Category Archives: The Rest

Student studies at Linfield, works on the runway

It doesn’t take a lot to figure out why sophomore Savannah Fellers was first scouted by a modeling agency when she was 15. She’s a striking 5’10’’ with blonde hair and blue eyes, and she radiates confidence.

Her mother was skeptical about letting her get a job as a model at the age of 15. Fellers listened to her mother, but when she was scouted again as a college freshman by two modeling agencies, she and her mother looked at both modeling agencies and chose one—Muse Models.

“They’re known as a ‘prude agency,’” Fellers said. “You won’t do anything that is risqué unless they go through to make sure it’s okay.”

Muse Models’ status as a prude agency was one of her reasons for joining the agency. Fellers also admires how they encourage the models to be healthy. Instead of telling their models not to eat, Muse Models tells their models about the healthier choices. It’s the kind of life Fellers would try to have even if she wasn’t a model.

Fellers decided on modeling because she wants to become a fashion designer. Working with Muse Models, Fellers is allowed to make connections with her contacts and try out her creativity. Fellers described an instance from a runway show she did in Portland Oct. 9-12 for FashioNXT as an example.

“There was this one dress I had to try on for FashioNXT,” Fellers said, “but the boob area was too big. You can’t tell the fashion designers what to do, but you get to give them ideas.”

Fellers was inducted into Muse Models in October 2012. Later that year in December she completed her portfolio and was already going to castings in early January. Ever since then, Fellers has balanced school and modeling. The four days she was at FashioNXT she would get up early, do homework, go to class and then commute to Portland.

“On occasion, there’s times where I’ll have to miss class,” Fellers said. “The FashioNXT thing was more like no sleep. I prioritize with my mom. School is more important.”

At Linfield, Fellers wants to major in finance or marketing and minor in art. She believes that all three disciplines would help her become a successful fashion designer, and her mother will keep her on track at college.

“[My mom] wanted it for me,” Fellers said. “She was there for every interview. She wanted to be there every second, but after she met the people at my agency she was more comfortable.”

Fellers got her first job in March, and it was the most risqué job any model from Muse Models would do.

“It was for a bra for Fred Meyer,” Fellers said, laughing.

Although Fellers models for photographs, her favorite jobs are those on the runway.

“It’s like acting,” Fellers said. “People underestimate models. Each outfit that we wore for FashioNXT was a different mood, a different face. When you get put in the outfit and make up, you get to feel like you are that person just for a few seconds as you walk down the runway. It’s pretty cool.”

This summer, Fellers will possibly intern in New York through contacts she made with her dad, who is a widely known horse trainer. As a fashion designer, Fellers plans to begin with equestrian apparel and move on from there, but that is all in the future. At the moment, Fellers will continue her modeling career, possibly into her 20s.

Gilberto Galvez/Features editor

GIlberto Galvez can be reached at linfieldreviewfeatures@gmail.com

Small college prepares recent grads for the big leagues

Daniel Hellinger, 2013 Linfield graduate, interns with the Seattle Mariners baseball organization. At Linfield, Hellinger majored in mass communication.

“Currently, my job title is community relations intern/coordinator,” Hellinger said.

“I deal with player appearances, working with charities around the Northwest, Hawaii, Alaska and Montana, donation fulfillments, and assisting the community relations managers with auctions aiding a wide range of charities the Seattle Mariners work alongside,” Hellinger said.

Hellinger applied for the internship twice, but they refused him because he was still in college.

Studying at Linfield, also kept him far from the team he wanted to work with, but he had the job in mind for a long time. Once he had graduated, they offered him the position.

The internship has given Hellinger a lot of experience, but he still plans to gain more experience from other companies in the Seattle area and then go beyond.

“I have had internships and jobs in sales, marketing and public relations, and now community relations,” Hellinger said.

“With this wide arrange of internships and jobs under my belt, I plan on moving to Hong Kong, where I studied abroad, and start a career while traveling,” Hellinger said.

Jonathan Bosch, 2013 Linfield graduate, works in the NBA field as an account manager in the sponsorship department for the Utah Jazz.

“I write up contracts and assist in the execution process of contractual elements, main contact for Sponsorship tickets, game day duties, execute champion partner benefits and assist all account executives, senior vice president and vice president in a variety of settings,” Bosch said.

Bosch grew up in the Netherlands. He came to study at Linfield and worked as hard as possible to reach the point where he is now. He is not sure why the Utah Jazz hired an international student, but he’s glad they did.

“I spent countless hours on Linkedin, writing handwritten cards and visiting career fairs and NBA executives,” Bosch said. “One day, I had the opportunity to fly out to the Utah Jazz. It was truly a dream come true when they offered me the position.”

In the future, Bosch hopes to go deeper into the NBA field.

“My goal in the next three to six years is to be a mid-senior leader in the NBA and eventually become a general manager for an NBA team in Europe,” Bosch said. “Many people might find this unrealistic, but in this field, you need to have some ‘balls,’ more importantly you need to be willing to go above and beyond to accomplish your dreams.”

position.

