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2/23/2006 Lecture, performance highlight Well Arts events at Linfield

McMINNVILLE ? Real life stories of trauma and survival will be brought to life during a lecture and theatrical performance at Linfield College on Feb. 28 and March 7.

Kate Hawkes, artistic director of the Well Arts Institute, will present a lecture, "The Arts: Connections to Wellness," on Tuesday, Feb. 28, at 7:30 p.m. in Ford Hall. Her talk will focus on the integral role of the arts to healing, outline the early role of the artist in healing and examine current work being done. Hawkes will also talk about the Well Arts Institute, a nationally recognized arts in healthcare organization which she founded, and Performing Wellness?, a process which combines storytelling, writing, theatre and the power of community to bring healing and hope to individuals who have undergone trauma.

"Studies have shown that incorporating both hands-on art experiences as well as the visual, performing and natural arts into the environment has a measurable effect on the health and recovery of those in treatment," said Hawkes, who also serves as adjunct professor of theatre arts at Linfield.

A theatrical collage of five inspirational stories will be performed on Tuesday, March 7, at 7:30 p.m. in the Marshall Theatre in Ford Hall. The stories deal with issues of cancer, war, rape, multiple sclerosis and AIDS. Hawkes, director, along with actors and writers, will be on hand for a Talk Back discussion following the 80-minute performance.

Performances include "Side Effects" by Belle Bennett Landau and performed by Lavern Springer; "I Keep Hoping" by Carolyn Mills, performed by Linfield sophomore Katie Dolph and junior Caleb Kearns; "Welcome Home" by Eran Deran and performed by Michael Teufel; "Georgena?s Journey" by Georgena Moran, performed by Sharon Mitchell; and "Showing Up" by Tabor Porter, performed by Hawkes, Teufel and cast.

To date, 46 individual stories have been created through Performing Wellness productions. Individuals are led through a three-month process to create their own stories, which culminate in public performances by professional actors.

"Through these stories of survival, we get an appreciation of human beings and their ability to overcome," Hawkes said. "When we come face to face with the things of which we are most afraid, it is inspiring, encouraging and empowering. We need to hear these personal stories."

Both the lecture and performance are free and open to the public. For more information, contact Hawkes at 503-538-6422 or kate@wellarts.org.

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