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Appendices

Appendix A. Linfield Courses Recently Offered in DCE that Satisfy the Linfield Curriculum

Inquiry Seminar (INQS)

INQS 126 Inquiry Seminar

Creative Studies (CS)

AAVC 110 Intro to Visual Culture
AAVC 120 Drawing
AAVC 260 Painting
AAVC 382 Creative Development Studio
ENGL 200 Intro to Creative Writing
ENGL 250 Literature of Experience
ENGL 270 Western American Literature
ENGL 301 Topics in Literature
ENGL 304 Environmental Literature
ENGL 305 Diverse Voices in Literary Expression
ENGL 380 Ultimate Questions in Literature
MLCH 211 Intro to East Asian Culture
MUSC 135 Understanding Jazz
MUSC 137 American Popular Music

Individuals, Systems & Societies (IS)

AAVC 110 Intro to Visual Culture
ANTH 111 Cultural Anthropology
ANTH 332 Medical Anthropology
ECON 210 Principles of Economics
ECON 341 Environmental Economics
ECON 342 Natural Resource Economics
ENVS 203 Human Adaptive Strategies
ENVS 303 Human Ecosystems
HHPA 242 Human Sexuality
PSYC 101 Survey of Psychology
POLS 210 International Politics
POLS 315 International Politics 
POLS 372 Islamist Movements
POLS 384 US Foreign Policy
POLS 386 Topics Comparative Politics
PSYC 155 Lifespan Development Psychology
PSYC 367 Psychology East & West
SOAN 205 Gender and Society
SOAN 232 Medicine & Culture
SOAN 240 Utopias and Dystopias
SOAN 265 Race and Ethnicity
SOAN 270 Latinas & Latinos in US
SOAN 360 Sociology of Culture
SOAN 365 Urban Society & Culture
SOCL 101 Fundamentals of Sociology
SOCL 201 Deviance: Individual & Society
TCAA 230 International Communication: Global Perspective

Ultimate Question (UQ)

ENGL 304 Environmental Literature
ENGL 380 Ultimate Questions in Lit
HSCI 360 Science: A Candle in the Dark 
IDST 320 History of Western Thought I
IDST 321 History of Western Thought II
NURS 358 HIV Nursing: Caring & Concepts
NURS 362 Palliative Care Nursing 
PHIL 150 Fundamentals of Philosophy
PHIL 160 Philosophy East and West
PHIL 215 Bioethics
PHIL 245 Aesthetics
PHIL 306 Environmental Ethics
PHIL 350 Modern Philosophy 
PHIL 365 Social & Political Philosophy
PSYC 262 Perspectives on Gender
PSYC 367 Psychology East & West
RELS 120 Old Testament
RELS 130 New Testament
RELS 140 The Holy Qur’an
RELS 330 History of Religion in America
RELS 360 Dead Sea Scrolls
SOAN 240 Utopias and Dystopias

Natural World (NW)

ANTH 105 Human Biology & Evolution
BIOL 201 Concepts in Marine Ecology
BIOL 204 Introduction to Ecology
ENVS 201 Environmental Science
ENVS 302 Shoreline Ecology
ENVS 303 Human Ecosystems
ENVS 305 Environmental Issues and the Physical Sciences
ENVS 306 Fire History of the Cascades
ENVS 308 Water Resources
HHPA 280 Nutrition
PSYC 101 Survey of Psychology

Quantitative Reasoning (QR)

ECON 210 Economics
ECON 341 Environmental Economics
ECON 342 Natural Resource Economics
MATH 110 Great Ideas in Mathematics
MATH 140 Statistics
NURS 320 Scholarship of Nursing
PHYS 107 Energy & the Environment

Vital Past (VP)

ANTH 112 Archaeology and World Prehistory
ENGL 270 Western American Literature
HIST 122 History of World Civilization I
HIST 150 Survey of US History
HIST 200 Modern China
HIST 210 Modern Japan
HIST 252 History of the US West
HIST 257 The Pacific Northwest
HIST 300 Topics in Asian History*
HIST 302 Topics in European History
HIST 304* Topics in Latin American History
HIST 316 History of Mexico
HIIST 346 Europe and the West Since 1939
HIST 371 Race and Minority Cultures in U.S.
HIST 376 History of Soviet Russia
HIST 390 Slavery in the Americas
IDST 320 History of Western Thought I
IDST 321 History of Western Thought II
POLS 384 US Foreign Policy
POLS 120 Old Testament
RELS 130 New Testament
RELS 140 The Holy Qur’an
RELS 330 History of Religion in America
RELS 360 Dead Sea Scrolls

U.S. Pluralisms (US)

ENGL 270 Western American Literature
HHPA 100 Drug Use in US
HIST 252 History of US West
HIST 371 Race & Minority Cultures in U.S.
MUSC 135 Understanding Jazz
MUSC 137 American Popular Music
PSYC 262 Perspectives on Gender
RELS 330 History of Religion in America
SOAN 205 Gender & Society
SOAN 265 Race & Ethnicity
SOAN 270 Latinas & Latinos in US
SOAN 360 Sociology of Culture
SOCL 101 Fundamentals of Sociology
SOCL 201 Deviance: Individual and Society

Global Pluralisms (GP)

ANTH 111 Cultural Anthropology
ANTH 332 Medical Anthropology
BUSN 410 International Management
BUSN 426 International Marketing
ENGL 305 Diverse Voices in Literary Expression
ENVS 203 Human Adaptive Strategies
HIST 122 History of World Civilization I
HIST 125 East Asia since 1800
HIST 200 Modern China
HIST 210 Modern Japan
HIST 300* Topics in Asian History
HIST 302* Topics in European History
HIST 304* Topics in Latin American History
HIST 316 History of Mexico
HIST 346 Europe and the West Since 1939
HIST 371 Race and Minority Cultures in U.S.
HIST 376 History of Soviet Russia
IDST 320 History of Western Thought I
IDST 321 History of Western Thought II
MLCH 211 Intro to East Asian Culture
PHIL 160 Philosophy East and West
POLS 210 International Politics
POLS 372 Islamist Movements
POLS 386 Topics Comparative Politics
PSYC 367 Psychology East and West
RELS 140 Holy Qur’an
SOAN 232 Medicine & Culture
TCAA 230 Intercultural Communication: Global Perspective

Major Writing Intensive (MWI)

BUSN 495 Strategic Management
COMP 302 Software Engineering
HIST 490 Research
IDST 490 Arst & Humanities Research Project
NURS 470 Leading and Managing in Nursing

*May be repeated with different topic

Upper Division outside of Major Group

The upper division course must be must be designated in one of the Six Modes of Inquiry; CS, IS, NW, QR, UQ, VP, and outside of the student’s major department, and for multi-disciplinary majors, outside of the student’s primary field of study. Any of the courses that are listed as satisfying the Linfield Curriculum and are numbered 300 or above may meet the upper division requirement.