The internship has given Hellinger a lot of experience, but he still plans to gain more experience from other companies in the Seattle area and then go beyond.

“I have had internships and jobs in sales, marketing and public relations, and now community relations,” Hellinger said.

“With this wide arrange of internships and jobs under my belt, I plan on moving to Hong Kong, where I studied abroad, and start a career while traveling,” Hellinger said.

Jonathan Bosch, 2013 Linfield graduate, works in the NBA field as an account manager in the sponsorship department for the Utah Jazz.

“I write up contracts and assist in the execution process of contractual elements, main contact for Sponsorship tickets, game day duties, execute champion partner benefits and assist all account executives, senior vice president and vice president in a variety of settings,” Bosch said.

Bosch grew up in the Netherlands. He came to study at Linfield and worked as hard as possible to reach the point where he is now. He is not sure why the Utah Jazz hired an international student, but he’s glad they did.

“I spent countless hours on Linkedin, writing handwritten cards and visiting career fairs and NBA executives,” Bosch said. “One day, I had the opportunity to fly out to the Utah Jazz. It was truly a dream come true when they offered me the position.”

In the future, Bosch hopes to go deeper into the NBA field.

“My goal in the next three to six years is to be a mid-senior leader in the NBA and eventually become a general manager for an NBA team in Europe,” Bosch said. “Many people might find this unrealistic, but in this field, you need to have some ‘balls,’ more importantly you need to be willing to go above and beyond to accomplish your dreams.”

Gilberto Galvez/Features editor

Gilberto Galvez can be reached at linfieldreviewfeatures@gmail.com

The Observatory

The second-oldest building on campus

withstands the challenges of time

Built in 1882, Pioneer Hall has led a continued reign as the oldest building on campus. But the second-oldest building has faced the threat of demolition a few times and has also been moved to different locations around campus.

The Observatory, built in 1883-1844, now stands near Withnell Commons. The Observatory has a long history along with different reincarnations, from an actual observatory to a convenience store to a place for student bands to practice.

“The money for the construction [of the Observatory] came from A.W. Kinney who was an early member of the Board of Trustees and helped raise money for Pioneer Hall also,” said Rich Schmidt, director of resource sharing. “The original cost was $2,500.”

For the first years of its life, the Observatory served its original astronomical purpose. Its initial location was in what is now called the Quad where a majority of the academic buildings are. The move to its current home on the off side of campus occurred after a student protest saved it from demolition in the early 1960s.

“Its location has moved several times,” said Allison Horn, director of auxiliary services. “Legend has it that one of the moves involved the entire football team to move it from one place to the other.”

A thesis essay by Katherine Pitman-Huit, a 1988 alumna, said that the Observatory was pulled by hand and placed observatoryon top of a trucking platform, under this were rolling logs that transported the building.

If the Observatory had been demolished, the telescope would have been integrated into Graf Hall.

Though the protests kept the Observatory from being demolished, the telescope was still put into storage.

“It remained a working observatory until 2001, when it underwent a renovation and the telescope was removed,” Horn said. “It has served a number of purposes over the years, from a convenience store to its current use as a music practice place for students.”

The telescope was removed because of light pollution from McMinnville and other cities. The brightness made the stars difficult to see, but any attempts to demolish it have failed.

“The students protested—mainly through The [Linfield] Review—feeling that it should be preserved for its historical value, since it was the second-oldest building on campus and both a popular spot for students and a unique thing for a small Baptist college in McMinnville to have,” Schmidt said.

In its current reincarnation, the Observatory serves as a place for student bands to practice.

“The key for [the Observatory] can be checked out from the library circulation desk after a bit of paperwork. It has allowed student bands a place to practice and not disturb their neighbors on campus.  The college had a need for all of the student bands on campus to have a place that they could practice about five years ago and the Observatory was identified as that space. A good deal of amazing music has been the direct results of that space for students,” said Dan Fergueson, director of college activities.

There aren’t too many plans for the Observatory in the future, but it seems to be doing well as it is. Fergueson has heard a few things about it becoming home for the Sustainability Office but nothing is concrete with the Observatory.

Gilberto Galvez/Features editor

Gilberto Galvez can be reached at linfieldreviewfeatures@gmail.com

The Observatory stands beside the Withnell Commons. It reached its current location in 1964.

Rosa Johnson/Copy editor

 

International, exchange students adjust to Linfield

Vince van’t Hoff

Freshman Vince van’t Hoff has traveled to many different countries with his parents. Van’t  Hoff was accepted into the Fulbright program, and they gave him a list of 13 universities they saw him fitting in well with in America.

“I applied for five universities,” van’t Hoff said, “and I got accepted into all.”

He finally decided on Linfield because he had visited the area before and remembered how beautiful it was.

This is van’t Hoff’s first year in college and he still isn’t sure what he wants to study. Although he has a few classes he has found interesting.

“I like psych and communications,” van’t Hoff said, “not like mass communication but how people behave and how they communicate.”

Culturally, van’t Hoff has noticed a difference in how friends communicate here  compared to Holland.

“[Americans] don’t say everything,” van’t Hoff said. “In Holland, my friends said everything that came into their minds, all the stupid things. Here, they’re more careful in what they say.”

