Category Archives: Opinion

It’s not all about the quarterbacks

Today’s football world, in both the NCAA and the NFL, is a quarterback-centric one. It’s become a common belief among coaches and players that having a marquee player behind the gun could instantly take a program from the pits to the top, or at the very least make a big impact on the team’s win-loss percentage. Four quarterbacks were taken in the top 12 picks of the NFL draft last June, causing ESPN to declare the 2011-12 season “the Year of the Quarterback.”

But is having a stud under the gun really the most important thing for a football team to have? Maybe I’m just jaded by all the media hype heaped on this rookie class of quarterbacks, but I can’t help but think that this much emphasis on a team’s play caller is completely absurd.

Alabama won a BCS national championship in 2010 and their quarterback, Greg McElroy, only completed six of 12 passes for 58 yards. The Tide defense was the difference maker that night, snagging four picks and knocking Colt McCoy out of the game in the first quarter.

With all that said, I will admit that I thought Linfield football’s preseason ranking of No. 7 from www.d3football.com was probably too high, due in no small part to the turnover at the quarterback position. Yes, the defense was going to be as strong as ever, and yes, the offense still had some potent weapons at its disposal. The special teams unit had grown substantially with young talent last season, too. Don’t get me wrong, I still held that we deserved a top-15 ranking, to be sure. But I felt that having to acclimate a new quarterback to fill Aaron Boehme’s all-American sized shoes was going to be no easy task.

Perhaps just to show those like me who had their doubts as to the lofty ranking, the Linfield defense put on an absolute clinic against Cal Lutheran on Sept. 7. This is a team, mind you, with a tailback that ripped the Linfield D for 100 yards in a single quarter and a receiver who racked up 200-plus yards the last time they met. The defense was overwhelming on every drive, every down and every moment they had to take advantage of.

Meanwhile, a tailback who only rushed for 227 yards in the entire 2010-11 season suddenly slashed open a mighty Kingsmen defense for 164 yards and two scores. Josh Hill’s breakout performance has given the run game some legitimacy; Linfield hasn’t had a back top 150 yards since 2003. And this wasn’t Lewis & Clark, folks; this was a No. 16 ranked program that has played us hard for the past two seasons in five total match ups, none of them complete blowouts.

Under the gun, new starting quarterback Mickey Inns was okay. He made a few mistakes, picked up a handful of yards, managed the offense pretty well for a first-timer and showed some flashes of brilliance in open space in play action situations. He’s not Boehme, but who cares? Nobody expects him to be. I’ve been watching this guy play ball for six years, three here and three at Gresham High School, so believe me when I say he’s going to thrive in Coach Smith’s offense when he gains greater mastery of it.

My point is, teams win championships, not quarterbacks. Our coaching staff is first-rate; the secondary is lights-out; we’ve got a suddenly revitalized ground game. These are all important. But after seeing what our boys can do collectively with the personnel they have around this season, I know this team is perfectly capable of competing for a deep playoff run or, knock on wood, a national title as long as they play to their potential, as Coach Smith loves to say. I’m not booking my tickets to the Stagg Bowl yet but hey, who’s to say I won’t start putting money aside, just in case.

______________________________________________________________________________________________
Chris Forrer/Sports columnist
Chris Forrer can be reached at linfieldreviewsports@gmail.com.

The Internet is destroying print tradition

When I was younger, I used to love going to the bookstore and spending hours picking out the perfect book to spend my allowance on. Bookstores are still one of my favorite places to go. I love the feeling of holding a new book and turning the crisp pages. I love the smell of the ink and paper, and I love the satisfaction of turning pages as you venture further and further into the story.

The small pleasure of books is lost to many people as they run from class to class or from activity to job. Reading a book is a leisure that most people don’t have time for anymore. Very few take a moment to relax, pick up a book and get lost in another world.

I also love being online. I have a blog that I’m on for multiple hours a day. I enjoy finding pictures, quotes and news stories that inspire me and sharing them with everybody else. I use it like a journal to write about things,  as well. The things the Internet can dig up astound me. You can learn so much just by clicking on links and reading articles on websites.