Appendix B. Course Descriptions

 US  U.S. Pluralisms  IS  Individuals, Systems, & Societies NW  Natural World
 GP  Global Pluralisms  INQS  Inquiry Seminar  UQ  Ultimate Questions
 CS  Creative Studies  MWI  Major Writing Intensive  VP  Vital Past
         QR  Quantative Reasoning

Anthropology See Sociology/Anthropology section

Art and Visual Culture

AAVC 110 Introduction to Visual Culture Introduction survey examining critical approaches to interpreting imagery in diverse cultural contexts throughout history. Intended to develop an awareness of the power of visual materials, such as propaganda and advertising, within the socio-cultural, political, philosophical and economic forces that encode imagery with meaning. 4 credits (CS, IS)

AAVC 120 Drawing I Fundamentals of gesture, value, contour, and perspective drawing in various media. Expressive, critical and thematic development. $50 lab fee. 4 credits (CS)

AAVC 260 Painting I Painting techniques and studio practices in oil or aqueous media attending to distinct approaches and modalities. Thematic and critical development. Prerequisite: 120 or consent of instructor. 4 credits. (CS)

AAVC 382 Creative Development Studio Develop art or craft form through mentored work, critical thinking. Intended for DCE online students. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 4 credits (CS)

Biology

BIOL/ANTH 105 Human Biology and Evolution Principles of human biology and evolution, dealing with the genetics, physiology, and behavior of humans and other primates. Study of the relationships between biology and culture. Emphasis on the theory of evolution , its application to humans, and recent discoveries in the field of human prehistory. Lecture, readings, films, essays, and discussion. 3 credits. (NW)

BIOL 201 Concepts in Marine Ecology Physical, chemical, and biological factors in the marine environment, examination of organism types and adaptations, major offshore and coastal ecosystems, and consideration of human impacts. Offered spring of odd-numbered years. 3 credits (NW)

BIOL 204 Intro to Ecology An introduction to the basic principles of general ecology. Aspects of organismal, ecosystem, population and community ecology will be covered. Emphasis on terrestrial ecosystems. Lecture and required field trip. Prerequisite: MATH 105 or consent of instructor. 3 credits (NW)

Business

BUSN 260 Financial Accounting Basic concepts and methods of financial reporting, including basic financial statements, accounting cycle, asset valuation, income determination and essential accounting records. Prerequisite: MATH 105. 4 credits.

BUSN 261 Managerial Accounting Basic concepts and methods of managerial accounting including partnerships and corporations, manufacturing accounting, cost accounting, budgeting and responsibility accounting. Prerequisite: MATH 105, BUSN 260. 4 credits.

BUSN 301 Management The key decision-making role of managers in modern organizations. Includes the study of organizations, management styles, and selected administrative problems. Prerequisite: sophomore standing or higher. 4 credits.

BUSN 321 Principles of Marketing The elements of marketing emphasizing the managerial considerations in planning market strategies. Target markets, buyer behavior, product parameters, price promotion, and distribution. Prerequisite: MATH 105, BUSN 261, ECON 210. 4 credits.

BUSN 301 Management 

BUSN 340 Business Law I The legal environment of business, torts and crimes, contracts and e-contracts, and property law. An introduction to business entities. Prerequisite: MATH 105 or equivalent; 260; ECON 210; completion of 30 credit hours at time of registration and 45 credit hours by the start of class. 4 credits.

BUSN 341 Financial Management Financial management analytical techniques for financial decision-making. Formulation of financial objectives and policies; financial analysis, planning and control; asset management; securities valuation; capital budgeting; and capital structure strategies. Prerequisites: 261; ECON 210; MATH 140,160. 4 credits.

Note: To enroll in most BUSN courses numbered 341 and above, a student must have completed Finite Math with Calculus and Intro to Statistics.

BUSN 361 Intermediate Accounting I Accounting principles, conventions and rules as reflected in the pronouncements of leading professional and accounting research organizations. Valuation of current and fixed assets, and the impact of valuation procedures on income determination. Prerequisite: BUSN 261; MATH 140, 160. 4 credits.

BUSN 362 Intermediate Accounting II Continuation of 361. Liabilities, shareholders’ equity, dilutive securities, and investments. Issues related to income determination and the preparation and analysis of financial statements. Prerequisite: 361. 4 credits.

BUSN 380 Industrial Organizational Psychology Role of psychological principles in personnel selection, testing, human engineering, employer/ employee relations, production, efficiency, training and safety. Prerequisite: BUSN 301 or PSYC 101 or 188. 3 credits.

BUSN 405 Human Resource Management Techniques for administering the personnel function. Organizing, staffing, recruiting and placement, performance appraisal, training and development, wage and benefit administration, labor relations, and auditing manpower requirements. Prerequisite: BUSN 301, 340; MATH 140. 4 credits.

BUSN 407 Organizational Behavior The individual in the organization. Participation, leadership, motivation, communication, decision-making, team development, conflict resolution, and adaptation to change. Prerequisite: BUSN 301; MATH 140. 4 credits.

BUSN 410 International Management Examination of cross-cultural issues in the management of the multinational firm. Sociocultural context, broad environmental issues, legal and political aspects, operational and strategic considerations and social responsibility and ethical issues. Prerequisite: BUSN 301. 4 credits. (GP)

BUSN 415 Business, Ethics & Society Ethical concepts relevant to resolving moral issues in business. Analytic skills for applying ethical concepts to business decisions. Moral issues in management related to social and environmental issues. Prerequisite: BUSN 301, BUSN 340. 4 credits.

BUSN 420 Sales & Sales Management Introductory study in sales management, exploring the variables of sales motivation and performance to specify their interrelationships. Prerequisite: BUSN 321; MATH 160, 140. 4 credits.

BUSN 421 Advertising Management Examines all the tools within the promotional mix — advertising, public relations, sales promotion, direct marketing, internet and sales channels. Analysis of the pros/cons of each and how the creation and execution of consistent brand development throughout the promotional mix is key to building and maintaining brand equity. Prerequisites: BUSN 321, MATH 140, 160. 4 credits.

