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Chapter 3: Degree Programs & Requirements

1. The Choice of a Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science Degree

The Division of Continuing Education offers Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science degrees with majors in Accounting, Business Information Systems, International Business and Management. An online Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) is available to RNs with active licenses.

To earn a BA you must complete either one year (two semesters or three quarters) of elementary college level work in a single foreign language or five credits at a more advanced level. Students whose native language is not English are exempt from the foreign language requirement.

Candidates for the BS degree must successfully complete two courses of at least three credits each in a single department chosen from the following: anthropology, biology, chemistry, computer science, economics, environmental studies, mathematics, physics, political science, psychology, or sociology. These courses must be (a) outside the department which offers the major, and (b) beyond the Linfield Curriculum. If a student completes two majors, the BS degree requirement may be fulfilled by two courses from either major.

2. Requirements Common to all Bachelor’s Degrees

Linfield Entry Colloquium

Degree candidates are required to take the Linfield Entry Colloquium, IDST 008, within their first year of enrollment. This one-credit online class addresses the special needs of adults returning to college and provides an in-depth understanding of Linfield policy and degree requirements.

Number of Credits

To obtain a bachelor’s degree you need to complete a total of 125 semester credits of college work. At least 30 semester credits must come from Linfield classes. The remainder may be transferred from other schools. A maximum of 72 semester credits (108 quarter credits) may be transferred from community colleges. A student may earn a maximum of 31 semester hours in credit for prior learning and a maximum of 30 in non-course credits such as CLEP. Approximately one-third of the required credits represent the general education curriculum, one-third the major, and one-third general electives. 

Paracurricular Credit

Of the 125 semester hours required for graduation, no more than 8 may be in paracurricular credits, personal skill or creative activity courses usually valued at one credit. Physical Education courses are the most common type of paracurriculars. No more than four paracurricular courses from any one department may count toward graduation. The Entry Colloquium, IDST 008, is included in the 8 credit maximum. RN to BSN students complete an orientation in NURS 309, and are therefore not required to complete IDST 008.

Internship Credit

Linfield will accept up to 10 semester hours in cooperative work experience (CWE), supervised field experience (SFE) courses, or internships. No more than two internships, with no more than 5 credits from each, will count toward graduation. In order to receive CWE or SFE credit, you will need to provide descriptions of the responsibilities you assumed and the experience you gained during the course.

Residency Requirements

Twenty of the last 30 credits taken toward graduation must be from Linfield.

Grade Point Average (GPA)

To earn a BS or a BA degree from Linfield College a student must achieve a cumulative grade point average (GPA) of at least 2.00 in all Linfield coursework applying toward the degree and at least 2.00 in the courses used to satisfy major requirements. The BSN degree requires a 2.5 in major coursework.

Linfield Curriculum (General Education Requirements)

The purpose of the general education requirement called the Linfield Curriculum is to foster the development of wholly-educated persons by providing a coherent experience spanning the arts and humanities, natural sciences, and social-behavioral sciences. The Linfield Curriculum seeks to enable students to communicate effectively; appreciate literary, artistic, and historical works; be conversant with various philosophical and religious conceptions of humanity; understand the role of diversity both globally and nationally; analyze how human beings behave individually and socially; understand, formulate, and critique quantitative arguments; and comprehend the methods and accomplishments of modern science.

Grounded in the multidisciplinary spirit of the liberal arts, the Linfield Curriculum stresses wide exposure to the ways that educated individuals, be they scientists, artists, entrepreneurs, teachers, or ethicists, engage ideas, articulate choices, and assert opinions. It encourages students to cultivate intellectual and personal flexibility, pursue independent action, and engage in responsible decision-making. The Linfield Curriculum emphasizes communication and facilitates self-discovery in personal, cultural, and academic contexts. It affirms the need to understand people and societies both nationally and internationally. In short, the Linfield Curriculum encourages inquiry, analysis, and imagination, habits of mind that provide the foundation for reasoned action, wonder, and continued learning in all aspects of life.

The Linfield Curriculum consists of four major components:(1) the Inquiry Seminar; (2) Six Modes of Inquiry; (3) Diversity Studies; and (4) a Writing-Intensive Requirement. Courses contributing to the Linfield Curriculum are normally a minimum of 3 semester-credits. Any single class transferred from outside institutions must be at least 3 semester-credits or 4 quarter-credits. To encourage intellectual breadth, no student may count more than two courses from a single department toward completion of the Linfield Curriculum.

I. The Inquiry Seminar (INQS 126)

At the center of the Linfield Curriculum is the Inquiry Seminar, taken by each first-or second-year student. A collaborative investigation of a compelling subject, the Inquiry Seminar builds upon and deepens the relationship between thinking and communication, both oral and written. It models the goals of the entire Linfield Curriculum by developing the critical thinking skills common to every discipline and vital to becoming an educated person. Inquiry Seminars are taught by faculty from many fields and offer a wide range of topics varying from semester to semester. Because they provide an introduction to thinking and communicating within the academic environment, Inquiry Seminars do not satisfy requirements for majors and minors. Each student may take only one Inquiry Seminar except in cases of failure.

II. The Six Modes of Inquiry

The Modes of Inquiry offer six conceptual frames of reference central to the pursuit and construction of modern knowledge: Creative Studies; Individuals, Systems, and Societies; Natural World; Quantitative Reasoning; Ultimate Questions; and Vital Past. While resembling the traditional distributional arrangements of general education, these categories also transcend them by asking students and faculty to focus on the distinctive cross-disciplinary questions underlying each Mode of Inquiry. The Linfield Curriculum encourages intellectual breadth by introducing students to a wide variety of academic experiences.

