Linfield College | Adult Degree Program

Navigation
Linfield Home » ADP Home » Course Details

Course Details

INQUIRY SEMINAR

Course Number: INQS-125

Course Description: INQS 125 01 The Tragic Side of Life - What isıspecifically tragic about a tragedy? How isı"tragic" different from "very sad" or ı"dramatic"? Through discussion of the ascriptionıof the name "tragedy" to several plays, fromı"Oedipus Tyrannus" to "Exit the King," studentsıwill speculate about what they have to say aboutısuffering, transcendence and fate, as well asısociety and gender, and more generally, aboutıhuman self-understanding. Students will alsoıexplore the presence of a tragic dimension inıother creative venues. 4 credits.
ı
INQS 125 02 Multicultural America - Studentsıwill develop a deeper understanding of both theıconcept of pluralism and multi-culturalism andıthe impact these ideas have on our lives. Defineıthe term multiculturalism, and negotiate itsımeaning within the context of our ownıgeographical, sociological, economic, andıpolitical frameworks. 4 credits.
ı
INQS 125 03 Meditation: From Monks to ModernıTimes - What is meditation? How does it affectıthe brain, behavior, and general well being? Andıhow can we know? Increasingly, techniques forıcultivating mindfulness drawn from Buddhism andıother religious traditions are being studiedıscientifically and applied in many differentıcontexts. Focusing primarily on the study ofıBuddhist techniques, students will explore theıtopic of meditation, its ap-parent effects on theıbrain, and the various contexts in which itsıpractice has entered the mainstream of ourımodern, globalized culture. 4 credits.
ı
INQS 125 04 Living Well, Living Long -ıStudents will investigate factors contributing toılongevity, with an emphasis on culture,ılifestyle, and spiritual influences. Examineıpersonal lifestyle choices and behavior changeıtheory as they relate to health and well being inıthe present and for the future. 4 credits.
ı
INQS 125 05 Rock 'n' Roll - Say rock 'n'ıroll,ıand people think of songs, bands, or artists.ıRock 'n' roll is also about politics, society,ıand ways of living. Rock 'n' roll shows peopleıhow to talk, dress, and interact with others andıthe world. Rock 'n' roll showcases freeıexpression, youth culture, and civilıdisobedience. Rock 'n' roll is also aımulti-billion dollar industry that mani-festsıcultural conformity and economic dominance. Thisıclass examines rock 'n' roll as music,ıexpression, and cultural subver-sion, andıexplores how rock'n'roll products drive theıengines of commerce. 4 credits.
ı
INQS 125 06 The Genius of East Asia: AnıIntroduction to the Cultures of China, Korea andıJapan - An introduction to the philosophicalıfoundations of East Asian culture and examinesıthe cultural highlights of the three majorıcivilizations in East Asia: China, Korea andıJapan. Examine the visual arts, music andılitera-ture of these three civilizations. Allıworks will be read in English translation and noıbackground in an Asian language is required. ı4 credits.
ı
INQS 125 07 Complementary Healing Methods -ıInıthe United States, there is an increasing use ofıcomplementary and alterna-tive medical techniquesıin the treatment of various illnesses. Some ofıthese methods have their origins in otherıcultures. Examine the efficacy of complementaryıhealing methods such as intercessory prayer,ıhumor, and animals as well as exploring heal-ingımethods used in other cultures around the world.ı4 credits.
ı
INQS 125 08 Women's Voices: Demanding theıVote - Explore why and how individuals in theılateınineteenth and early twen-tieth centuries createdınew opportunities for women to speak in public,ıforged the Woman Suffrage Movement, andıcampaigned for an amendment to the U.S.ıConstitution that guarantees women the right toıvote. Investigate the life, work and speeches ofıSusan B. Anthony, Carrie Chapman Catt, AbigailıScott Duniway, Eliza-beth Cady Stanton, SojournerıTruth, and others. 4 credits.
ı
INQS 125 09 Game Theory in Popular Culture -ıAn investigation of game theory through film,ıtelevision, and fiction. This course exploresıideas such as perfect information, prisoner'sıdilemma, and volunteer's dilemma. Students willılearn the basic mathemat-ical underpinnings ofıgame theory and then apply these concepts toısocietal questions of conflict and cooperation. ı4 credits.
ı
INQS 125 10 What to Listen to in the World -ıMusic is the product and expression of allıhumanity. Is all sound music? Why should weılisten to music? How should we listen to music?ıWhere is music performed and for what reasons?ıWhat impacts our listening choices? Who makesımusic and who should support the creation ofımusic and why? What effect does music have on usıas we listen? How do other cultures of the worldıperceive, produce, and organize music and how areıtheir listening choices similar to and differentıfrom ours and why? How does music connect us withıour friends, family, and the rest of the world?ıIn this Inquiry Seminar, we will explore theısounds and music of our own culture and others inıthe world. Regardless of a student's musicıbackground, this INQS will help to develop aımusic vocab-ulary to understand and to convey inıboth writing and speaking the various propertiesıof music and its impact on diverse cultures ofıthe world. Through thoughtful research andıcontemplation, students will consider and discussıthe human response to music from physical,ıemotional, intellectual, and spiritualıdirections. Through engaged inquiry, studentsıwill draw conclusions about the value music hasıfor the connection of people within their own andıother cultures. 4 credits.
ı
INQS 125 11 Demons in Our Midst: The Dead andıthe Un-Dead: The Rise of the Literary Vampireıfrom Folklore to Stoker - Study the evidenceıpresented in folklore descriptions of the deadıwho were assumed to be Vampires. Trace theıevolution of that folklore creature throughıseveral Romanticıand Victorian incarnations, and consider the riseıof this figure in the enlightened West and ourıcontinued fascination with its descendants. 4ıcredits.
ı