BUSN 423 Entrepreneurship Understanding the skills and motivation required for entrepreneurial success. Examination of start-up requirements; organization structure; legal, financial and human resources considerations. Emphasis on formulation of an effective business plan in a small business environment. Prerequisite: BUSN 301, 321, MATH 140. 4 credits.

BUSN 426 International Marketing International marketing for multinational enterprise; economic, political and cultural environments; international marketing research, product adaptation, pricing strategies, communications and distribution channels; international logistics, promotion, organization and control, marketing services and countertrade. Prerequisite: BUSN 321, MATH 140, 160. 4 credits. (GP)

BUSN 427 Topics in Marketing Selected topics in marketing using small group discussions. Student participation. Open to juniors and seniors pursuing a major or minor in business. May be repeated with consent of instructor when the marketing topic is essentially different. Prerequisite: 321. 4 credits

BUSN 435 International Business Law Fundamental concepts, principles, and rules of law that apply to international transactions. The study of contracts, financial instruments, and trade laws including GATT and European Union, criminal law, and laws relating to transportation of cargo by sea and air, intellectual, property law, political risk and international environmental issues. 4 credits.

BUSN 436 Topics in Management Selected topics in management designed to provide a more detailed examination of a specific facet of management studies. Course uses small group discussion and intensive class participation. Open to juniors and seniors pursuing a major or minor in business. May be repeated with consent of instructor when the management topic is substantially different. Prerequisite: BUSN 301. 4 credits.

BUSN 440 Business Law II Sales and lease contracts, negotiable instruments, creditors’ rights and bankruptcy, agency and employment law, business organizations, and government regulation. Particular attention will be paid to provisions of the Uniform Commercial Code (“UCC”). Prerequisite: 340. 4 credits.

BUSN 443 International Finance Application of analytical techniques to financial decision making for multinational firms. Managing transaction exposure, trade finance techniques, short- and long-term financing, capital budgeting, strategic financial planning. Prerequisite: BUSN 341.

BUSN 447 Investments Formulation of investment policies, security analysis, and portfolio strategy with focus on examination of equity and fixed income investing. Consideration of mutual funds and alternative assets. Prerequisite: 341. 4 credits.

BUSN 461 Cost Accounting Accounting to meet internal management needs for planning and control. Cost accounting systems and procedures, analyses of costs and variances, and the integration of cost accounting into the overall accounting system. Prerequisite: BUSN 261; MATH 140, 160. 4 credits.

BUSN 464 Government/Not for Profit Accounting Essential characteristics of financial operations and accounting for state and local governments, voluntary health and welfare organizations, health care organizations including hospitals, and college and university accounting. Includes audit and financial management requirements of these entities. Prerequisite: BUSN 361. 4 credits.

BUSN 466 Advanced Accounting Advanced topics in financial reporting, including partnerships, business combinations, consolidated financial statements, foreign exchange transactions (including hedging of foreign exchange risk), translation of foreign statements, segmental and interim financial reporting. Prerequisite: 362. 4 credits.

BUSN 468 Federal Income Tax Theory, policies and procedures regarding federal taxation of individuals, corporations, partnerships and fiduciaries. Prerequisite: BUSN 362. 4 credits.

BUSN 469 Auditing Introduction to the field of auditing. Essential characteristics of the business and legal environment of auditing, the recognition and assessment of audit risk, and the detail process of audit execution and reporting of the results of the audit. Prerequisite: 362. 4 credits. (MWI)

BUSN 487 Internship Intensive learning experience in a business firm or other organization using accounting, business, and finance techniques. Prerequistes: GPA of at least 3.00 or higher in business major courses; junior standing with 12 credits in the Business Department completed or in progress; and approval of advisor, department chairperson, and departmental internship coordinator. One internship of at least of 3 credits may be counted toward a business major. 2-5 credits

BUSN 495 Strategic Management Integration of problem analysis, decision makIntegrated study of strategy formulation and implementation in a variety of industry and competitive settings. Builds on required functionally- oriented business courses. Prerequisites: senior standing with all other required business courses completed. 4 credits. (MWI)

Computer Science

COMP 101 Fundamentals of Information Systems Technology Broad overview of computer science. Topics include basic concepts in hardware, operating systems and networks, algorithmic problem solving, introduction to the object-oriented paradigm, and an overview of the social context of computing. No background in computer science is assumed or expected. 3 credits.

COMP 152 Programming and Object Structures Concepts of object-oriented and procedural software engineering methodologies in data definition and measurement, abstract data type construction and use in developing screen editors, reports and other IS applications. Programming in visual development environment that incorporates event driven and object-oriented design. Prerequisite: COMP 101. 4 credits.

COMP 250 Database Program Development Application program development in a database environment using a host language. Data structures, file organizations; models of data storage devices, data administration and data analysis, design and implementation. Prerequisite: COMP 152. 3 credits.

COMP 302 Software Engineering Concepts and skills to analyze, design, implement, and manage information systems using structured analysis and design methodologies. Significant real-world group projects covering all the phases of information systems development life cycle using high-level automated analysis and design tools. Experience with other important skills such as fact-finding, communications, and project management. Prerequisite: COMP 250. 5 credits. (MWI)

COMP 310 Network and Web Applications Modern applications software in business environments. Topics include: Enterprise web application development and security, web service, and XML in the enterprise. Hands-onexperience using current technology to build business-to-business (B2B) and business-toconsumer (B2C) applications. Prerequisite: COMP 250. 3 credits.

COMP 382 Management Information Systems Real world applications of information systems concepts. The value and uses of information systems for business operation, management decision making and strategic advantage. Prerequisite: BUSN 301; MATH 160, 140. 3 credits.

COMP 400 Applied Software Development Comprehensive system development project. Team approach to analyze, design, and document realistic systems of moderate complexity. Project management methods, scheduling and control, formal presentations, and group dynamics in solving systems problems. Development of a database. Prerequisite: COMP 302, 310. 3 credits.

COMP 404 Operations Management Methods for managing production and distribution of manufacturing and service systems. Capacity determination, operating systems design, operating procedures analysis, and control systems development. Prerequisite: BUSN 301; MATH 140, 160. 3 credits.

COMP 450 Database Administration Advanced data modeling and system development in a database environment using commercial database development tools and software. Trends in data management. Prerequisite: COMP 250. 3 credits. (MWI)

COMP 484 Operations Research Quantitative techniques for managerial decision-making. Linear programming, markov analysis, queuing models, network analysis and simulation. Prerequisite: BUSN 404. 3 credits.

