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Part I:  CORE COURSES

SOAN 040: Community Service

Primary Learning Outcome:

At the end of the course, students should be able to:

  • apply anthropological/sociological ideas/concepts to a service experience.

This course is designed to emphasize, at an intermediate level, department goals 1 and 5:

  • the ability to see how individual lives are connected with wider social and cultural processes and forces; and
  • the ability to work both independently and cooperatively in application of sociological or anthropological ideas.

SOAN 085: Exploring Sociology & Anthropology

Learning Outcomes:

At the end of the course, students should be able to:

  • understand the educational and career opportunities available in the disciplines of sociology and anthropology; and
  • develop an educational plan that will help them to (1) make the most out of their Linfield experience and (2) work toward desired career outcomes.

SOCL 101: Fundamentals of Sociology

Learning Outcomes:

At the end of the course, students should be able to:

  • understand and describe sociology as a discipline;
  • understand and apply major theoretical frameworks (symbolic interactionism, structural functionalism, and conflict theory), methods, and sociological concepts (including socialization, social organization, social structure, institutions, norms, values, culture, and stratification (race/ethnicity, social class, gender));
  • understand the role that social structures and institutions play in shaping individual behavior and decision-making;
  • understand the role that norms, values, and culture play in social life; and
  • think more critically about society and the world around us.

This course is designed to emphasize, at a fundamental level, department goals 1-5:

  • the ability to see how individual lives are connected with wider social and cultural processes and forces;
  • fundamental understanding of the relationship between theory and method in the historical context of their discipline;
  • the ability to access, organize, critically analyze, and produce knowledge about humans as social and cultural beings;
  • oral and written skills for effective communication, both inside and outside academic contexts; and
  • the ability to work both independently and cooperatively in application of sociological or anthropological ideas.

ANTH 111: Cultural Anthropology

Learning Outcomes:

At the end of the course, students should be able to:

  • grasp the concept of culture as learned, shared guidelines for social behavior that people use to make the world meaningful;
  • demonstrate a basic understanding of the anthropological perspective, which is to describe and explain cultural similarities and differences using the concepts of comparison, holism, cultural relativism, and ethnographic fieldwork;
  • recognize the role of cultural difference in the context of our shared humanity; and
  • read and critically analyze ethnographic writing as well as critically view ethnographic film, and demonstrate these abilities both through in-class discussions and written work.

This course is designed to emphasize, at a fundamental level, department goals 1-5:

  • the ability to see how individual lives are connected with wider social and cultural processes and forces;
  • fundamental understanding of the relationship between theory and method in the historical context of their discipline;
  • the ability to access, organize, critically analyze, and produce knowledge about humans as social and cultural beings;
  • oral and written skills for effective communication, both inside and outside academic contexts; and
  • the ability to work both independently and cooperatively in application of sociological or anthropological ideas.

SOAN 307: Social Research Methods

Learning Outcomes:

At the end of the course, students should be able to:

  • understand the characteristics and issues that make science different from other ways of knowing.
  • understand the historical antecedents of methodology as they relate to the social sciences today.
  • understand the links between theory and research;
  • understand political and ethical decisions that affect social research;
  • understand the uses of research in social work, government, and management;
  • understand the structure of inquiry;
  • understand and apply the methods and methodology discussed in class through a series of projects which allows you to analyze, question, and discuss the methods and their underlying assumptions;
  • understand and apply qualitative data analysis techniques; and
  • understand and apply quantitative data analysis techniques (use of SPSS, appropriate statistical measures, underlying assumptions, and strengths and limitations of the procedures).

Specific Methods to be Covered: survey/interview research, qualitative field research, unobtrusive research, evaluation research, and experiments.

This course is designed to emphasize, at an advanced level, department goals 1 -3:

  • the ability to see how individual lives are connected with wider social and cultural processes and forces;
  • fundamental understanding of the relationship between theory and method in the historical context of their discipline; and
  • the ability to access, organize, critically analyze, and produce knowledge about humans as social and cultural beings.

This course is designed to emphasize, at an intermediate level, department goals 4-5:

  • oral and written skills for effective communication, both inside and outside academic contexts; and
  • the ability to work both independently and cooperatively in application of sociological or anthropological ideas.

SOAN 385: Social Theory

Learning Outcomes:

At the end of the course, students should demonstrate:

  • an appreciation for theory and the role it plays in sociology and anthropology;
  • an understanding of theory in the context of contemporary life;
  • a better sense of how theories and methods interact;
  • an understanding of particular theories from the vantage point of the historical context in which they were written;
  • an increased capacity to think and write critically; and
  • an ability to synthesize complex ideas and apply these ideas to contemporary issues and problems.

This course is designed to emphasize, at an advanced level, department goals 1 -2:

  • the ability to see how individual lives are connected with wider social and cultural processes and forces; and
  • fundamental understanding of the relationship between theory and method in the historical context of their discipline.

This course is designed to emphasize, at an intermediate level, department goals 3-5:

  • the ability to access, organize, critically analyze, and produce knowledge about humans as social and cultural beings;
  • oral and written skills for effective communication, both inside and outside academic contexts; and
  • the ability to work both independently and cooperatively in application of sociological or anthropological ideas.