Each student must complete at least seven approved courses, one in each of the Six Modes of Inquiry and one Upper-Division course. This Upper-Division course must be at the 300 level or above. It may be taken from any of the Modes of Inquiry, but it must be a course from outside the student’s major department. In the case of a student with multiple majors, the Upper Division course must be from outside one of the major departments. In other words, it may not be a course which satisfies the requirements of both majors. In the case of interdisciplinary majors, the Upper Division course must be from outside the student’s field of study.

To satisfy the requirement for each Mode of Inquiry and the Upper Division course, a student must demonstrate meeting the learning objectives of that mode by choosing an assignment, or collection of assignments, to post in an online repository. In the case of an experiential learning opportunity, the exemplar will be a summary report. The choice of these exemplars must be supported with a paragraph description. To receive credit for the Mode of Inquiry, these exemplars must be posted by the last day of finals of the semester the course is taken. For the case in which a course satisfies multiple LC designations, a student may initially choose to submit exemplars and support for multiple designations; however, the student must eventually select the designation for which the course is to count and submit exemplars and support from different courses for the other LC designations. Students can receive credit for only one LC designation per course.

A. Creative Studies (CS)

Courses with this designation are dedicated to the study of theory and practice in music, theatre, literature, and the visual and plastic arts. They foreground creative theory, or creative practice, or integrate the two. These courses study the making of art and how meaning – sometimes tense or contradictory – rises out of the interaction between artists, artworks, and audiences. Thus, they ask students to inquire into the ambiguities, contradictions and tensions fundamental to art-making and its aesthetic effects. Art is a primary way that human beings reflect upon their experiences and perceptions. Therefore, these courses encourage students to value lifelong engagement with the arts. Creative Studies courses are designated CS in each semester’s registration materials.

Learning Outcomes

In courses with CS designation, students will do the following:

  1. Explore the media, genre, craft and presentation of art.
  2. Investigate the complexity of defining and interpreting art.
  3. Examine the contexts and influences of art.
  4. Practice the improvisational and technical processes of art.

Courses with CS designation address the first learning outcome. In addition, they address at least one of the remaining three.

B. Individuals, Systems, and Societies (IS)

Courses in this area examine how members of societies organize themselves to satisfy individual and collective goals. They foster an understanding of the complexity and interconnectedness of individuals, systems, and societies across local, national, and/or global contexts. They also encourage students to think critically about themselves and their relationships to other individuals, institutions, and/or social systems. Individuals, Systems, and Societies courses are designated IS in each semester’s registration materials.

Learning Outcomes

Courses with IS designation are intended to provide students with opportunities to do the following:

  1. Understand individual, systemic, and/or social processes.
  2. Analyze individuals, systems, and/or societies through multiple frames of reference.
  3. Think critically about the ways that society affects individual behavior and/or individual behavior affects society.
  4. Articulate how key theoretical principles can be used to explain individual and social processes, inform public policy and/or develop practical approaches to human problems across local, regional, and/or global contexts.

Courses with IS designation address one or more of the above learning outcomes. Those courses meeting only one address the learning outcome in greater depth.

C. Natural World (NW)

Courses in this area explore science as a way of knowing about the natural world, highlighting the process of scientific inquiry and the interplay between theoretical and experimental analysis. They focus on fundamental principles that illuminate the study of our surroundings, including matter, energy, and living things. Emphasis is placed on students making connections between science and their daily lives. Natural World courses are designated NW in each semester’s registration materials.

Learning Outcomes

Courses with NW designation are intended to provide students with opportunities to learn the following:

  1. An understanding of the theoretical and/or experimental background of a particular topic or model, sufficient to form a hypothesis.
  2. An ability to critically analyze results of scientific inquiry in light of assumptions.
  3. An understanding of how scientific results can be extended to more general situations in contemporary society.

Courses with NW designation address all of the above learning outcomes.

D. Quantitative Reasoning (QR)

Courses in this category explore contextual problems involving quantitative relationships by means of numerical, symbolic, and visual representations. These courses foster critical analysis of the uses and constraints of quantitative information and its representations. Finally, they focus on discussing models; making appropriate assumptions; and deducing consequences or making predictions. Quantitative Reasoning courses are designated QR in each semester’s registration materials.

Learning Outcomes

Courses with QR designation are designed to develop the student’s ability to do the following:

  1. Frame contextual questions using mathematical representation.
  2. Apply models to deduce consequences or make predictions.
  3. Communicate quantitative arguments using clear prose.
  4. Critique quantitative arguments with respect to assumptions, constraints, and logical coherence.

Courses with QR designation address all of the above learning outcomes.

E. Ultimate Questions (UQ)

Courses with this designation are designed to encourage students to articulate and evaluate unexamined assumptions and paradigmatic ways of acquiring knowledge through a critical analysis of fundamental beliefs, cultural practices, and competing truth claims with the aim to develop greater self-knowledge and wisdom, the ability for meaningful dialogue, social responsibility and understanding, and an appreciation for questions that lead to deeper insights into our actions and the reasons for them. While this mode of inquiry strongly emphasizes an assessment of cognitive systems and symbols, such courses also explore metaphors and language that penetrate to pre-cognitive or post-cognitive levels of people’s action (ethics) and ways of belonging (sociology) often associated with the sacred. Ultimate Questions courses are designated UQ in each semester’s registration materials.

Learning Outcomes

In courses with UQ designation, students will learn and demonstrate growth from among the following:

  1. Articulating and evaluating unexamined assumptions and paradigmatic ways of acquiring knowledge.
  2. Analyzing critically fundamental beliefs, cultural practices, and competing truth claims.
  3. Developing greater self-knowledge and wisdom, the ability for meaningful dialogue, social responsibility and understanding.
  4. Appreciating questions that lead to deeper insights into our actions and the reasons for them.
  5. Exploring pre-cognitive and post-cognitive levels of people’s action (ethics) and ways of belonging (sociology) often associated with the sacred.

Recognizing that other modes of inquiry engage many of these issues, in an Ultimate Questions course, these topics and method lie at the center of the inquiry rather than arising as implications drawn from work in other modes of inquiry. All courses with UQ designation address the first learning outcome. In addition, they address at least one of the remaining four.