Economics

ECON 210 Principles of Economics Survey of micro- and macroeconomic theories, institutions, and methods, emphasizing the operation of market systems in the allocation of resources and the distribution of income. Fiscal and monetary theories and policies for achieving economic stability and growth in the national economy. Prerequisite: MATH 105. 4 credits. (IS, QR)

ECON 341 Environmental Economics Analysis of the effects of economic activity and policy on the natural environment. Responses to environmental problems such as population, energy and pollution, and the impact of these responses on economic policy and performance. 4 credits. Prerequisite: 210. (IS, QR)

ECON 342 Natural Resource Economics Optimal management of natural resources such as land, water, minerals, fisheries, rangeland and forests over time. Balancing the tension between the value of natural resources as productive inputs in the present against their potential value in the future. Prerequisite: 210 or equivalent. 4 credits (IS, QR)

English

ENGL 200 Intro to Creative Writing A beginning course in creative writing. Introduces students to writing in various genres by means of creative exercises and assignments, workshops, and individual conferences. May include poetry, fiction, plays, and creative nonfiction. 4 credits. (CS)

ENGL 250 Literature of Experience An introductory study of internationally significant literature from different genres thematically organized around a particular facet of human experience or a specialized field of study such as “Crime and Punishment,,” “illness as Metaphor,” “Portraits of the Emergent Artist,” “Business as/in Literature,” “The Scientific Quest,” etc. Section topics will vary. May be repeated once for credit. 4 credits. (CS)

ENGL 270 Western American Literature Investigation into literatures and cultural issues of the American West. Study of significant western writers. May include Mark Twain, Willa Cather, Wallace Stegner, Maxine Hong Kingston, H. L. Davis, Leslie Marmon Silko, Ken Kesey or others. 4 credits. (CS, US, VP)

ENGL 301 Topics in Literature Exploration of major works of world literature dealing with a particular theme, subject, or cultural legacy. May be repeated for credit with different topics. 4 credits. (CS)

ENGL 303 Children’s Literature Literature available in various forms for children. Development of skills in the understanding as well as the presentation and teaching of the literature. 3 credits.

ENGL 304 Environmental Literature Introduction to nature writing and its lessons about the environment. Practice in writing in the genre. Authors studied may include Annie Dillard, Gary Snyder, John McPhee, Mary Austin, Edward Abbey, and Aldo Leopold. 3 credits. (CS, UQ)

ENGL 305 Diverse Voices in Literary Expression Literary works addressing issues of race, gender, class, minority experience, or national literatures besides those of the U.S. or England. May be repeated once for credit with different content. 4 credits. 4 credits. (CS, UQ, GP)

ENGL 377 Fundamentals of Research Writing Fundamentals of research writing. Bibliographic instruction and practice in writing a substantial research paper. Required for Arts & Humanities and Social & Behavioral Sciences major. 3 credits.

ENGL 380 Ultimate Questions in Lit Literary investigation into concerns fundamental to human existence such as the nature of good and evil; the origins and condition of the human being in the universe; the nature of religious guest and experience of the sacred; ethical inquiry and behavior; utopian social aspiration; the nature of religious quest and experience of the sacred; ethical inquiry and behavior; utopian social aspiration; the nature of human knowing. 4 credits. (CS, UQ)

Environmental Studies

Note: All ENVS courses apply to the Environmental Studies minor.

ENVS 040 Community Service Community Service activity helping with such environmentally related programs as parks, recycling, land-use planning, greenway cleanup and marking of bicycle and walking paths. Minimum of 35 hours of service. 1 credit. Note: May be repeated with different content.

ENVS 201 Environmental Studies Study of how humans are altering the planet; how scientific method is used to study the world; basic concepts in environmental science; use of science as a foundation to solve environmental problems. 4 credits (NW)

ENVS 203 Human Adaptive Strategies Social scientific findings and ways of understanding humanity’s place in nature and our current ecological predicament; causes and consequences (environmental, demographic, economic, political, and cultural) of humankind’s transition from food foraging to Neolithic and now inductrial adaptive strategies; scientific, policy and cultural implications and aspects of these changes and interactions through case studies at global, regional and local scales. 4 credits (IS, GP)

ENVS 302 Shoreline Ecology The oceans as a habitat for life; oceanographic processes affecting shore life; field observations of representative shore habitats of the northern Oregon coast; laboratory examinations of selected shore dwelling animals and plants. $100 fee. 3 credits (NW)

ENVS 303 Human Ecosystems Exploration of scientific concepts and principles pertaining to the interrelationships among living organisms, humans and their environments; impact of past and current human activities on these natural processes; environmental economics, politics and ethics. 3 credits. $100 fee. 3 credits. (NW, IS)

ENVS 305 Environmental Issues and the Physical Sciences An application of the physical sciences, principally the earth sciences, to understanding human impact on the earth, including such topics as radioactivity, nuclear power and nuclear waste, hazards from earthquakes, volcanoes, mining and toxic chemical wastes, water pollution, acid rain, the greenhouse effect, desertification, and problems posed by increasing urbanization and intensive agriculture. 3 credits. (NW)

ENVS 306 Fire History of the Cascades Examines the science and politics that guide national fire policy using as a case study the 92,000 acre B&B Complex Fire that burned in the Deschutes and Willamette National Forests during the summer of 2003. The class will contribute to a project documenting the effects of the B&B Complex Fire, plans for restoration, and implications of state and federal fire policy for fire management in the Deschutes National Forest. Use of the scientific method, through field research, as a way of knowing about the natural world, highlighting the process of scientific inquiry and the interplay between theoretical and experimental analysis. 3 credits. $100 fee. (NW)

ENVS 308 Water Resources Focus on the importance of water, the variety of surface and groundwater sources and the extensive use we make of them in transportation, energy, industry, agriculture and municipalities. Impacts on water resources, including overuse and pollution, along with recent efforts to improve water quality and conservation, will also be considered. 3 credits. (NW)

ENVS 485 Environmental Problem-Solving Analysis of case studies of attempts to resolve environmental problems, followed by work by student teams to resolve local environmental problems. Prerequisite: senior standing, minimum one science or ENVS course. 3 credits.

Health, Human Performance and Athletics

HHPA 062 Aerobic Fitness 1 credit (S/U).

HHPA 071 Yoga 1 credit (S/U).

HHPA 088 Backpacking 2 credits.

