Monthly Archives: October 2009

Area director recognized for sincere service

Cindy Nguyen – For the Review. Delane Hein, Linfield area director for judicial affairs, presented at the Northwest Association of Student Affairs Professionals conference held in Sunriver, Ore., Oct. 22-24.
Two awards were presented at the ceremony: the Otis McCreery Outstanding Service Award and the May Dunn Innovative Program Award. As a tradition, the McCreery award recipient presents a speech the following year.
In 2008, Hein was honored with the McCreery award, an achievement that has a long history of deans as recipients.
“I actually didn’t know that I was nominated for the award,” Hein said. “I was very surprised when I heard my name announced.”
Jeff Mackay, associate dean of students and director of Residence Life, attended the conference to witness this year’s festivities.
“We have worked together for 10 years,” Mackay said “She brings compassion and insight to student affairs at Linfield and is a wonderful addition to the staff.”
Along with the honor of receiving the McCreery Award last year, Hein announced the nominees this year and presented the closing speech.
“It felt humbling and required a lot of reflection and thought,” Hein said. “The attendees of these conferences tend to be knowledgeable, and it was difficult because the topic of the speech was open to anything. It was about learning competencies of the heart. You can’t serve others unless you really do it in a sincere and authentic way. Otherwise the outcomes aren’t valuable.”
The conference is held annually for NWASAP members and all college or university employers in the Northwest.
The McCreery award was established in 1987 and is named for the first president of the NWASAP, formally as known as the Northwest College Personnel Association, in honor of his contributions.
Award recipients display integrity and stature while demonstrating ability in such a way that fellow faculty members, staff and alumni would take pride in their recognition.

Bandwidth increases Internet Efficiency

Yin Xiao – News editor. Integrated Technology Services made a significant improvement to the campus Internet connection Oct. 22.
Linfield’s Internet bandwidth increased from 60 millions of bits per second (a measure of bandwidth on a telecommunications medium) to 100 Mbps. Bandwidth is defined as data transfer rate in computer networks.
“[Internet demand] at Linfield increases all the time,” Irv Wiswall, ITS chief technology officer, said. “A year and a half ago, we increased bandwidth from 30 Mbps to 60. Now it looks like we need to increase it again.”
ITS monitors Linfield students’ Internet usage from period to period, from an hourly graph to a yearly graph. Inbound lines on these graphs represent bandwidth when traffic is coming into Web pages. Outbound lines indicate the amount of bandwidth relayed back by Web pages.
In recent months, traffic continued to reach the network’s maximum allowance of 60 Mbps. Wiswall connected with ITS providers to discuss the necessity of a bandwidth increase to 100 Mbps.
Wiswall said he decided to add bandwidth after he discovered ITS only needed to pay a little extra money: The cost for 60 Mbps is $4,310 per month, while the cost for 100 Mbps is $4,800 per month.
The main benefit of additional Internet bandwidth is that Web pages load faster.
“We will still watch these graphs,” Wiswall said. “If traffic keeps hitting 100 Mbps, we will ask to find more money to add [Internet bandwidth]. As you know, things keep growing.”
In 1992, Internet bandwidth at Linfield was 0.15 Mbps. In 1995, when Linfield created its own Web page, it was 1.5 Mbps.
These days, students on campus have noticed a change when surfing the Internet, especially those who spend a lot of time online.
“I couldn’t tell if it’s faster in the HPs because of less people or increasing bandwidth, but loading Web pages is much faster in the music center when I am on Facebook and watching TV shows on Hulu,” junior Garrett Garceau, who lives in the HPs, said.
Junior Stephen Guttridge, a computer game enthusiast, also noticed the increased bandwidth’s effect on Web page loading times. He said he was excited that the speed of the Linfield’s Internet connection is now equal to that at his home.

3,000 miles from home, Forensics steals the show

P.J. Wilson – For the Review. Even though Linfield was the only school not within 150 miles of Boston, its Forensics team walked away with three first-place awards for individuals and placed third overall in team events during a tournament at Suffolk University on Oct. 24.
This was the speech and debate team’s second tournament of the season.
Linfield competed against 12 schools from Oregon, Massachusetts, New York, New Hampshire and Maine, including Harvard University and the University of Maryland.
The forensics tournament involved multiple events, including a speech portion, where a team member is given a quote and then has seven minutes to prepare a speech about it, and a platform, in which a team member creates a persuasive speech with only 10 minutes to prepare.
“I think they had an amazing resolve,” Jackson Miller, Forensics team coach and professor of theatre and communication arts, said. “It’s a great way to start off the season, and it just shows how much work they’ve put in.”
At some tournaments, speech and debate are both portions of the overall tournament, but, in this case, the teams only competed in the speech segment.
The winners of these events included freshman Chris Forrer, who took first place in After Dinner, first place third in Program of Oral Interpretation and third place in Duo; senior Stephanie Heuser, who took fourth place in Dramatic Interpretation and fifth place in Prose; junior Colin Jones, who took second place in Rhetorical Criticism; junior Darren Valenta, who took second place in Prose; sophomore Nick Zimmers, who took third place in Poetry; and sophomore Rachel Mills, who took third place in Duo.
“It’s always nice to travel to a different region and see how they do speech and debate there,” Jones said. “It’s fun, and you get to meet people from other schools, and the travel aspect is wonderful.”
The Forensic team’s first tournament, held Oct. 10-11 at Lewis & Clark College in Portland, was also a success.
Among 25 different schools from Washington, Idaho, Louisiana and California, Linfield received five first-place awards. This tournament featured both speech and debate.
The individual awards included senior Kaitlyn Vannoy, who took first place in Forensics Criticism; Heuser, who took third place in Novice Prose; senior Kyle Helm, who took first place in Novice Prose; Zimmers and Valenta, who took first place in Open Duo; Forrer, who took fourth place in Open ADS; Jones, who took second place in Open CA; Valenta, who took first place in Open Prose; freshman Kole Kracaw as sixth place speaker; Jones as first-place speaker; Vannoy and Zimmers as semifinalists; and Jones and Kracaw as finalists.
Linfield’s next tournament will take place Nov. 6 at Lower Columbia College in Longview, Wash.