My love for books and the Internet, however, does not coincide. I am deeply saddened by the swift move of print media sources to online ones. One of my favorite bookstores, Borders, closed this summer. I was shocked when I heard that the entire chain was closing and moving to the Internet. The trend of print media is quickly changing to everything being available electronically.

E-readers, Kindles, Nooks and other electronic “books” are taking over and printed books are getting kicked to the curb. Why? They’re portable, you can fit hundreds of books on one piece of technology and you don’t have to leave your home to get the books.

I’m terrified that in a few years, all media will be only available online. Reading a book, newspaper or magazine loses its allure when you stare at a computer screen. The physical sensations are completely lost. I do not believe that reading a print book and reading a book on an e-reader is the same thing. I don’t think unfolding and browsing a newspaper are the same as scanning a website for links to news stories.

I plan on going into journalism, and I have to accept that my career will probably  be online. I’ve always dreamed of holding my own publication in my hands, but I’m starting to see that this might not happen. I understand as a mass communication student that being connected on the Internet is important. I even had to create a Twitter account, which I swore I’d never do. As long as I get to write for a magazine or newspaper, I’ll be happy. It still doesn’t quite compare, however, to the physical thing.

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________
Kelsey Sutton/Copy Chief

Kelsey Sutton can be reached at linfieldreviewcopy@gmail.com.

Bailey’s mailbox is open to your sex wellness questions

First of all, I would like to welcome everyone back or to Linfield’s campus. For those who don’t know, Dear Bailey is a column similar to Dear Abby. It is designed to answer students’ questions about sex. Last year, I mainly wrote about sexual education. This year, it will be open to any type of sexual related questions students may have.

I have heard it from my professors, as I’m sure many of you have as well, if you have a question, someone else probably has the same one. Aside from the many resources around Linfield, this column is helpful because it reaches all students where many may have similar questions. As I said last year, this isn’t high school and abstinence isn’t the theme of human health courses, sexual education or everyone’s sexual practices. There are many rumors about sex that aren’t true. If you want to know if something is true or not, it is a great idea to send your questions in.

In the past, I have talked about a few different subjects. I talked about the most commonly spread sexually transmitted disease (STI), human papillomavirus (HPV). Many people do not know they are carriers, which can lead to easy and accidental spreading of the disease. A good defense against it, and many other STIs, is using a condom. There is also an immunization shot available. HPV  cause some types of cancer.

I have also talked about the Morning After pill. I want it to be clear that this is NOT the abortion pill. It contains the same hormones that birth control pills and patches release to prevent a pregnancy in the beginning. A prescription is not needed for this pill, but it is fairly pricey.

There was a bill that was put up for debate in the spring that would have cut federal funding for Planned Parenthood. I decided to talk about it because I felt that it was related. Many students, from Linfield and other colleges, use Planned Parenthood as a resource for information and contraception. It also has an immense impact on the availability of testing for women and men who cannot afford it. A big argument to cut funding was that Planned Parenthood provides abortions. While this is true it is a small portion of what it provides to the public. Abortions are also not paid for by federal funding but by private funding donated for that specific use.

If you have a question, please send it in. If there is something that many students are wondering about and you know they are, send it in. Questions can be sent to Bailey Linfield Review Unit # A518 or emailed to linfieldreviewbailey@gmail.com.

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________
Bailey/Columnist
Dear Bailey can be reached at linfieldreviewbailey@gmail.com.

Please be respectful of your dormmates

Many of the students attending Linfield live on campus and those who don’t have most likely lived on campus at some point during their college careers.

Living in the dorms is an interesting experience. A lot of the privacy and comforts of living at home are tossed out the window. While living in the dorms certainly has its fun times, there are other times when it would be nice if people would be a little more courteous to one another.

For example, it’s really hard to get to sleep when someone on another floor is playing a video game at an extremely high volume level. It seems doubtful that anyone would need to blast the volume that loud in order to play their game.

