Anna Klicznik - McMinnville, Language Teaching Assistant, German

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Walker 322
503-883-2249

aklicznik@linfield.edu

Although she is a primary school teacher, Anna worked in different fields of education. During her work with kindergartners, pupils, parents, and infants, Anna’s interest in sociology and psychology intensified.
Interesting Fact: Anna considers herself as adventurous and as a world traveler. You will find her outdoors doing sport or just enjoying the sun and nature while reading.

Emina Mušanović - Assistant Professor

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Walker 319
503-883-2476

emusanov@linfield.edu

In her courses, Emina Musanovic explores the literary and filmic imagination of borders, place, environment, and technology—always with a critical eye to intersections of race, gender, sexuality, migration background, and socio-economics. As a former war refugee, she privileges transnational approaches, focusing, for example, on diaspora literatures and, in particular, on narratives of forced displacement. By thus reading German literature and film through a global context, she also questions what constitutes national literatures in the 20th and 21st centuries.

With her research, she seeks to make substantial contributions to the question of what it means to engage with literary and filmic texts in times of transnational environmental crises and large-scale displacements of people due to economic crises and violent conflicts. To this end, she takes up texts as complex, poetic encounters with diverse ecologies. Specifically, she asks how literary and filmic texts shift boundaries and foreground the embeddedness of societies within broader ecologies of the world. How do they forge alliances between the affected oppressed humans and nonhumans to promote advocacy on behalf of both across differences?

Learn more about Professor Mušanović

Peter Nichols Richardson - Professor of German

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Walker 322
503-883-2249

prichard@linfield.edu

Peter Richardson has been teaching at Linfield since 1980. He specializes in language pedagogy, linguistics, Latin, folklore, German literature and American English. For one month every summer, the 2009 Oregon Professor of the Year visits a tiny village in the Swiss Alps, where he transcribes hundred-year-old documents to be bequeathed to the local museum. As of 2009, he has transcribed nearly 1,300 of these love letters, poorhouse documents, cattle certificates, gravestone inscriptions and more. He is known for his interactive, one-on-one teaching style, which includes bringing in cowbells and butter churns to class to illustrate the lives of Swiss farmers. Dr. Richardson has published several works on Germanic philology and linguistics, folklore literature, applied linguistics, the Swiss German and academic administration. In his spare time, he enjoys reading, hiking, gardening and admiring his ancient Mercedes.

Learn more about Professor Richardson