Tag Archives: Faculty

Faculty recital sings their way onto stage

Spencer Beck/Staff photographer

 

 

Adjunct Professor of Music Natalie Gunn (left) and Sarah Maines
perform at Gunn’s faculty recital on March 16 in the Delkin Recital Hall. Gunn teaches vocal performance in the Linfield music department. Maines, a friend of Gunn, sings while the piano is playing.

Faculty and friends to sing together on stage

Adjunct professor of music Natalie Gunn will present a faculty recital with fellow colleagues and friends.

Gunn is a soprano who teaches vocal performance at Linfield. Soprano Erin G. McCarthy, mezzo-soprano Sarah Maines and Linfield College alumna, Susan McDaniel will join her at the recital.

McCarthy is a friend of Gunn and is a vocal instructor in Newberg, Ore. where she teaches at her home studio. Maines works for Oregon Health and Science University and helps with voice rehabilitation to injured vocalists.

McDaniel is the principal staff accompanist for the department and accompanies many music major and minor students who perform a music jury at the end fall and spring semester.

The recital will be performed in two parts, featuring duets and trios. The first part of the recital will be sung in Italian.

Those in attendance will be treated to a surprise ending at the recital.

Noteworthy composers featured in the recital include George Frideric Handel, Johann Sebastian Bach, Richard Strauss, and Johannes Brahms.

For more information contact Shelly Sanderlin at the music department, ssander@linfield.edu or 503-883-2275. The faculty recital will be at 4 p.m on March 16 in Ice Auditorium.

Jonathon Williams / Opinion Editor

Stephanie     Hofmann      can                 be                   reached
at                     linfieldreviewsports@gmail.com

 

Linfield loses beloved artist, professor

This holiday season we bid a farewell to a member of the Linfield community.

An email from the President’s Office announced the death of Nils Lou, Professor of Ceramics and Sculpture, on Dec. 26.

Lou passed away in afternoon on Dec. 25 according to John McKeegan’s email.

Lou began teaching at Linfield in 1987. Lou’s artwork has been featured around the world and has created many paintings and sculptures on the Linfield Campus, including the sundial on Murdock Hall.

Lou lived in nearby Willamina, Ore., and he would have been 82 on Jan. 5.

In an article written in the Linfield Review in 2010, Lou commented on the similarities of relationship between people and art.

“I think it’s almost like any relationship, whether it’s with another person or anything that we personalize,” Lou said. “We assign it a certain vitality and life, and it takes on a form sometimes that goes beyond what we think it might.”

Information on his memorial has not been released yet.

 

by Kaylyn Peterson/ Managing editor

Government shutdown affects Linfield students, faculty

Ill-effects of House Republican’s “hostage taking” and the subsequent government shutdown of Oct. 1 are surfacing at Linfield, affecting students and staff alike.

“A faction of Republicans in the House of Representatives is refusing to hold a vote on a continuing resolution that would open the government,” Assistant Professor of Political Science Patrick Cottrell said.

“[The Republican faction] went into this process trying to delay the implementation of the Affordable Care Act [Obamacare}. They don’t want to see it remain a law,” Cottrell said.

“They are using this tactic that some have referred to as ‘hostage taking’ or extortion,” Cottrell said.

Hostage taking refers to the thousands of government workers furloughed, or rather, laid off temporarily, with reduced or no pay.

The furloughed workers, or “hostages,” are putting pressure upon Democrats to resolve the issue. The Republicans hope to leverage this pressure to force key concessions out of the Democrats on Obamacare.

The government shutdown is not confined to Washington D.C.

The widespread government furloughs have deprived many Linfield students and staff alike of much needed governmental resources.

“I have research collaborators at the Pacific Northwest Research Station, and they have been furloughed,” Associate Professor of Biology John Syring said in an  email.

“This has greatly impacted my research, as the work that they [were] contributing to our study has been put on hold indefinitely.  Some of this work is time sensitive,” Syring wrote.

“In the [Economics}  department, most of our upper division classes have projects that rely on government data,” Associate Professor of Economics Eric Schuck said.

“In a number of our classes, the students simply can’t access the resources that they need to do their research,” Schuck said. “Since we can’t access those basic data websites, we are kind of flying blind.”

Linfield is a private institution. It does not depend on substantial amounts of federal fundings.

This is fortunate in that there have been few fiscal discrepancies that have arisen in the Linfield budget according to Syring, who is also a part of Linfield’s budget committee.

Ill-effects of the shut down are not limited to his academic life for one faculty member.

Schuck, also a lieutenant in the Navy Reserve, has faced difficulties with funding the reserve unit that he commands.

A law passed several years ago called the Pay Our Military Act continues to fund American military members on active duty.

Schuck’s unit is a part of America’s reserve forces and is not considered by the government to be “active.”

Schuck’s unit is, therefore, not receiving funds to carry out their monthly drills and responsibilities.

“Because we don’t have the funds to do our monthly duties, our readiness is starting to degrade rather noticeably. It’s very frustrating,” Shuck said.

Ryan Morgan / Senior reporter

Ryan Morgan can be reached at linfieldreviewnews@gmail.com.

Faculty debates freedom meaning

What is freedom? This reoccurring question has plagued the United States since its conception, and even today in 2013, scholars continue the debate.
As a part of the Frederick Douglass Forum, the Department of Political Science hosted the “Politics of Freedom” debate Feb. 26 in Riley 201.
Split by liberal and conservative views, the topic looked at the question. Representing the liberal side was Corey Robin, associate professor of political science at Brooklyn College and the City University of New York Graduate Center. Mark Blitz, Fletcher Jones professor of political philosophy at Claremont McKenna College took the conservative side of the debate.
Blitz started the debate off defining freedom as being “the authority to direct one’s self and not to be constrained in directing one’s self.”
“To preserve freedom or liberty is crucial to understand the freedom or liberty we want to preserve,” Blitz said.
Blitz’s central point in the debate on freedom was that “the primary condition to secure and advance natural freedom is to understand and preserve liberty and equality in this individual sense, which as the Declaration of Independence shows is the intellectual root of our country.”
Robins took the floor after Blitz and pointed out that both “the left and right side view liberty similarly.”
“Freedom on both sides says that it is the right to what you want to do,” Robins said.
Robins went on to describe what freedom included for both sides. The left included personal expression and privacy, freedom of political assembly and sexual and reproductive choices. The right included economic and religious opportunity.
Robins spoke of where the threat to freedom lies. His argument went on to say that the workplace is the main institution where freedom is lost, where rules and regulations can strictly dictate behavior.
“Freedom is the freedom of a body to move unimpeded by external constraints,” Robins said, quoting Thomas Hobbes’s definition of freedom.
Both men described aspects of freedom and what it meant to be free. While there is no single answer to what freedom is, the debate will continue on.
Kaylyn Peterson
Copy chief
Kaylyn Peterson can be reached at
linfieldreviewcopy@gmail.com.