionaires. We are merely spectators.”

https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2018/jul/05/american-elections-battle-billionaires-civic-inequality

Essay responses will be evaluated on the author's ability to advance a clear argument, to develop the argument with clarity of logic and evidence, and writing style. The reading or video will be provided in advance. Students are able to bring one 4 by 6 notecard into the exam with notes (to be submitted with the exam), but this is optional. 

Statement of Interest (45 minutes)

Much like a liberal arts education, the Political Science course of study believes in the value of learning from difference. We hope to attract students from a range of different backgrounds (e.g. geographic, intellectual, cultural) and perspectives and we are interested in learning a bit more about your motivation to study complex social and political questions and issues either within these fields or more broadly throughout your time at Linfield University. Please tell us about a question or issue related to Political Science that you are interested in and why. No prior experience or knowledge of the field is necessary. Students are able to bring one 4 by 6 notecard into the exam with notes (to be submitted with the exam), but this is optional.

Psychology

Students will view a TED talk, such as this one: https://www.ted.com/talks/kelly_mcgonigal_how_to_make_stress_your_friend

Students will then be asked to respond to a prompt, such as this one:

Having watched Dr. McGonigal’s TED talk “How to Make Stress your Friend”, contrast two different perspectives in psychology in explaining responses to stress, other than the perspective outlined by Dr. Gonigal. You are welcome to integrate the Dr. McGonigal’s perspective into your answer, but should include two other perspectives from the list below:

Perspectives in Psychology:

  • Abnormal
  • Biological 
  • Cognitive
  • Developmental 
  • Personality 
  • Social

You are encouraged to think about how Dr. McGonigal and other psychologists come to know about complex concepts like stress. Please remember, you are encouraged to use research findings, concepts, and theories from two different perspectives in psychology when composing your written response.

In this essay, we are looking for students to draw upon different theoretical perspectives for approaching a phenomenon. A strong response will refer to specific theories, concepts, and research examples from different subfields of psychology.

Students will be provided with a blue book and will have 2 hours to complete the exam.

Religious Studies

The exam will be an essay response to a series of film clips. At the beginning of the exam time, the student will watch clips with religious themes from 3 different movies. Scripts from the movie scenes and exam questions will be distributed. The exam will consist of a number of questions and topics related to the clips, and the student will need to formulate a position and respond to the given questions/topics. Supporting evidence for the position should come from the films and the student’s experiences. Students need not watch the movies in their entirety prior to the exam, but they may want to. Examples of possible films/series include the Harry Potter series, Star Wars, The Matrix, etc.

In this essay, we are looking at your depth of response and your ability and willingness to engage in a diverse range of religious questions and traditions. We are also assessing your ability to engage the films, work with them as primary texts and effectively communicate your thoughts. Formal coursework in religious studies is not required for this competition, though you should give evidence of an interest in and openness to the study of religion in all of its forms, ancient and modern. A sample exam is available for review.

Time Allowed: 2 hours

Sociology & Anthropology

The article by Phillipe Bourgois "Poverty at Work: Office Employment and the Crack Alternative” highlights how employment shifts can impact people. Draw from the article to identify a current situation, in the U.S. or another country, in which social forces similarly impact individuals and their livelihoods. In your essay, compare and contrast your example with that in the Bourgois article.

At the exam, you will be provided an exam book and a copy of the reading. You may also bring one 3x5 index card with notes. If you do bring a card, you'll be expected to turn it in with the exam.

Time limit: 60 minutes.

Theatre

The faculty and students of the Theatre Arts Program will interview students interested in many areas of theatre.

Students focusing primarily on acting/directing should prepare two contrasting audition pieces that illustrate the range of their acting talent. The combined pieces should not exceed 5 minutes.

Design students (scenic, lighting, costume, sound) should bring a portfolio of their work and be prepared to discuss their design experience and/or during the interview.

Technical theatre, business or promotions students should prepare a narrative explaining their experience and interest in their particular fields of theatre. If materials are available, these students are encouraged to bring portfolios as well.

As part of the process, students will have an opportunity to discuss the Linfield Theatre Program with current students.

All students must send a resume and a letter of recommendation from their drama teacher or director to the Office of Admission by February 8. They may also be emailed to admission@linfield.edu.

The audition/interview process should discover the generally talented student as well as the exceptionally talented student. Both will be given equal consideration.

Time allowed for audition: 5 minutes
Time allowed for interview: as necessary