F. Vital Past (VP)

Courses in this mode of inquiry explore the human past and offer an opportunity to reflect on the continuities, change, and diversity in human experience across time. They investigate social, cultural, political, and other dimensions of human historical experience. They introduce students to various methods that scholars in different disciplines have developed to study the human past. These courses also encourage students to think critically about the interconnections between past and present. Vital Past courses are designated VP in each semester’s registration materials.

Learning Outcomes

Students who complete a course with VP designation should do the following:

  1. Identify, analyze, and contextualize primary sources.
  2. Identify and critique secondary, scholarly arguments about the past.
  3. Develop and defend an analytical or interpretive argument about the past.
  4. Recognize that differences separate people past and present, though all people share a common humanity.
  5. Evaluate the reliability of evidence about the past.

Courses with VP designation will fulfill many, but not necessarily all, of the learning outcomes.

III. Diversity Studies

An escalating interconnectedness marks the society into which Linfield students will graduate. Within our own national borders, heightened sensitivity to the diversity of perspectives, experiences, and aspirations that shape U.S. culture grounds the successful operations of democracy and facilitates the exercise of effective citizenship. The emergence of women into every phase of public life has also accelerated the pace of cultural change. These developments challenge all learners to seek new sources of knowledge and question established views on what constitutes knowledge.

Diversity Studies within the Linfield Curriculum is meant to ensure that all students examine the cultural and individual differences produced by such factors as gender, race, ethnicity, national origin, religion, and sexual orientation. The college thus affirms the benefits of mutual tolerance and civil discussion fostered by a deepened understanding of and respect for human complexity. Students must take two courses which address facets of cultural diversity such as gender, race, national or geopolitical allegiance, religion, sexual orientation, and cultural mores. One of the two required courses must address Global Pluralisms (GP), and one must explore U.S. Pluralisms (US). This requirement applies to all students regardless of citizenship. It is not met by classes in modern language instruction, though upper division culture classes offered by the Modern Languages Department may satisfy Global Pluralisms. Courses in Diversity Studies may, but are not mandated to, belong to any of the Modes of Inquiry. Students may propose experiential learning projects to satisfy half of this requirement; such projects must receive prior approval from the Curriculum Committee.

To satisfy the requirement for each diversity designation (GP, US), a student must demonstrate meeting the learning objectives of that designation by choosing an assignment, or collection of assignments, to post in an online repository. In the case of an experiential learning opportunity, the exemplar will be a summary report. The choice of these exemplars must be supported with a paragraph description. To receive credit for each diversity designation, these exemplars must be posted by the last day of finals of the semester the course is taken. For the case in which a course satisfies multiple designations, the student may submit exemplars and support for multiple designations; however, the student must eventually choose the designation for which the course is to count and will receive credit only for that single designation.

A. Global Pluralisms (GP)

Courses with this designation focus students’ attention beyond their own national boundaries. The use of analytical frameworks challenges students to address and understand the social, political, ethical, cultural, and/or policy discourses of other countries from a global perspective. These courses also include a consideration of multicultural perspectives within other countries. Curricular offerings focusing on the history or culture of a given nation, group, or region may meet this requirement by including a comparative component for the course. This focus may include comparisons between or among countries, as well as comparisons of different time periods. Through the process of examining Global Pluralisms, students prepare for their participation and citizenship in an increasingly diverse world. Global Pluralisms courses are designated GP in each semester’s registration materials. 

Learning Outcomes

In courses with GP designation, students will have opportunities to do the following:

  1. Develop a better understanding of the issues of identity, politics, culture, history, health care, and/or economics in a context of a culture other than that of the United States.
  2. Interrogate issues of colonialism, dominance, hegemony, and control by examining the social, economic, business, and/or political relationships that formerly colonized countries share with their imperial sites.
  3. Reflect upon the relationship that two or more countries share with each other through a comparative analysis of literature, the arts, politics, and/or social movements.
  4. Examine the impact of globalization and interdependence of cultures and economies on the lives of individuals.

Courses with GP designation address at least one of the above learning outcomes.

B. U.S. Pluralisms (US)

Courses with this designation explore the diverse experiences among those living in the United States. Students pursue inquiry into the varied dimensions of human diversity such as age, disability, ethnicity, gender, language, politics, race, religion, sexual orientation, and/or social class. These courses examine how the dominant traditions of American culture have marginalized the voices of those who have typically fallen outside those traditions, using analytical frameworks, or discussion that addresses the social, political, ethical, cultural, philosophical, and/or policy discourses among those groups. Through the process of examining U.S. Pluralisms, students prepare for their participation and citizenship in an increasingly diverse society. U.S. Pluralism courses are designated US in each semester’s registration materials. 

Learning Outcomes

In courses with US designation, students will have opportunities to do the following:

  1. Identify and articulate the context of pluralism within the United States, including but not limited to race, ethnicity, sex, gender, sexual orientation, identity, language, age, ability, religion, and/or social class.
  2. Analyze the historical, cultural, and/or aesthetic construction of marginality through a theoretical lens appropriate to the course content and discipline.
  3. Develop and defend an analytical or interpretive argument about social, cultural, political, and/or economic injustices, including but not limited to issues of power, social justice, privilege, and citizenship.

Courses with US designation address at least one of the above learning outcomes.

IV Writing-Intensive Requirements and Opportunities

In addition to the Inquiry Seminar, all students must complete the approved upper-division Writing-Intensive class, or sequence of classes, designated for their respective majors by their home departments. This requirement serves to enhance students’ mastery of the formats, conventions, and habits of mind appropriate to the major’s disciplinary investigations.