I think that there are some rules of etiquette that everyone should follow in order to coexist in such tight quarters. First, for those who enjoy playing video games or watching television at night, please be respectful of those who have an 8:15 a.m. class the next day. I understand that not everyone has to get up that early, but it’s not necessary to turn the volume up so high that people in the next hall can hear you. Be respectful of quiet hours and turn down the volume to a more reasonable level.

Another much needed guideline that everyone should follow is to clean up after yourself in the bathroom. No one wants to step into the shower and discover a massive wad of hair. Also, since we are now college students, please flush the toilets. It’s a pretty simple concept: push down the silver handle attached to the toilet. If everyone cleans up their own mess we can all have a more enjoyable bathroom experience. This rule should go for the kitchen as well. After using kitchen utensils, please clean them and put them away. The kitchen is for everyone living in the hall to use, not just for one’s personal use.

Sundays are a busy day in the laundry room. This means waiting for a washer or dryer to open up. Sometimes, people will take  another person’s clothes out of the washer or dryer and pile them on a table, sometimes causing separate piles to be mixed up. It’s understandable why people do this, as no one wants to wait all day for a washer or dryer to open up, but we need to be more respectful of others’ belongings. A better system is needed. Instead of piling clothes on a table, where piles can mix, we could have bins to set belongings in instead.

Living in the dorms is a unique, eye-opening experience. I believe that if everyone was a little more respectful to each other, it would make living with so many people a little easier.

___________________________________________________________________________________________________
Meghan O’Rourke/Opinion editor
Meghan O’Rourke can be reached at linfieldreviewopinion@gmail.com.

Online art theft destroys creative rights

We all get the plagiarism talk. Every school year, in every class, every teacher gives us a list of consequences if anyone dares to copy someone else’s work. We’ve all heard it a thousand times: “Your work must be your own!” Come on, we’re in college.  Does anyone really need to be warned about this anymore?

But the truth is, this is actually an important message. I don’t think people realize how devastating it is to discover that someone else has stolen your work and has claimed it as their own, whether it’s an essay, a novel, a song or a painting.

Last July and August, more than 300 members of deviantArt.com discovered that one or more of their artworks had been stolen and put up for sale on a website called Art4Love.com and its backup site, MarkYourSpot.com.

The stolen works of art were overpriced and listed as original oil paintings, and the website did not include any of the artists’ names or acknowledge that the art was created by anyone other than the site’s founder, Chad “Love” Lieberman.

He didn’t stop at art theft, either. Lieberman “wrote” a book called “Creative Warriors Walk Alone,” which is astoundingly similar to a book titled “The Business Side of Creativity” by Cameron S. Foote. I even found an article about copyright for artists online written by Lieberman. The irony that someone like this would write a Q-and-A article about copyright only gets better when you realize that he didn’t actually write it at all. The article was actually written by Sarah Feingold and was copyrighted by Alan Bamberger. All Lieberman had to do was copy, paste and type his own name over Feingold’s.

As an amateur artist and writer myself, I know how much work goes into an original creation. Making art is a lot more than just splashing some paint on a canvas. Just like writing is more than putting words down on a page and making music is more than plucking a string or making noise with your mouth. When you create something, you alter and edit it until it’s perfect. You spend hours, or even days, working on it until you’re satisfied. Then, to discover that someone has copied it, not even bothering to change it to make it look like it’s theirs and to realize that they are getting all the credit…

Well, what would you do?

Art4Love.com and MarkYourSpot.com have been taken down, presumably by Lieberman. According to posts online the members of deviantArt assume that Lieberman is trying to hide any evidence, and they are urging other ‘deviants’ to spread the word. There is a movement among the victimized artists to sue Lieberman and/or Art4Love.com, and frankly, I hope they do it. No one should profit from stealing someone else’s work.