HHPA 100 Drug Use in US Overview of problems, issues, and research surrounding use and misuse of alcohol and other drugs in the United States. Emphasis on effective approaches toward prevention. 3 credits (US)

HHPA 180 Personal Health Promotion Health status assessed, information provided and skills taught to optimize an individual’s pursuit of a healthy lifestyle. Personal responsibility in managing one’s mental health, fitness, nutrition and stress. 2 credits.

HHPA 230 Stress Management Physiological response to stress, health consequences of unmanaged stress, models of effective stress management, and exposure to various stress management techniques. Applications to health education. 2 credits

HHPA 242 Human Sexuality An introductory overview of human sexuality topics as they relate to health including components of healthy sexuality, influences on sexuality, sexual structure and function, human sexual response, contraception, pregnancy and birth, sexually transmitted diseases, communication, love and intimacy, lifestyles, and sexual victimization. Emphasis on gender, socio-cultural factors, and sexual orientation. 3 credits. (IS)

HHPA 280 Nutrition Nutrients in foods and their relation to the physical well-being and behavior of people. Issues of current national and international concern. 3 credits. (NW)

History

HIST 122 History of World Civilization I The history of world civilizations from antiquity to the present, with topical emphases on politics, economics, and intellectual and cultural life. Emphasis on multicultural trends and global issues. 4 credits (VP, GP)

HIST 125 East Asia Since 1800 China, Japan, Korea and Vietnam from 1800 to the present. Topics include Western imperialism; nationalist and communist revolutions; the Second World War in the Pacific; rapid economic development and contemporary Asian popular culture. 4 credits (VP, GP)

HIST 150 Survey of U.S. History The United States from the 17th to the 20th century. Emphasis on social, cultural, economic, and political developments and America’s changing role in international affairs. 5 credits. (VP)

HIST 200 Modern China Analysis of Modern Chinese history during the late Qing (1842-1911), Republican (1912- 1949), and early Communist (1949-1976) periods. Chief focus on politics and foreign relations. 4 credits. (VP, GP)

HIST 210 Modern Japan Analysis of Modern Japanese history during the late Tokugawa (1800-1868), Meiji (1868- 1912), Taisho (1912-1926), and early Showa (1926-1945) periods. Chief focus on political, economic, socio-cultural developments and foreign relations. 4 credits. (VP, GP)

HIST 252 History of the US West Survey of the history of the Trans-Mississippi US West from the pre-contact period through the present. Emphasis on shape of cultural contact and exchange, role of the federal government and capitalist development, and cultural expressions of the western experience. Special attention to race, class, and gender as modes of historical analysis. 3 credits. (VP)

HIST 257 The Pacific Northwest The development of the Pacific Northwest. Early exploration and settlements. Institutional growth, urbanization, resource development. The impact of national events and trends upon the region. 3 credits. (VP)

HIST 285 Introduction to Historical Methods Training in the methods of researching and writing history. This is a prerequisite for the senior research project in history. 5 credits. (WI)

HIST 302 Topics in European History Focus on special areas of importance in Europe’s complex history such as: Victorian England, History of the Third Reich, and Military History of WWII. 3 credits. (VP, GP) Note: May be repeated once for credit with different content.

HIST 304 Topics in Latin American History Focus on special areas of importance in Latin America’s complex and multifaceted history such as: The Culture of Cities in Latin America, The Cuban Revolution, Contemporary Latin American History Through Film, Central America: From Colony to Revolution. May be repeated if topics differ. Prerequisite: sophomore standing or above. 4 credits (VP, GP).

HIST 316 History of Mexico Study of Mexican history, including Indian peoples, Spanish colonization, independence, war with the United States, the Porfiriato, the Revolution, and the modern era. Examination of social, cultural, political, economic and diplomatic developments that contributed to the development of the Mexican people. 3 credits. (VP, GP)

HIST/RELS 330 History of Religion in America History of prominent religious experiences in America. Protestant empire, Native American presence, minority appropriation, post-Christian responses. 4 credits. (UQ, VP, US)

HIST 346 Europe and the West Since 1939 A guided study course analyzing the political and diplomatic settings of the second world war, urbanization, and the industrial state, modern intellectual trends and contemporary European society. 3 credits. (VP, GP)

HIST 371 Race and Minority Cultures in the United States Indian, Spanish-speaking, African-American, and Asian ethnic groups in United States history. Cross-cultural comparisons. 3 credits. (VP, GP, US)

HIST 376 History of Soviet Russia Development of political, economic and social institutions in the U.S.S.R. Nineteenth century antecedents of the revolutionary movement with major attention to the events, developments, critical personalities and policies of the 20th century. 3 credits. (VP, GP)

HIST 390 Slavery in the Americas Comparative study of slavery in the Americas. Attempts to discover what slavery was like in the American South, Brazil, and the insular Caribbean. Historiographical approach includes work with primary source documents. 4 credits. (VP)

HIST 490 Research An opportunity for students to pursue historical research under the direction of a member of the faculty. 3-5 credits. (MWI)

Interdepartmental Studies

IDST 008 Linfield Entry Colloquium Required of ALL new students. This one-credit class addresses the special needs of adults returning to college and provides an in-depth understanding of Linfield policy and degree requirements. Paracurricular. 1 credit (S/U).

IDST 090 Global Issues Forum Readings in contemporary global issues and events and weekly discussion of them in small seminar groups. 1 credit (S/U). Note: May be repeated for credit with different content.

IDST 250 Writing the Portfolio Designing personal educational programs compatible with degree requirements; developing a portfolio of past learning; writing a short autobiography. Prerequisite: INQS 126. Required for students seeking credit for prior learning. 3 credits. Required for students seeking credit for prior learning. 3 credits.. (S/U).

IDST 320 History of Western Thought I Historical perspectives on the contributions that great works of literature and thought have made to our understanding of the world and the place of humankind in it. Great works from ancient and classical Greece and Rome, the Middle Ages, the Renaissance and Reformation, and the modern and contemporary world. 3 credits. (VP, UQ, GP)

IDST 321 History of Western Thought II Historical perspectives on the contributions that great works of literature and thought have made to our understanding of the world and the place of humankind in it. Great works from ancient and classical Greece and Rome, the Middle Ages, the Renaissance and Reformation, and the modern and contemporary world. Prerequisite: for A&H senior semester. 3 credits. (VP, UQ, GP)

IDST 485 Arts and Humanities Senior Seminar Capstone experience for senior Arts & Humanities majors. Exploration of themes central to the arts and humanities. The seminar provides the context in which the student will develop a project proposal for the major. 3 credits.