The Inquiry Seminar introduces students to the practices of inquiry, which form the foundation for the intellectual communities of the academy and the larger society. The Linfield Curriculum continues this process within various modes of inquiry. The overarching goal of Major Writing Intensive courses is to further develop the student’s ability to conduct inquiry within the various majors at the college—recognizing the importance of the writing process to the process of inquiry—and express the results of that inquiry in disciplinarily appropriate writing.

Therefore, courses designated as MWI pay explicit attention to writing and writing instruction while engaging students in all phases of the writing process. Furthermore, writing assignments are a significant portion of the course work and the course grade. In MWI courses:

  1. Students frame key questions important to the understanding of their discipline.
  2. Students answer such questions in writing appropriate to the conventions of their discipline and compelling to an intended audience.
  3. Students develop or further refine an iterative writing process that includes prewriting activities (e.g. discussion, research, literature review) drafting, revising and editing, and that is appropriate for their chosen discipline.
  4. Students receive significant instruction and feedback helping them in the various steps of this process.

Beyond these, the college extends students opportunities to perfect their writing skills in many courses offered across the curriculum, designated WI in departmental listings.

Learning Outcomes for the Linfield Curriculum Assessment Task Force (LCAT)

Students seeking to meet one of the Linfield Curriculum requirements (LC) with courses taken prior to or during their enrollment at Linfield must use the College’s online portfolio system, TaskStream, to submit an exemplar from the course and a brief description or rationale of how the submitted item exemplifies the LC being sought. Listed below are a series of questions and answers to assist in this process.

  1. What is an exemplar?” A model, a sample or example that demonstrates the student’s mastery of the learning outcomes for a course. This may be a paper, digital image of a work of art, or any other product required by the course.
  2. How do I post my exemplars to the e-portfolio or online repository?” You will be provided with access to the e-portfolio system called TaskStream. This system is an online database that provides students with the ability to create and maintain a digital portfolio.
  3. "For which classes do I post exemplars?" For courses taken at Linfield, the course must be designated as a course that fulfills the LC for which you
    are posting exemplars. If you are not sure the course fulfills an LC designation check the course syllabus, the Class Schedule, WebAdvisor, or the college course catalogue.
    For courses taken at other institutions, check with your advisor or the Associate Registrar.
  4. Where do I find the learning objectives for the particular mode of inquiry that I want to demonstrate?” The learning objectives for each mode of inquiry are available at the end of each LC description listed above, in the course sylabus for any Linfield course meeting an LC requirement, and in TaskStream.
  5. Is posting an exemplar in my e-portfolio required in order to earn the credits and the final grade in the course?” Your grade in the course is earned by meeting the learning objectives that the professor has established and is separate from posting an exemplar of your learning to your e-portfolio. However, while this process does not affect your grade for the course in any way, the course cannot be used to meet an LC for degree requirements unless an exemplar and rationale are posted by the end of the semester in which the course is taken.
  6. Am I required to post an example of a learning outcome for the courses that I transferred to Linfield to satisfy the Linfield Curriculum?” For those courses you completed at other institutions that you are using to satisfy a mode of inquiry in the Linfield Curriculum, you are expected to post an exemplar to your e-portfolio. You will be asked to upload a syllabus from the course as well as an exemplar. However, if it has been a long time since you completed the course, and you are unable to locate a syllabus or an exemplar, you may state this in the e-portfolio section where the exemplar is required.
    RN to BSN students are not required to post exemplars for courses completed prior to matriculation at Linfield, but must post them for Linfield Curriculum areas completed after beginning classes at Linfield.
  7. Is there a deadline for posting material to meet the LC requirement?” Yes, an exemplar and statement must be posted by the last day of finals of the semester the course is taken.
  8. Can I submit material for more than one LC?” Yes. However, the student must eventually choose which LC the course will meet.
  9. Will I have access to my e-portfolio after I graduate from Linfield, and for how long?” Yes, you may maintain your portfolio after graduation and can add other items to it over time to augment your resume.
  10. Who will evaluate my completion of the e-portfolio for each mode of inquiry in the Linfield Curriculum?” The Associate Registrar will verify that you have posted an exemplar and a description of the learning objective for each course in the Linfield Curriculum, prior to your graduation.

3. Accounting Major

Goals for the Major

In successfully completing a major in the department of business, students must:

  • Demonstrate literacy in accounting.
  • Apply knowledge of organizational strategy and the management of organizational behavior.
  • Demonstrate competency in financial analysis. • Develop an understanding of the role of marketing in organizations.
  • Show an appreciation of ethical, legal, and global aspects of business.

Requirements for the Major

  • To fulfill major requirements, a student must complete the courses listed below, from Linfield or in approved transfer. Fifteen credits of upper division  accounting must be from Linfield

    ECON 210 Principles of Economics
    BUSN 260 Financial Accounting
    BUSN 261 Managerial Accounting
    BUSN 301 Management
    BUSN 321 Marketing
    BUSN 340 Business Law I
    BUSN 341 Financial Management

    Upper Division Accounting Courses
    BUSN 361 Intermediate Accounting I
    BUSN 362 Intermediate Accounting II
    BUSN 495 Strategic Management (MWI)
  • and three courses selected from the following:
    BUSN 461 Cost Accounting
    BUSN 466 Advanced Accounting
    BUSN 468 Federal Income Tax
    BUSN 469 Auditing 
  • Financial Management and all accounting coursework except BUSN 260 and 261 must be upper division.
  • For students preparing to sit for the CPA exam in their state, BUSN 440 Business Law II and BUSN 464 Government/Not for Profit Accounting, and all four courses of BUSN 461, 466, 468, and 469 are recommended to be taken during the undergraduate degree. All prerequisites must be met prior to registration in recommended courses.
  • Contact your state board of accountancy for current information in your state:
    Oregon Board of Accountancy
    3218 Pringle Rd SE #110
    Salem OR 97302-6307
    503-378-4181 
    www.oregon.gov/BOA/

    Washington Board of Accountancy
    PO Box 9131
    Olympia WA 98507-9131
    360-753-2586 
    www.cpaboard.wa.gov
  • Find your state board of accountancy at the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants website (AICPA) http://www.aicpa.org/yellow/ypsboa.htm

Departmental Quantitative Requirements

Students enrolling in most business courses at or above BUSN 341 must:

  1. complete MATH 140 or equivalent; and 
  2. complete MATH 160 or above or the equivalent.