INQS 125 12 Language Matters - Study AmericanıEnglish and examine the influence of otherılanguages (e.g. German and Spanish) on theıdevelopment of the American idiom. Examine theırole of dialects and slang in constant linguisticırenewal. The course's main text is an informalıhistory of the United States as seen through aılinguistic lens, illuminated musically throughıintroduction of American folk songs, the texts ofıwhich often shed important light on our socialıand linguistic past. 4 credits.
ı
INQS 125 13 Four Novels of the American Westı- In this seminar we'll read and discuss threeımore-or-less conventional historical novels ofıthe American west, and one science fictionıversion that - we'll have to decide - may or mayınot relate to the first three. What novels, youıask? They are, in the order that we'll readıthem, Fools Crow, a novel immersed in NativeıAmerican culture just as that culture's way ofılife is threatened by white settlement, writtenıby Native American author James Welch; LittleıCentury, by Linfield's own Anna Keesey andıfocusing on an orphaned teenager who journeysıfrom Chicago to her cousin's town in centralıOregon; The Jump-Off Creek, Molly Gloss's novelıof a woman determined to find her ownıindependence along a creek in eastern Oregon highıcountry; and Ursula LeGuin's classic sf novel,ıpublished in 1971 and set in a fictionalıPortland, Oregon some thirty years later, TheıLathe of Heaven. What stories make our culturalıhistory? What does it matter to know some ofıthem? How do such stories inform the present? ıWe'll discuss these and similar questions byıpaying close attention to the fictional livesıwe'll encounter in these four quite compellingıbooks. 4 credits.
ı
INQS 125 14 Women Writing War - Going to warıhas long been considered the foundationalıinitiation rite of manhood, and yet women's livesıhave been deeply affected by it for just as long,ıboth directly and indirectly. In this InquiryıSeminar we will explore literary and cinematicıtexts by women that document war and the legaciesıof war across a wide spectrum of experience:ıcombat itself, familial impacts, civilian trauma,ıand long term consequences of war both on theıhome front and in the combat zones warıdevastates.
ı
INQS 125 15 In Search of the Good Life - Whatıis the "good life"? This is perhaps the deepestıhuman question. It is not only a question weıhope recipients of a liberal arts education willıask, it is also a question that permeates filmıand literature. Looking at thinkers as ancientıas Aristotle and novels as contemporary as TheıRazor's Edge, this class will discuss andıevaluate different conceptions of a good life andıprovide a place for students to engage in theirıown inquiry. In short, we will ask big questionsıand answer them through thinking, reading,ıdiscussing, and writing.
ı
INQS 125 16 From the Beats to the Beatles -ıThroughout the 1960s, as the lines between theıpersonal and the political became increasinglyıblurred, the lines between the nation's artistsıand activists began to blur as well. By the endıof the decade, writers like Allen Ginsberg,ıHunter S. Thompson, and Anne Sexton were asıfamous for their political activism and theirıpersonal escapades as they were for theirıwriting. Indeed, it is impossible to fullyıunderstand the decade's literature withoutıunderstanding its activism, and vice versa. Theıbest way of understanding the 1960s is to bearıthese paradoxes in mind: democracy andıseparatism; personal and political; art andıactivism. And this will be the basic method forıthis course: to write our way to understandingıhow social movements inform and are informed byıliterature, song, and oratory. 4 credits.
ı
INQS 125 18 Russian Writes and PoliticalıViolence - Explores how Russian writers haveırepresented political violence, with a focus onıthree forms of violence that have been recurrentıfeatures not only of Russian history, but of theıhistory of much of the world in the nineteenthıand twentieth centuries: the interface betweenıthe imperialist state and its colonial subjects,ıthe terrorist campaigns of revolutionaries, andımass murder on the part of the state.
ı
INQS 125 19 History of Mexican Immigration toıthe U.S. - An introduction to the nature of U.S.ıcultural, political, and eco-nomic relationshipsıwith Mexicans and Mexican Americans via anıexploration of Mexican immigration to the U.S.ıExamine both the historical context of thisıprocess, as well as contemporary issuesısurrounding the immigration debate. Explore theıhistorical importance of Mexican immigrants toıthe U.S. economic and political system, as wellıas the role Mexican immigrants have played in theıshaping of U.S. cultural identity. 4 credits.
ı
INQS 125 20 What is Good Citizenship - Whatıis a Good Citizen? Explores ideas about andıcommitments to citizenship. Is being a goodıcitizen more than the occasional paying of taxesıand casting of ballots? Has the concept ofıcitizenship changed over time? Are the duties,ıobligations and privileges of US citizenshipıpeculiar to its borders? Has technologyıundermined nationalism and dissolved borders?ıThis class will consider these questions and moreıas well as outline many forms of civicıen-gagement taking insights from philosophy,ıpolitical activism and history. Using literature,ıfilm, and classroom debate, students will beıchallenged to create their own criticalıassessments and agendas for wider communityıengagement. 4 credits.
ı
INQS 125 21 The American Experiment - TheıUnited States is an experiment that has lastedıover 230 years. As the citizens and innovators ofıthis experiment, Americans have attempted toırethink and reshape every aspect of humanıexperience. In this course, we will read some ofıthe most influential texts produced by ourırelatively young nation, in its ongoing effort toıdefine itself and its role in the larger world.ıWe will ask questions about our understandings ofınationality, citizenship, labor, leisure, nature,ıand the self, and we will examine some of the keyıconcepts and ideals that have thus far definedıAmerican national identity. 4 credits.

Back to Course List