IDST 490 Arts and Humanities Research Project Completion of the project formulated and approved in IDS 485. Prerequisite: ENGL 377. 3 credits.

Inquiry Seminar

INQS 126 Inquiry Seminar A collaborative investigation of a compelling subject, building upon the relationship between thinking and communication, both oral and written. It models the goals of the entire Linfield Curriculum by developing the critical thinking skills common to every discipline. 4 credits. (INQS)

Mathematics

MATH 105 Intermediate Algebra Number systems and their properties, solving linear and quadratic equations, solving systems of equations, polynomials and factoring, graphing linear and quadratic equations, graphing inequalities, exponents and radicals, operations on rational functions. 3 credits.

MATH 110 Great Ideas in Mathematics The beauty and significance of mathematics in the history of human thought. Topics include primes, the pigeonhole principle, the Fibonacci sequence, infinity, chaos and fractuals. Not for General Science majors. Prerequisites: high school algebra I and geometry, or equivalent. 3 credits. (QR)

MATH 140 Introduction to Statistics An introduction to probability and statistics including methods of summarizing and describing data, basics of probability, distribution of random variables and probability distributions including the normal curve, inferential statistics including hypothesis testing and decision making, linear regression and correlation. Additional topics may include chi-square analysis and analysis of variance. Prerequisite: 105, or high school algebra I and II and geometry or equivalent. 3 credits. (QR)

MATH 160 Finite Mathematics with Calculus Review of algebra including equations, inequalities, functions, graphs, logarithms and exponentials. Topics in finite mathematics including matrix algebra and linear programming. Introduction to differential calculus and use in optimization. Prerequisite: MATH 105. Meets the mathematics requirement for business major. 5 credits.

MATH 161 Introduction to Finite Mathematics Review of algebra including linear and quadratic equations, inequalities, functions, graphs. Applications in business, economics and the social and behavioral sciences. MATH 161 and 162 are the equivalent of MATH 160. Prerequisite: MATH 105. 2 credits.

MATH 162 Finite Mathematics and Calculus A continuation of 161, including logarithmic and exponential functions, and topics in finite mathematics, including matrix algebra and linear programming. An introduction to differential calculus and its use in optimization. Applications in business, economics, and the social and behavioral sciences. MATH 161 and 162 are the equivalent of MATH 160. Prerequisite: MATH 161. 3 credits.

Modern Languages

MLCH 211 Introduction to East Asian Culture Introduction to East Asian thought and culture. Critical appreciation of distinctive cultural achievements of China, Korea, Japan and Vietnam. Exposure to the visual arts, music, theater and literatures of the region. Themes include tradition vs. modernity, the role of the individual in society, and the role of gender in traditional culture. No background in an Asian language is required. 3 credits. (CS, GP)

Music

MUSC 135 Understanding Jazz The essence of jazz music. Knowledgeable listening. Historical and sociological background of jazz and the people who created it. 3 credits. (CS, US)

Nursing

NURS 309 Transition to Professional Nursing Practice A transition to baccalaureate nursing practice for the Registered Nurse student. Builds on previous knowledge and skills applicable to the practice of professional nursing. Prerequisites: Admission to the RN to BSN Program. 6 credits

NURS 315: Professional Communication in Diverse Communities Preparation for professional practice including communicating with clients and collaborating with other professionals in interdisciplinary settings. Prerequisite or co-requisite: NURS 309. 2 credits.

NURS 320: Scholarship of Nursing Concepts necessary to engage in evidence-based nursing practice including the research process and scholarly communication. Prerequisites: NURS 309, 315. 3 credits. (QR)

NURS 348: Gerontological Nursing In-depth gerontologcal nursing theory. Students explore knowledge from nursing and other scientific and humanistic disciplines in providing nursing care for the older adult client in the context of family, group and community. 2 credits.

NURS 358: HIV Nursing: Caring & Concepts Overview of HIV infection to include current concepts and analyses of societal impact from both global and local perspectives. Examination of developmnet of therapeutic tools and skills to educate, reduce risks, control infection, and affect care and healing of adult and children clients, family members, and community from a nursing perspective. 3 credits (UQ)

NURS 362 Palliative Care in Nursing Overview of palliative nursing as a scientific and humanistic approach to caring for individuals experiencing life-limiting illness. Examines approaches to care that combine compassion with quality care measures that address physical, psychological, social, spiritual, cultural, and existential aspects of holistic care of the individual and family across the lifespan. Prerequisites: RN-BSN: 309 or instructor approval. BSN: 355. 3 credits (UQ)

NURS 460: Population-based Nursing in a Multicultural and Global Society Healthcare issues and interventions from multicultural, domestic and global perspectives. Prerequisites: NURS 309, 315. Co-requisites: NURS 320. 2 credits.

NURS 470: Leading and Managing in Nursing Principles of organizational healthcare management, healthcare policy, and the role of the nurse leader in healthcare organizations. Prerequisites: NURS 309, 315. Prerequisite or co-requisites: NURS 320, 460. 3 credits. (MWI)

NURS 475: Immersion experience in nursing. Experiential learning that incorporates simulation and practice in leadership, management and populationbased nursing care. 8 credits Prerequisites: NURS 320, 460, 470. 8 credits.

Philosophy

PHIL 150 Fundamentals of Philosophy Philosophic ideas and problems at the root of human culture. Major Western views of self, conduct, and meaning. 4 credits. (UQ)

PHIL 160 Philosophy East and West Comparative introductory study of major philosophical traditions of east and west: ethics, metaphysics, epistemology, philosophy of religion. 4 credits. (UQ or GP)

PHIL 215 Bioethics Case studies and primary source readings highlighting central theories, issues, and problems in bioethics, generally, and biomedical ethics, specifically. Bioethical concerns including the right to live and die, paternalism versus autonomy and the patient’s bill of rights, biomedical experimentation and research, reproductive technologies, social and institutional justice, and healthcare duties, responsibilities, and relationships. Both normative ethics and metaethics considered. 4 credits. (UQ, WI)

PHIL 245 Aesthetics Survey of aesthetic theories that engages issues such as definition of art, relationship between art and truth, role of expression, nature of aesthetic experience, artistic creation, relevance of beauty, autonomy of art, women and art, and non-Western conceptions of art. Selections from classical and contemporary aestheticians may include figures such as Plato, Kant, Hume, Nietzsche, Danto, Dewey Margolis, Weitz, besides others. 4 credits. (UQ, CS)