Departmental Policy on Prerequisites

The Department presumes that students will have taken the applicable prerequisite(s) when registering for courses. However, some courses have the option of “permission of instructor.” Prerequisites will be waived only if the Department Chair deems that a student’s background or other extenuating circumstances render the applicable prerequisite(s) unnecessary. This approval must be obtained prior to registration for class.

Meeting Course Requirements By Transfer Credits

Required courses such as Marketing, Management, and Business Law can be satisfied by approved transfer courses. In instances where the content of a course is not clear from its title, you may be asked to provide additional information in the form of catalog description or syllabus.

Age Limit on Coursework

Please note that you may not meet upper division accounting requirements with courses taken more than eight years prior to your application to Linfield. Additionally, Intermediate Accounting I, Intermediate Accounting II, Advanced Accounting and Federal Income Tax courses must have been taken no more than three years prior to your application to the program to be eligible for transfer.

4. Business Information Systems Major

Goals for the Major

In successfully completing a major in Business Information Systems, a student will be able to:

  • understand the basic concepts of financial and managerial accounting and micro- and macroeconomics.
  • analyze and evaluate the impact of environmental influences on marketing strategies in a competitive environment.
  • apply core management functions of decision-making, planning, organizing, leading and controlling to realistic organizational situations.
  • professionally communicate ideas, research and analysis in both oral and written formats.
  • understand the value and uses of information systems for business operation, management decision-making and strategic advantage.
  • work in teams for project development/completion and presentation.
  • demonstrate competency in at least one programming language.
  • be familiar with system analysis and design.
  • complete a comprehensive system development project.

Requirements for the Major

  • Students must complete the required BUSN, COMP, and ECON courses listed below.
  • Students must complete mathematics and statistics requirements
  • 12 semester credits must be completed in Computer Science courses from Linfield (the remainder may be equivalent transfer credits or credit for prior learning).
  • 9 semester credits in Business courses must be from Linfield (the remainder may be equivalent transfer credits or credit for prior learning).
  • Financial Management must be an upper division course.
    Computer Science required courses:
    COMP 101 Fundamentals of Information Systems and Technology
    COMP 152 Programming and Object Structures
    COMP 250 Database Program Development
    COMP 302 Software Engineering I (MWI)
    COMP 310 Networks and Web Application Development
    COMP 382 Management Information Systems
    COMP 400 Applied Software Development Project (MWI)
    COMP 404 Operations Management and
    COMP 484 Operations Research

    Economics and Business required courses:
    ECON 210 Principles of Economics
    BUSN 260 Financial Accounting
    BUSN 261 Managerial Accounting
    BUSN 301 Management
    BUSN 321 Marketing
    BUSN 341 Financial Management

Departmental Quantitative Requirements

Students enrolling in most business courses at or above BUSN 341 must:

  1. complete MATH 140 or equivalent; and
  2. complete MATH 160 or above or the equivalent.

Computer Science System Development Fee

BIS majors acquire over $8000 worth of industry-standard software for only $400 per year. This software is used for major courses and includes all updates and new releases as they become available throughout the year. The first time you register for any computer science course (except COMP 101 and COMP/BUSN 382), your student account will be charged $400. You will have the entire semester to pay this fee.

To meet the requirements for the software you will be using, your machine should have the following minimum requirements:

Processor: At least 1.6 GHz PC
Memory: Minimum of 2 GB
Disk Space: Minimum of 100GB free space. (Empty HD expected)

Departmental Policy on Prerequisites

The Department presumes that students will have taken the applicable prerequisite(s) when registering for courses. Prerequisites will be waived when the Department Chair deems that a student’s background or other extenuating circumstances render the applicable prerequisite(s) unnecessary. This approval must be obtained prior to registration for class.

Meeting Course Requirements by Transfer Credit

Appropriate transfer work will meet required coursework, but in some cases you may be asked to provide additional information. The transfer policy pertaining to the management core courses which is described in the section on the Management major also applies to the BIS major.

Age Limit on Coursework

Please note that you may not meet computer science requirements with courses taken more than eight years prior to application.

6. International Business Major

Goals for the Major

In successfully completing a major in the department of business, students must:

  • Demonstrate literacy in accounting.
  • Apply knowledge of organizational strategy and the management of organizational behavior.
  • Demonstrate competency in financial analysis.
  • Develop an understanding of the role of marketing in organizations.
  • Show an appreciation of ethical, legal, and global aspects of business.

Requirements for the Major

  • 15 semester credits of upper division coursework at or above the level of BUSN 341 Financial Management must be from Linfield.
  • Language: Foreign language proficiency through the firstyear level (American Sign Language proficiency does not apply).
  • At least one upper-division course focused on history, culture, politics or religion relevant to the modern era in a country or region outside the U.S.: HIST 314, 315, 320, 322, 346, 360, 361, 362, 364, 400, 463; POLS 362, 370, 372, 385, 390; RELS/HIST 310; RELS 380, 383; or other course taken domestically or abroad when approved in advance by the IB coordinator.
  • Study Abroad: Successful completion of a study abroad experience of at least one semester in length approved in advance by the IB coordinator, preceded by either one semester of foreign language at the intermediate level (or higher) or TCCA 230, Intercultural Communication. The Business Department will work with students to arrange for a self-designed experience or course through another accredited institution.
  • Completion of the following required courses:
    ECON 210 Principles of Economics
    BUSN 260 Financial Accounting
    BUSN 261 Managerial Accounting
    BUSN 301 Management
    BUSN 321 Marketing
    BUSN 340 Business Law
    BUSN 341 Financial Management
    BUSN 495 Strategic Management (MWI)
  • Three of the five listed below are also required:
    BUSN 410 International Management
    BUSN 426 International Marketing
    BUSN 435 International Business Law
    BUSN 443 International Finance
    BUSN 480 Independent Study
    BUSN 487 Internship
    ECON 331 International Economics OR
    ECON 333 International Monetary Economics

Note: The location and topic for BUSN 487 must be approved in advance for IB major credit. Only one of the two ECON courses may count toward this requirement.