We all get the plagiarism talk. Every school year, in every class, every teacher gives us a list of consequences if anyone dares to copy someone else’s work. We’ve all heard it a thousand times: “Your work must be your own!” Come on, we’re in college.  Does anyone really need to be warned about this anymore?

But the truth is, this is actually an important message. I don’t think people realize how devastating it is to discover that someone else has stolen your work and has claimed it as their own, whether it’s an essay, a novel, a song or a painting.

Last July and August, more than 300 members of deviantArt.com discovered that one or more of their artworks had been stolen and put up for sale on a website called Art4Love.com and its backup site, MarkYourSpot.com.

The stolen works of art were overpriced and listed as original oil paintings, and the website did not include any of the artists’ names or acknowledge that the art was created by anyone other than the site’s founder, Chad “Love” Lieberman.

He didn’t stop at art theft, either. Lieberman “wrote” a book called “Creative Warriors Walk Alone,” which is astoundingly similar to a book titled “The Business Side of Creativity” by Cameron S. Foote. I even found an article about copyright for artists online written by Lieberman. The irony that someone like this would write a Q-and-A article about copyright only gets better when you realize that he didn’t actually write it at all. The article was actually written by Sarah Feingold and was copyrighted by Alan Bamberger. All Lieberman had to do was copy, paste and type his own name over Feingold’s.

As an amateur artist and writer myself, I know how much work goes into an original creation. Making art is a lot more than just splashing some paint on a canvas. Just like writing is more than putting words down on a page and making music is more than plucking a string or making noise with your mouth. When you create something, you alter and edit it until it’s perfect. You spend hours, or even days, working on it until you’re satisfied. Then, to discover that someone has copied it, not even bothering to change it to make it look like it’s theirs and to realize that they are getting all the credit…

Well, what would you do?

We all get the plagiarism talk. Every school year, in every class, every teacher gives us a list of consequences if anyone dares to copy someone else’s work. We’ve all heard it a thousand times: “Your work must be your own!” Come on, we’re in college.  Does anyone really need to be warned about this anymore?

But the truth is, this is actually an important message. I don’t think people realize how devastating it is to discover that someone else has stolen your work and has claimed it as their own, whether it’s an essay, a novel, a song or a painting.

Last July and August, more than 300 members of deviantArt.com discovered that one or more of their artworks had been stolen and put up for sale on a website called Art4Love.com and its backup site, MarkYourSpot.com.

The stolen works of art were overpriced and listed as original oil paintings, and the website did not include any of the artists’ names or acknowledge that the art was created by anyone other than the site’s founder, Chad “Love” Lieberman.

He didn’t stop at art theft, either. Lieberman “wrote” a book called “Creative Warriors Walk Alone,” which is astoundingly similar to a book titled “The Business Side of Creativity” by Cameron S. Foote. I even found an article about copyright for artists online written by Lieberman. The irony that someone like this would write a Q-and-A article about copyright only gets better when you realize that he didn’t actually write it at all. The article was actually written by Sarah Feingold and was copyrighted by Alan Bamberger. All Lieberman had to do was copy, paste and type his own name over Feingold’s.

As an amateur artist and writer myself, I know how much work goes into an original creation. Making art is a lot more than just splashing some paint on a canvas. Just like writing is more than putting words down on a page and making music is more than plucking a string or making noise with your mouth. When you create something, you alter and edit it until it’s perfect. You spend hours, or even days, working on it until you’re satisfied. Then, to discover that someone has copied it, not even bothering to change it to make it look like it’s theirs and to realize that they are getting all the credit…

Well, what would you do?

Art4Love.com and MarkYourSpot.com have been taken down, presumably by Lieberman. According to posts online the members of deviantArt assume that Lieberman is trying to hide any evidence, and they are urging other ‘deviants’ to spread the word. There is a movement among the victimized artists to sue Lieberman and/or Art4Love.com, and frankly, I hope they do it. No one should profit from stealing someone else’s work.

___________________________________________________________________________________________________
Sharon Gollery/Culture editor
Sharon Gollery can be reached at linfieldreviewculture@gmail.com.