PHIL 250 Modern Philosophy Historical survey of modern philosophy, emphasizing but not limited to rationalism and empiricism. Primary readings may include key representatives such Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Locke, Berkeley, Hume, Kant, and others. Offered spring of even-numbered years. 4 credits ( UQ, WI)

PHIL 306 Environmental Ethics Moral and aesthetic reasoning applies to questions of value about land, air, water and human species. Particular attention to issues surrounding human disruption of ecosystem. 4 credits. (UQ)

PHIL 365 Social & Political Philosophy Examination of major topics in social/moral and political philosophy, such as: freedom and liberty, order and revolution, peace and justice, rights and representation, power and authority, individual and community. Concepts and issues will be studied via an examination of selected primary source texts, both classical and contemporary. Offered fall of even-numbered years. 4 credits (UQ)

Physics

PHYS 107 Energy & the Environment Introduction to the concept of energy (kinetic, potential, thermal) and the physical laws governing energy transformation. Form of energy consumed by society (fossil fuels, nuclear power, renewable energy) and their impacts on the environment nuclear waste, global warming, air pollution). 3 credits. (QR)

Political Science

POLS 210 International Politics Nature of the state system and the conduct of international diplomacy in the nuclear age. Causes of instability and conflict and the various means aimed at conflict resolution. 4 credits (IS , GP)

POLS 310 American Political Thought American political thought from colonial times to the present. Consideration of how the political theories of early American thinkers addressed the problems of their age and relate to modern problems and issues. Theories of change and resolution. Application of contemporary theories from various areas in society to evolutionary trends in American thought. 4 credits (UQ, US)

POLS 372 Islamic Movements Consideration of the various forms taken by Islamist movements as influenced by the country contexts within which they are embedded. Comparative methodology is used to examine important similiarities and differences across movements and country cases to explain political outcomes, such as violence or moderation. 4 credits (IS, GP)

POLS 384 US Foreign Policy History, conduct, and politics of U.S. foreign policy. Specific current problems used to highlight connections between past and present, illuminating domestic political determinants of foreign policy and promoting civic engagement. 4 credits (IS, VP)

POLS 386 Topics in Comparative Politics Comparison of the major political institutions and processes of nations in the same region, or of one nation with those of the United States and other nations with which a student is familiar. Possible foci: Britain, Canada, Germany, Latin America, Africa, and Western Europe. 3 credits. (IS, GP)

Psychology

PSYC 101 Survey of Psychology The study of human behavior. Neurological mechanisms, individual differences, dysfunctional behavior, and social processes. 3 credits. (IS, NW)

PSYC 155 Lifespan Development Psychology The study of human behavior. Neurological mechanisms, individual differences, dysfunctional behavior, and social processes. 4 credits. (IS)

PSYC 200 Social Psychology The individual in a variety of social settings. Interaction at the inter-person, intra-group and inter-group levels. Social interaction, attitudes, attributions, aggression, altruism, affiliation, conformity, environment, nonverbal communication. Research, theory, and application. Class discussion, projects. Prerequisite: PSYC 101. 3 credits.

PSYC 262 Perspectives on Gender Gender socialization and its institutional manifestations in the growth of individuals and cultural alternatives. 4 credits. (UQ, US)

PSYC 340 Learning, Memory, and BehaviorSpecialized focus on new developments, advanced topics, or subjects of current interest in psychology. Lecture/lab or seminar format. May be repeated once for credit with different content. Prerequisite: 250 or consent of instructor. 4 credits

PSYC 355 Learning, Memory, and Behavior Human adaptation to environmental and social situations. Principles and theories of learning and memory, application to everyday life. Prerequisite: PSYC 101. 3 credits.

PSYC 367 Psychology East and West Introduction to cross-cultural issues in personality and clinical psychology with emphasis on Western and Asian perspectives. Does not count toward the Psychology major or minor. Offered through DCE only. Prerequisite: PSYC 101. 4 credits. (IS, GP, UQ)

PSYC 375 Theories of Personality Introduction to cross-cutural issues in personality and clinical psychology with emphasis on Western and Asian perspectives. Prerequisite: PSYC 101. 3 credits.

PSYC 391 Abnormal Psychology Clinical psychology and the study of dysfunctional behavior, with emphasis on theoretical issues and research, assessment and strategies of treatment intervention. Prerequisite: PSYC 101. 3 credits.

Religious Studies

RELS 120 Old Testament Literature of the Old Testament: its form, content, historical development, and interpretation. 4 credits. (UQ, VP)

RELS 130 New Testament Literature of the New Testament: its form, content, historical development, and interpretation. 4 credits. (UQ, VP)

RELS 140 Holy Qur’an Literature of the Qur’an: its form, content, historical development, and interpretation. Course designed especially for students with some familiarity with Old and New testament narrative. Provides students an opportunity for further study of the major world faith that is Islam. 4 credits. (UQ, VP, GP)

RELS/ANTH 254 Folklore and Mythology Comparative anthropological study of traditional oral literatures; myths, legends, folktales, riddles, proverbs, jokes. Dynamics of folklore, its creation, performance, and transmission; functions of folklore and myth in diverse cultures, including the contemporary United States. 4 credits.

RELS 303 Religious Quest I Aspects of several world religions, stressing stories told about the founders and descriptions of the religions’ followers, styles of life and ways of worship. 3 credits. (UQ, GP)

RELS 304 Religious Quest II Aspects of primitive religions, folk religions, and cult movements. Varieties of religious experience in East and West, ancient and modern, with special emphasis on secularization, Soviet Marxism and American religious behavior. Prerequisite: or co-requisite: RELS 303. 3 credits. (UQ)

RELS/HIST 330 History of Religion in America History of prominent religious experiences in America. Protestant empire, Native American presence, minority appropriation, post-Christian responses. 4 credits. (UQ, VP, US)

RELS 360 Dead Sea Scrolls The discovery, content, and historical context of the Dead Sea Scrolls. What the Scrolls tell us about Second Temple Judaism, the origins of Christianity, the history of the biblical text, the Qumran community. Making the scrolls available to the general public. NOTE: Not open to those who have taken INQS 125 "The Dead Sea Scrolls." 4 credits. (UQ or VP)

RELS 380 Buddhism This course examines the Buddhist understanding of the causes of suffering, its mitigation, the variety of styles and practices in which this attempt at mitigation appears in both the east and west. 4 credits. (UQ, GP)