Study Abroad:

Students must successfully complete a study period abroad which has been approved in advance for this purpose to provide them with substantial exposure to foreign culture, life styles and business practices. Travel abroad will not be sufficient. An international course meeting this requirement will generally be scheduled for alternate summers. Economic History of the Industrial Revolution and Human Ecosystems in Ecuador are recent international courses. You are expected to fulfill this requirement while you work toward your degree. Prior experience is not acceptable.

If you plan to fulfill this requirement by travelling on your own, you need to submit a proposal to the Chair of the Business Department well in advance of your anticipated trip. Plan a minimum of 14 days foreign study, a longer stay is strongly encouraged. An established program with an accredited college covering business, culture, and where appropriate, language is preferred.

If you arrange a trip on your own, the proposal must include: detailed itinerary, literature analysis, list of study objectives and how they will be achieved, detailed list of topics to be covered, list of major references to be used, list of contacts for interviews and company visits. At the end of the independent study, a paper will be submitted which integrates the academic literature on the topic with the interviews.

Departmental Quantitative Requirements

Students enrolling in most business courses at or above BUSN 341 must:

  1. complete MATH 140 or equivalent; and
  2. complete MATH 160 or above or the equivalent.

Departmental Policy on Prerequisites

The Department presumes that students will have taken the applicable prerequisite(s) when registering for courses. Prerequisites will be waived when the Department Chair deems that a student’s background or other extenuating circumstances render the applicable prerequisite(s) unnecessary. This approval must be obtained prior to registration for class.

Meeting Course Requirements By Transfer Credits

Required courses such as Marketing, Management and Business Law can be satisfied by approved transfer courses. In instances where the content of a course is not clear from its title, you may be asked to provide additional information in the form of catalog description or syllabus.

Age Limit on Coursework

Courses used to meet the International Business language proficiency must be within five years.

7. Management Major

Goals for the Major

In successfully completing a major in the department of business, students must:

  • Demonstrate literacy in accounting.
  • Apply knowledge of organizational strategy and the management of organizational behavior.
  • Demonstrate competency in financial analysis.
  • Develop an understanding of the role of marketing in organizations.
  • Show an appreciation of ethical, legal, and global aspects of business.

Requirements for the Major

  • Completion of the following required courses:
    ECON 210 Principles of Economics
    BUSN 260 Financial Accounting
    BUSN 261 Managerial Accounting
    BUSN 301 Management
    BUSN 321 Marketing
    BUSN 340 Business Law
    BUSN 341 Financial Management
    BUSN 405 Human Resource Management
    BUSN 495 Strategic Management (MWI)
  • Completion of at least 2 Linfield Management electives above BUSN 341. These courses must be taken through Linfield.
  • Completion of Mathematics and Statistics requirements.
    Linfield Management Electives
    BUSN 407 Organizational Behavior
    BUSN 410 International Management
    BUSN 415 Business, Ethics & Society
    BUSN 423 Entrepreneurship
    BUSN 436* Topics in Management
    BUSN 480** Independent Study
    BUSN 487** Internship
    *may be repeated with different content
    **with instructor approval

Departmental Quantitative Requirements

Students enrolling in most business courses at or above BUSN 341 must:

  1. complete MATH 140 or equivalent; and
  2. complete MATH 160 or above or the equivalent.

Departmental Policy on Prerequisites

The Department presumes that students will have taken the applicable prerequisite(s) when registering for courses. Prerequisites may be waived when the Department Chair deems that a student’s background or other extenuating circumstances render the applicable prerequisite(s) unnecessary. This approval must be obtained prior to registration for class.

Meeting Management Course Requirements by Transfer Credits

Required courses such as Marketing, Management, Business Law can be satisfied by approved transfer courses. In instances where content of a course is not clear from its title, you may be asked to provide additional information in the form of a catalog description or syllabus.

7. Marketing Major

Goals for the Major

In successfully completing a major in the department of business, students must:

  • Demonstrate literacy in accounting.
  • Apply knowledge of organizational strategy and the management of organizational behavior.
  • Demonstrate competency in financial analysis.
  • Develop an understanding of the role of marketing in organizations.
  • Show an appreciation of ethical, legal, and global aspects of business.

Requirements for the Major

  • Completion of the following required courses:
    ECON 210 Principles of Economics
    BUSN 260 Financial Accounting
    BUSN 261 Managerial Accounting
    BUSN 301 Management
    BUSN 321 Marketing
    BUSN 340 Business Law
    BUSN 341 Financial Management
    BUSN 495 Strategic Management (MWI)
  • Completion of at least 3 Linfield Marketing electives above BUSN 341. These courses must be taken through Linfield.
  • Linfield Marketing Electives
    BUSN 420 Sales and Sales Management
    BUSN 421 Promotions Management
    BUSN 426 International Marketing
    BUSN 427* Topics in Marketing
    BUSN 435 International Business Law
    BUSN 480** Independent Study
    BUSN 487** Internship
    *may be repeated with different content
    **if the topic/internship is closely related to marketing as determined by the supervising instructor

Departmental Quantitative Requirements

Students enrolling in most business courses at or above BUSN 341 must:

  1. complete MATH 140 or equivalent; and
  2. complete MATH 160 or above or the equivalent.