Van’t Hoff only has a visa that will allow him to stay in the United States for a year, but he is planning to apply to scholarships in order to be able to study at Linfield next year.

Nohheon Park

Sophomore Nohheon Park studied at a university in the middle of Seoul, South  Korea. He decided to study at Linfield for two semesters because he wanted to experience somewhere different from his university back at home.

“I also wanted to experience small classes,” said Park, who is a business major. “The biggest class that I am taking has 14 students. The major classes in Korea have at least 70.”

Park is happy that the professors here at Linfield know his name, because in his university in Korea, professors teach about three classes a day, each with 70 or more students.

“I also wanted it to be a private school not a public school,” Park said about his decision to attend Linfield.

A senior at his university had also studied abroad at Linfield and recommended it to Park.

“He said that Linfield was good,” Park said, “that it was a small college, and the people were kind.”

After this year, Park will return to South Korea and finish his schooling. Credits can be easy to transfer, but if there are no classes in South Korea that matches his classes at Linfield, Park will have to look at the syllabi and curriculums of two classes to persuade the university to give him credit.

Stian Melheim

For senior  Stian Melheim, also known as Steve, this is his last year in college. He came to study abroad at Linfield from Norway.

“I chose the U.S. because people here are open-minded and interested in each other,” Melheim said. “In my home, people aren’t nearly as social.”

Melheim also explained that he did not face much of a cultural shock, having learned about the United States of America’s culture through movies and TV shows in Norway.

The hardest task Melheim had to confront quickly became all the homework he has received from classes here.

“In college in Norway, you don’t do homework. Most of the courses just have finals,” Melheim said. “I hadn’t done homework since 2006. You sort of have to do it in a specific way. Mostly, it’s the whole time management thing. It might be easier for someone who is a first year in college.”

This summer, when Melheim graduates he plans to move back to Norway. Melheim is still unsure of what he will do after school.

“I will probably try to find a job,” Melheim said. “I might go for a masters later, but I want to get an income first.”

Xiaochun “Amanda” Ma

Linfield isn’t the first place that freshman Xiochuan “Amanda” Ma has studied abroad.

She attended a public school in Minnesota and a Catholic private school Wisconsin her junior and senior year respectively. Ma was born in China and lived in the city of Jinan before studying abroad.

She chose Linfield College during her senior year in Wisconsin because she’d heard about it from a family friend.  The financial aid here at Linfield also made it an easy choice.

“I was just like why not,” Ma said about her decision to attend Linfield, “since I was already familiar with the educational system here.”

Ma enjoys the liberal atmosphere that the Northwest has to offer. At her Catholic private school in Wisconsin, she attended mass with the rest of the class. At Linfield, there are no religious obligations.

Ma spends every summer by returning to China with her family.

With the experience from her time abroad it made her used to living in the United States.

“It’s hard to go back to China,” Ma said.

Ma finds time zones in the United States interesting because China has one time zone based on its capital city, Beijing.

“I have a friend in Florida,” Ma said, “and even in the same country it is two hours of time difference.”

Gilberto Galvez/Features editor

Gilberto Galvez can be reached at linfieldreviewfeatures@gmail.com

Effect of literature in the WWII trenches

 While the English department was hosting its annual undergraduate literature conference on Nov. 1, guest speakers attended and lectured for the event.

One of which is the Instructor of Composition and Literature for Portland Community College.

Nicholas Hengen Fox spoke in honor of this year’s Program for Liberal Arts and Civic Engagement  with the theme of “Legacies of War” in mind with his lecture, “Reading & Weeping: Books in the Trenches During World War II.”

Fox discussed soldiers’ emotional effects by pocket novels they received from the Council on Books and Wartime.

The CBW provided stories that were approved by the army for soldiers to read during service. This publishing movement resulted in the paperback boom during the war. Armed Service Editions, which are smaller and portable books, were popularized and easier for soldiers to take into battle.

“Books went everywhere and soldiers acted positively,” Fox said. Popular titles such as “The Great Gatsby” by F. Scott Fitzgerald and “A Tree Grows in Brooklyn” by Betty Smith were a part of the post-war counterculture that soldiers were able to indulge in.

Fox read fan mail that authors received and analyzed the letters. Delving into how readers interpret stories personally Fox examines one case, a military man named Davis Clifton. Clifton read Smith’s novel and wrote the author an emotional response, “[Clifton is] a zombie that feels joy and gratitude, it’s an emotional transformation,” Fox said.

Fox said that according to a study, those who read literature are able to understand people better. With Fox’s focus on the idea of self-expression that contradicts the stereotypes of men in the military by their book choices.

“A reader gets intense emotional reactions because there are things going on in your life which you can relate to,” Fox said.

Professor of the English department, Alexander Runciman, commented after Fox’s lecture during question and answering, “Fiction is an escapist idea; it is on the spot treatment for Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder with the circulation of books. It is a full reality compared to a pretty damn restricted one.”

Rosa Johnson / Copy editor

Rosa Johnson can be reached at linfieldreviewcopyed@gmail.com.