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Journals from Rikkyo University, Japan

2009-09-25 Looking at the Positive

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Rikkyo University

Now that I have been living in the Rikkyo University International Dormitory (RUID) for a couple weeks, I have started to get used to it. But when I first moved in, it was very hard to make the transition from spending a month of freedom, to having to follow dorm rules. When I lived with Meredith in Higashi-Nagasaki for that month, we were able to wake up whenever we pleased, do whatever we pleased, and come back as late as we wanted to. At RUID, if I want to have breakfast, I have to wake up between 6:30-8:30am in order to eat. If I wake up late, I have to go buy my own food. Also at RUID, there is a 12am curfew. If we are not back in the dorm before Ryo-cho locks the doors, we cannot get into the dorm. Another thing that is really hard for me is not being able to go visit my friends in their rooms. Girls are not allowed to enter boys rooms, and vice versa. The only time that we are allowed to meet with each other is in the dining hall during meals. Even though the rules of RUID are really strict, I am glad that I live here, because I have met so many new people that I would have probably never met had I not lived here. Another great thing about living in the international dorm is that it really is an INTERNATIONAL dorm. I have made friends with people from Belgium, Canada, France, England, Thailand, and Australia, as well as other Americans; and of course, I have met a lot of new Japanese people. It is so hard to remember everyones name, though! Another thing that was hard for me was taking the placement test at Rikkyo. Even though I did not place as high as I would have liked, I cannot change into a higher level and I cannot take the test again to try to get into a higher level. Even though it is frustrating, I had to accept it. But because I got into such a low level, I decided that I would spend most of my time studying for the Japanese Language Proficiency Test: Level 2. Level 2 of the JLPT is the second hardest one, and I have heard from my friends that have taken it that it is extremely difficult. But even though there is a chance that I wont pass it, I am still going to do my best to learn as many new things as I can in order to pass it. Tiffany Ross

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