Departmental Policy on Prerequisites

The Department presumes that students will have taken the applicable prerequisite(s) when registering for courses. Prerequisites may be waived when the Department Chair deems that a student’s background or other extenuating circumstances render the applicable prerequisite(s) unnecessary. This approval must be obtained prior to registration for class.

Meeting Management Course Requirements by Transfer Credits

Required courses such as Marketing, Management, Business Law can be satisfied by approved transfer courses. In instances where content of a course is not clear from its title, you may be asked to provide additional information in the form of a catalog description or syllabus. 

8. Nursing Major (RN to BSN)

The RN to BSN program is designed for Registered Nurses seeking a BSN degree. Prospective students apply for admission to Linfield and may complete prerequisites through the Adult Degree Program or in approved transfer courses.

Goals for the Major

  • Build a professional practice informed by the mission of Linfield College and the vision, mission and philosophy of the School of Nursing as well as the standards and values of the nursing profession.
  • Apply sound clinical reasoning, reflective practice and evidence-based practice in the provision of holistic nursing care.
  • Communicate effectively and collaboratively in professional practice.
  • Use a range of information and clinical technologies to achieve health care outcomes for clients.
  • Provide effective nursing care that incorporates diverse values, cultures, perspectives and health practices.
  • Engage in ethical reasoning and actions that demonstrate caring and commitment to social justice in the delivery of health care to clients in the community.
  • Apply principles of stewardship and leadership skills to support quality and safety within complex organizational systems.
  • Integrate knowledge of health care policy, populations, finance and regulatory environments that influence system level change within professional nursing practice.
  • Incorporate a liberal arts based understanding of local and global health care issues to health promotion, risk reduction, disease and illness prevention and disease and health care management.

Admission to the RN to BSN Program

  1. Prospective students should contact the Division of Continuing Education (DCE) and discuss program prerequisites with an academic advisor. Prospective students apply for admission to the college while completing prerequisite courses.
  2. Apply for admission to the RN to BSN program through DCE as a Pre RN to BSN student or a RN to BSN major.
  3. After completion of the nursing prerequisites and the majority of the Linfield Curriculum (LC) courses, students are admitted to the RN to BSN Program major. Prior to that, students are admitted as Pre RN to BSN majors.
  4. Complete all nursing prerequisites with a grade above C-.
  5. Official transcripts from all universities attended.
  6. A completed student recommendation form from a current supervisor or faculty.
  7. A current unencumbered registered nurse license in which the nurse currently practices and where clincials will be completed is required.
  8. A 2.75 GPA in nursing prerequisites is required.

All nursing prerequisites or equivalents are required to be completed prior to enrolling in NURS 309: Transition to Professional Nursing.

  • College-level writing courses (minimum 4 semester credits)
  • Anatomy with lab
  • Physiology with lab
  • Microbiology with lab
  • Lifespan Developmental Psychology
  • Statistics • Nutrition
  • Computer Competency (Proficiency Waiver Available)

Students should have the majority of the LC courses completed prior to enrollment in NURS 309. Your academic advisor will assist you in developing a plan of study that leads to your success in the nursing curriculum.

After admission to the Nursing major, and before registering for NURS 309, students must:

  1. Provide proof of current unencumbered registered nurse license in the state where clinical experiences will occur.
  2. Provide verification of criminal background checks prior to the program start date (refer to LGSSON Student Manual)
  3. Submit signed Essential Functions document.
  4. Provide verification of personal health insurance.
  5. Purchase annual nursing liability insurance through the college. RN to BSN students are protected under the Linfield College liability insurance, when carrying out clinical/community responsibilities during nursing courses. A $60 fee is charged annually with your registration (beginning with NURS 309).
  6. Indicate consent or withholding of consent of use of student papers.

A non-refundable deposit of $200 is required to secure a spot in NURS 309. The deposit is applied to your Linfield College student account. Should NURS 309 reach capacity prior to the schedule deadline, you will have the option to be wait listed, with your deposit, as well as transfer onto the next priority list for the following semester. The deadline deposit schedule is as follows:

Fall cohort: due in DCE office by July 1

Spring cohort: due in DCE office by December 1

Summer cohort: due in DCE office by April 1

Should you not submit the $200 non-refundable deposit, your registration will be processed on a rolling basis and determined by the date of your registration until the course limit is reached. Additionally, admission to NURS 309 is contingent and prioritized based upon successful completion of the School of Nursing prerequisites and LC courses. Priority is given to Pre RN to BSN students who have completed all of the prerequisites and LC courses thus transitioning into NURS 309 as an RN to BSN major. Please contact your academic advisor should you require additional information related to this process.

Progression in the BSN Program

Students must maintain a minimum BSN grade point average of 2.5, and grades in all Nursing major courses must be above a C-. Successfully complete NURS 309 (grade above C-). Upon completion, 32 semester credits of Linfield nursing coursework will be awarded as credit for prior learning. There is an evaluation fee of $525 for the Credit for Prior Learning award. You will receive a billing statement when the credits have been added to your transcript, and will have the entire next semester to pay the fee.

In addition to the College’s graduation requirements, students must complete nursing courses in the following sequence:

NURS 309 Transition to Professional Nursing Practice
NURS 315 Professional Communication in Diverse Communities
NURS 320 Scholarship of Nursing
NURS 460 Population-based Nursing in a Multicultural and Global Society
NURS 470 Leading and Managing in Nursing
NURS 475 Integrated Experiential Learning IV

The final course, NURS 475, requires experiential activities in the student’s health care community with a nurse leader. Please verify with your academic advisor the feasibility of a clinical placement in your community (if outside of the state of Oregon) in order to ensure that your clinical placement/course progression is not delayed. If you relocate to another state after your admission to the nursing program, please contact your academic advisor immediately to determine the feasibility of completing NURS 475 in your new location. International clinical opportunities are available in NURS 475.