SOAN 485/486: Senior Proseminar I, II: Theory and Practice

Learning Outcomes:

This sequence of courses provides students with an opportunity to:

  • assess areas of strength and weakness in writing, speaking, skill development, and professional presentation of self;
  • pursue academic and career goals and to address areas of weakness through short and long range planning;
  • develop professional integrity and public speaking skills by scheduling, coordinating, and facilitating the weekly Voices series;
  • understand the application of sociological and/or anthropological ideas through the proposal and completion of an applied senior capstone project; and
  • develop skills necessary to seek employment, advanced training, or service experience after college through the preparation of relevant documents and materials.

This sequence of courses is intended to emphasize, at an advanced level, department goals 3-5:

  • the ability to access, organize, critically analyze, and produce knowledge about humans as social and cultural beings;
  • oral and written skills for effective communication; and
  • the ability to work both independently and cooperatively in application of sociological or anthropological ideas.

Senior Capstone Courses (SOAN 404, SOAN 454, SOAN 456, SOAN 460, SOAN 465)

While the substantive area of each of these courses varies, each course is intended to emphasize, at an advanced level, department goals 1-4:

  • the ability to see how individual lives are connected with wider social and cultural processes and forces;
  • fundamental understanding of the relationship between theory and method in the historical context of your discipline;
  • the ability to access, organize, critically analyze, and produce knowledge about humans as social and cultural beings; and
  • oral and written skills for effective communication.

These courses are intended to emphasize, at an intermediate level, department goal 5:

  • the ability to work both independently and cooperatively in application of sociological or anthropological ideas.

MWI: All senior capstone courses meet the Major Writing Intensive (MWI) requirement within the Linfield Curriculum. Courses designated as MWI pay explicit attention to writing and writing instruction while engaging students in all phases of the writing process. Furthermore, writing assignments are a significant portion of the course work and the course grade. In MWI courses, students:

  • frame key questions important to the understanding of their discipline;
  • answer such questions in writing appropriate to the conventions of their discipline and compelling to an intended audience;
  • develop or further refine an iterative writing process that includes prewriting activities (e.g. discussion, research, literature review) drafting, revising and editing, and that is appropriate for their chosen discipline; and
  • receive significant instruction and feedback helping them in the various steps of this process.

World Area Courses

Learning Outcomes:

Upon completing a world area course, students should be able to demonstrate:

  • knowledge of a culture area that encompasses not only what distinguishes that culture area from other culture areas, but also what cultural variability exists within that culture area;
  • knowledge of how the cultures in that culture area have changed over time; and
  • knowledge of the institutions and cultural practices there that is both broad and deep (encompassing such issues as religion, economic exchange, and the family).

Like other 200-level courses, these courses are intended to emphasize, at a fundamental level, department goals 1-5:

  • the ability to see how individual lives are connected with wider social and cultural processes and forces;
  • fundamental understanding of the relationship between theory and method in the historical context of their discipline;
  • the ability to access, organize, critically analyze, and produce knowledge about humans as social and cultural beings;
  • oral and written skills for effective communication, both inside and outside academic contexts; and
  • the ability to work both independently and cooperatively in application of sociological or anthropological ideas.

Building on students’ previous exposure, these courses move toward an intermediate level of emphasis with regard to department goals 1 and 3:

  • the ability to see how individual lives are connected with wider social and cultural processes and forces; and
  • the ability to access, organize, critically analyze, and produce knowledge about humans as social and cultural beings.

Part II: Other Courses

100-Level Courses (beyond SOCL 101 and ANTH 111)

Substantive areas vary. In general, each 100-level course is intended to emphasize, at a fundamental level, department goals 1-5:

  • the ability to see how individual lives are connected with wider social and cultural processes and forces;
  • fundamental understanding of the relationship between theory and method in the historical context of their discipline;
  • the ability to access, organize, critically analyze, and produce knowledge about humans as social and cultural beings;
  • oral and written skills for effective communication, both inside and outside academic contexts; and
  • the ability to work both independently and cooperatively in application of sociological or anthropological ideas.

200-Level Courses (beyond world area courses)

Substantive areas vary. In general, each 200-level course is intended to emphasize, at a fundamental level, department goals 1-5:

  • the ability to see how individual lives are connected with wider social and cultural processes and forces;
  • fundamental understanding of the relationship between theory and method in the historical context of their discipline;
  • the ability to access, organize, critically analyze, and produce knowledge about humans as social and cultural beings;
  • oral and written skills for effective communication, both inside and outside academic contexts; and
  • the ability to work both independently and cooperatively in application of sociological or anthropological ideas.

Building on students’ previous exposure, these courses move toward an intermediate level of emphasis with regard to department goals 1 and 3:

  • the ability to see how individual lives are connected with wider social and cultural processes and forces; and
  • the ability to access, organize, critically analyze, and produce knowledge about humans as social and cultural beings.

300-Level Courses (beyond SOAN 307 and SOAN 385)

Substantive areas vary. In general, each 300-level course is intended to emphasize, at an advanced level, department goal 1:

  • the ability to see how individual lives are connected with wider social and cultural processes and forces; and

These courses are intended to emphasize, at an intermediate level, department goals 2-5:

  • fundamental understanding of the relationship between theory and method in the historical context of their discipline;
  • the ability to access, organize, critically analyze, and produce knowledge about humans as social and cultural beings;
  • oral and written skills for effective communication, both inside and outside academic contexts; and
  • the ability to work both independently and cooperatively in application of sociological or anthropological ideas.