Campus events observe diversity

Jessica Prokop – Review staff writer. The Linfield Activities Board switched its event schedule this year, having Diversity Week run Oct. 26-30, the earliest it has ever been held.
LAB decided that it would be easier to move Diversity Week, normally slated for Spring Semester, to the fall to avoid competition with other events, lectures and guest speakers usually scheduled during April.
Rovinghorse Henna provided henna tattoo art Oct. 26 to begin the week’s festivities. Junior Lauren Funtanilla, LAB cultural events chair, said she asked the henna artists back to campus because of the overwhelming turnout of more than 150 students they brought the previous year. Rovinghorse Henna drew approximately 110 tattoos that afternoon.
The movie “Milk” was screened that evening, which was followed by a lecture about the diversity of sexual orientation.
About 15 Fusion Club members and 35 outside students came to see the movie and participate in the discussion.
Fusion Club president Jesse Aerni invented the idea for this event. He said he planned it for last year’s Diversity Week but couldn’t fit it into the schedule.
“We decided on this movie because it is politically aware of the diversity in sexual orientation, and it just seemed appropriate for the discussion,” Aerni said.
Guest speaker Matt Glowacki presented his lecture, “Diversity according to ‘South Park’ and ‘Family Guy,’” in Ice Auditorium on Oct. 27. Glowacki focused on characters’ differences by singling out how they are exaggerated within the context of their respective programs and the reasoning behind it.
Glowacki said he and his friends watched “Family Guy” and “South Park” and that he understood and laughed at jokes that his friends didn’t. So, he decided to try use diversity to help others comprehend what he found humorous.
“Diversity is learning from people’s differences and getting to know people on the inside,” Glowacki said.
LAB discovered Glowacki at the National Association for Campus Activities, where comedians, guest lecturers and other artists perform and are booked for college shows.
The Linfield College Chaplaincy next put on a “Discovery of Faiths” panel discussion Oct. 28. The lecture featured three religious representatives who discussed their religious backgrounds and beliefs.
Diversity Week events culminated Oct. 29 with “Diversity Week Celebrates Culture.” The cultural show is an annual event hosted by the International Club in partnership with LAB. It highlighted a variety of multicultural routines, such as dance and musical numbers, as well as a fashion show.
After the show, a dinner featuring international foods prepared by students in a buffet style was held in Jonasson Hall. Contributions from restaurants, such as Geraldi’s Italian Café, El Primo and Thai Country, were also available.

Run, dig into new clubs

Hunter Deiglmeier – Review staff writer. The Linfield Activities Board switched its event schedule this year, having Diversity Week run Oct. 26-30, the earliest it has ever been held.
LAB decided that it would be easier to move Diversity Week, normally slated for Spring Semester, to the fall to avoid competition with other events, lectures and guest speakers usually scheduled during April.
Rovinghorse Henna provided henna tattoo art Oct. 26 to begin the week’s festivities. Junior Lauren Funtanilla, LAB cultural events chair, said she asked the henna artists back to campus because of the overwhelming turnout of more than 150 students they brought the previous year. Rovinghorse Henna drew approximately 110 tattoos that afternoon.
The movie “Milk” was screened that evening, which was followed by a lecture about the diversity of sexual orientation.
About 15 Fusion Club members and 35 outside students came to see the movie and participate in the discussion.
Fusion Club president Jesse Aerni invented the idea for this event. He said he planned it for last year’s Diversity Week but couldn’t fit it into the schedule.
“We decided on this movie because it is politically aware of the diversity in sexual orientation, and it just seemed appropriate for the discussion,” Aerni said.
Guest speaker Matt Glowacki presented his lecture, “Diversity according to ‘South Park’ and ‘Family Guy,’” in Ice Auditorium on Oct. 27. Glowacki focused on characters’ differences by singling out how they are exaggerated within the context of their respective programs and the reasoning behind it.
Glowacki said he and his friends watched “Family Guy” and “South Park” and that he understood and laughed at jokes that his friends didn’t. So, he decided to try use diversity to help others comprehend what he found humorous.
“Diversity is learning from people’s differences and getting to know people on the inside,” Glowacki said.
LAB discovered Glowacki at the National Association for Campus Activities, where comedians, guest lecturers and other artists perform and are booked for college shows.
The Linfield College Chaplaincy next put on a “Discovery of Faiths” panel discussion Oct. 28. The lecture featured three religious representatives who discussed their religious backgrounds and beliefs.
Diversity Week events culminated Oct. 29 with “Diversity Week Celebrates Culture.” The cultural show is an annual event hosted by the International Club in partnership with LAB. It highlighted a variety of multicultural routines, such as dance and musical numbers, as well as a fashion show.
After the show, a dinner featuring international foods prepared by students in a buffet style was held in Jonasson Hall. Contributions from restaurants, such as Geraldi’s Italian Café, El Primo and Thai Country, were also available.