Before registering for NURS 475, students must submit:

  1. A health information form completed by a health care provider including proof of appropriate immunizations. (Requirements subject to change.)
  2. Proof of current chest X-ray or TB screening test.
  3. Current CPR certification – American Heart Association Basic Life Support for Healthcare Providers or American Red Cross First Aid/CPR/AED for Professional Rescuers.
  4. Completion of StudentMax learning modules and clinical site specific requirements.

Completion of program requirements:

  • Complete a minimum of 30 semester credits at Linfield College (35 credits if student has completed a previous bachelor’s degree) to fulfill the residency requirement.
  • Complete all LC course requirements.
  • Successfully complete NURS 309, 315, 320, 460, 470, and 475 (grades above C-).
  • Accrue a minimum of 125 semester credits required for graduation.

School of Nursing Policies

Due to the nature of nursing practice and education, additional school of nursing policies can be found in the Student Nursing Handbook, linfield.edu/portland/assets/files/nursing/student-handbook.html.

 

9. Environmental Studies Minor and other Minors

Environmental Studies:

Environmental Studies presents different perspectives on the relationships between humans and the planet’s life-support system. It seeks to develop in students a deep awareness of the complex, highly dynamic nature of the world we inhabit, including interactions among population, the biological and physical environments, resources, technology, social organization and culture. The portion of the planet we occupy in the Pacific Northwest is exceptionally diverse for its latitude and affords rich opportunities for study and participation..

Students may elect this minor as a means of adding an environmental perspective to their major field of study. Because our whole being and our very survival as a species are so intimately connected with a healthy biosphere, Environmental Studies is highly interdisciplinary with almost every field in the liberal arts curriculum involved. While the field traditionally draws most heavily from the natural and social sciences, studies in the humanities are also important for developing skills in communication and interpretation.

Requirements for the Major

24-30 credits distributed as follows:
ENVS 201 Environmental Science and
ENVS 203 Human Adaptive Strategies or 250 Environmental Sociology
ENVS 040 Community Service (requires preapproval) or ENVS 090 Environmental Issues Forum
ENVS 485 Environmental Problem-Solving Seminar

four courses (12-20 credits) from among those courses counting toward the major; one of the four courses must be a natural science field course (380, ANTH/BIOL 290, BIOL 240, 260, 285, 350 or 385); one must be a social science course from among ANTH 203, ECON 341, 342; POLS 335, or SOCL 250; and at least one must be at the 300 level or above. 480, 487 or 490 may be counted as an elective within the minor. (At least one of these four courses must be from outside the department of the student’s major)

Environmental Studies courses offered through the Adult Degree Program

ANTH/BIOL 105 Human Biology & Evolution
ANTH 111 Cultural Anthropology
BIOL 201 Concepts in Marine Ecology
BIOL 204 Intro to Ecology
ENGL 304 Environmental Literature
ENVS 302 Shoreline Ecology (Field-Based)
ENVS 303 Human Ecosystems (Field-Based)
ENVS 305 Environmental Issues and the Physical Sciences
ENVS 306 Fire History of the Cascades (Field-Based)
ENVS 308 Water Resources
HIST 252 History of U.S. West
HIST 257 The Pacific Northwest
PHIL 306 Environmental Ethics
PHYS 107 Energy and the Environment
SOCL 101 Fundamentals of Sociology
SOAN 365 Urban Society & Culture

Other Minors:

Many Linfield departments, though not all, offer minors. The requirements are listed in the college catalog, which you may consult in your advisor’s office. In general, courses required for minors are not available through the Adult Degree Program. The Certificates in Human Resource Management, Marketing, and Computer Information Systems may be completed concurrently by a student who is also enrolled in a BS, BA, or BSN degree at Linfield College.

12. Certificate Program

Linfield College’s certificate program is designed for adult students who desire to acquire skills and knowledge in specialized employment areas. The Accounting Certificate is only open to students who have earned a bachelor’s degree and completed financial and managerial accounting courses.

Requirements include completing from 4 to 6 courses as outlined in each certificate. No more than one of the required courses may be met by transfer work. Only one course may be used to meet both major and certificate requirements. No prerequisites are required for business courses taken solely for the certificate. Courses required for the certificate, however, must be taken in sequence. If a student does not have the prerequisites for business courses taken toward the certificate these courses cannot be used to meet degree requirements in the major.

Certificate in Accounting (Post Baccalaureate)

http://www.linfield.edu/dce/accounting-certificate.html

Requires completion of:

BUSN 361, 2 Intermediate Accounting I, II
BUSN 461 Cost Accounting
BUSN 466 Advanced Accounting
BUSN 468 Federal Income Tax
BUSN 469 Auditing

Certificate in Computer Information Systems

http://www.linfield.edu/dce/computer-systems-certificate.html

Requires completion of:

COMP 101 Fundamentals of Info Systems and Technology
COMP 152 Programming and Object Structures

Software Engineering Track
COMP 302 Software Engineering I/5
COMP 310 Networks & Web Application Development
COMP 400 Applied Software Development Project

Database Administration Track
COMP 250 Database Program Development
COMP 450 Advanced Database Concepts

Web Application Development Track
COMP 302 Software Engineering I
- or -
COMP 250 Database Program Development
Plus
COMP 310 Network & Web Application Development
COMP 400 A pplied Software Development Project

Certificate in Human Resource Management

http://www.linfield.edu/dce/human-resources-certificate.html

Requires completion of:

BUSN 301 Management
BUSN 405 Human Resource Management

Plus two of the following:

BUSN 380 Industrial Organizational Psychology
BUSN 407 Organizational Behavior
BUSN 436 Topics (Depending on topic)

Certificate in Marketing

http://www.linfield.edu/dce/marketing-certificate.html

Requires completion of:

BUSN 321 Marketing

Plus three of the following:

BUSN 420 Sales and Sales Management
BUSN 421 Promotions Management
BUSN 426 International Marketing
BUSN 427 Topics in Marketing