Sociology and Anthropology

ANTH/BIOL 105 Human Biology & Evolution Principles of human biology and evolution, dealing with the genetics, physiology, and behavior of humans and other primates. Study of the relationships between biology and culture. Emphasis on the theory of evolution, its application to humans, and recent discoveries in the field of human prehistory. Lecture, readings, films, essays, and discussion. 3 credits. (NW)

ANTH 111 Cultural Anthropology Anthropological study of culture and society; world cultures and their variation in social, political, and economic organization, belief systems and world view, material culture and the arts, patterns of adaptation. Assumptions, concepts, and methods of anthropologists. 4 credits. (IS, GP)

ANTH 112 Archaeology and World Prehistory Survey of world socio-cultural evolution from the Lower Paleolithic through the Neolithic Transition to the rise of complex societies and agrarian state systems. What archaeologists have learned about the past and how they have learned it. Key issues and sites in prehistoric archaeology and the relevance of these discoveries for our understanding of humanity. Includes laboratory. 4 credits (VP)

ANTH/RELS 254 Folklore and Mythology Comparative anthropological study of traditional oral literature: myths, legends, folktales, riddles, proverbs, jokes. Dynamics of folklore, its creation, performance, and transmission; functions of folklore and myth in diverse cultures, including the contemporary United States. 4 credits.

ANTH 326 Archaeological Field Methods Theories and methods of archaeology. On-site training in methods of survey, excavation, laboratory analysis, and report writing. Integration of archaeological data within a larger anthropological and environmental framework. 5 credits.

ANTH 332 Medical Anthropology A biocultural approach to problems of health and illness. Integrated understanding through empirical research on ritual and belief systems, health practitioners, curing techniques and delivery systems; nutrition; fertility and population control; environmental factors in disease; evolutionary perspective on disease and human adaptability. 3 credits. (IS, GP)

SOAN 205 Gender and Society Historical and cultural conceptualizations of gender, gender identity, theoretical overview of gender differences and gender inequality, gender meaning in symbolic representation and institutional practices. The role of gender in contemporary political, economic, and social issues. 4 credits. (IS, US)

SOAN 222 Mexico, Central America, and the Caribbean: Society and Culture Social organizations and cultures of Mexico, Central America, and the Caribbean. Patterns of economic, political, and social organization, including ethnicity, gender, race, class, and other social cleavages. Migration to the United States and effects on U.S. society, including Latinas and Latinos, Rastafarian influences, and U.S. migration policy. 4 credits. (GP, IS)

SOAN 225 People & Cultures of North America: The Native Americans Indigenous people of North America: prehistory and patterns of adaptation, culture areas and the diversity of cultural configurations prior to European colonization, history of Indian-white relations, Native Americans today. 4 credits.

SOAN 240 Utopias and Dystopias Exploration of theory of utopic and dystopic thought, social theory and their representation in works of science fiction. Specific areas of focus include gender and sex, sexual orientation, race, societal structure, war, terrorism, peace, inequality and political theory. 4 credits. (IS or UQ)

SOAN 265 Race & Ethnicity Racial and ethnic minorities in the United States. Historical knowledge of role of race in formation of U.S.; current state of dominantminority relations. 4 credits. (IS, US)

SOAN 270 Latinos and Latinas in the U.S. Examination of major Latina/o subpopulations, including immigration history, population trends, general socio-cultural tendencies. Specific topics of migration and border studies, gender and family, labor and gender. Latina/o politics and policy, poverty, identity and citizenship issues arising among various Latina/o subgroups as they experience and affect U.S. society and culture. 4 credits. (IS, US)

SOAN 308 Social Research Methods For future researchers and consumers of research. Designs for research on social behavior, data collection, and analysis; reporting results; funding of research; uses of research in social work, government and management. 3 credits.

SOAN 360 Sociology of Culture Major perspectives in the study of culture: culturalism, structuralism, post-structuralism, Marxism, feminism, postmodernism; theoretical and empirical scholarship of contemporary culture with emphasis on the U.S.; methodological issues for studying culture. Prerequisite: SOCL 101 or ANTH 111. 4 credits. (IS, US)

SOAN 365 Urban Society and Culture Historical emergence of the pre-industrial city; pre-modern experiments in city systems; modernization, industrialization and urbanization; structure of the modern city; urban politics, urban social problems, semiotics and interpretation of urban space. Prerequisite: SOCL 101 or ANTH 111. 4 credits. (IS)

SOAN 487 Internship Student participation in an organization whose activities relate to vocations requiring preparation in sociology, social work or anthropology. Supplemented with appropriate readings and reports. Arranged with the internship supervisor. Prerequisite: approval of departmental internship supervisor. 2-10 credits.

SOAN 490 Research/Thesis Intensive research on a topic of special interest to the student, leading to a thesis. Prerequisite: ENGL 377 and grade of C or better in SOAN 308. 4 credits.

SOCL 101 Fundamentals of Sociology Sociological concepts, explanations of social organization and social behavior. How and why people organize through social roles, intimate groupings, and large organizations. Relation of sociology as a social science to human welfare. 4 credits. (IS, US)

SOCL 201 Deviance: Individual and Society Definitions, cultural contexts and power issues surrounding deviance. Power-conflict, structural-functionalist, control and labeling theoretical understandings of such issues as violent behavior, white- and blue-collar crime, social control, race, alcohol and alcoholism, drug use, heterosexual deviance, male and female homosexuality, mental disorder and mental institutions. 4 credits. (IS, US)

SOCL 206 Social Work Practice Methods of social work with individuals, families and other groups, from intake interview to termination. Ways social workers use private, voluntary and government resources. Practical problems and the skills needed to accomplish objectives within the limits of laws and policies. 3 credits.

SOCL 297 Topics in Applied Sociology and Social Work Introductory-level course focusing on key issues in social work and applied sociology, such as addictions, homelessness, domestic violence, and poverty. May be repeated once for credit with different content. Prerequisites: SOCL 101 or consent of instructor. 3 credits (IS)

Theatre & Communication Arts

TCCA 230 Intercultural Communication: Global Perspective Theory and practice of human communication in a multicultural world. Interdisciplinary and global perspectives on the social and cultural contexts of communication, both in terms of interpersonal interaction as well as larger scale contact between cultures. Emphasis on perception, values, enculturation, acculturation, verbal and nonverbal language systems, strategies for effective intercultural interaction. Strongly recommended for students planning to participate in Linfield’s Study Abroad programs. 3 credits (IS or GP)