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Welcome to CHEM 211 - General Chemistry II

Instructors

Section 1: 8:15 - 9:20 am; M/W/F, RENH 201
Section 3: 10:45 - 11:50 am; M/W/F, RENH 201

Dr. Megan Bestwick

Office: 
Murdock Hall 120

Office Hours: By Appointment

Email: mbestwic@linfield.edu

Section 2: 9:30 - 10:35 am; M/W/F, RENH 201
 

Dr. James Diamond

Office: 
Murdock Hall 116

Office Hours: By Appointment

Email: jimd@linfield.edu

Lab (various times, Murdock 106)

Amy Wolcott

Office: 
Murdock Hall 112

Office Hours: By Appointment

Email: awolcott@linfield.edu

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 






Course Materials

Syllabus - All sections follow the same syllabus

Chemistry: Structure and Dynamics (5th Ed.),  J.N. Spencer, G.M. Bodner, L.H. Rickard (ISBN: 978-0-470-58711-9)

Chemistry: A Guided Inquiry (5th Ed.), R.S. Moog, J.J. Farrell  (ISBN: 978-0-470-64790-5)

A non-programmable scientific calculator (Graphing and programmable calculators will not be allowed during exams)

Laboratory notebook (available at the bookstore, or from the chemistry club)

Laboratory goggles (available at the bookstore, or from the chemistry club)

Sapling Learning
- online homework website (registration instructions and enrollment key)

 

Schedule

All sections follow the same schedule

Note: This schedule may be revised at any time.  Be sure to check here frequently.  Activities are from Moog & Farrell's book, unless otherwise indicated.  Assigned readings are from Spencer, Bodner & Ricard's text.
Date ChemActivity  (Readings from Spencer in parentheses) Lab  
Feb. 10 Introduction & course overview Lab 1 - How can the relationship between absorbance and concentration be used to identify the amount of dye present in a sample?
Feb. 12 CA 36 - Rates of Chemical Reactions (I)  (10.3, 14.6)
Feb. 14 CA 37 - Equilibrium (I)  (10.1 - 10.2)
Feb. 17 CA 38 - Equilibrium (II)  (10.4 - 10.5)
Lab 2 - How can a chemical equilibrium be shifted?
Feb. 19 CA 39 - The Equilibrium Constant (I)  (10.4 - 10.5)
Feb. 21 CA 40 - The Reaction Quotient  (10.6 - 10.11)
Feb. 24 CA 40 - The Reaction Quotient (cont.)  (10.6 - 10.11) Lab 3 - Determination of the formation constant of a complex ion
Feb. 26 CA 41 - The Solubility Product  (10.12 - 10.16 )
Feb. 28 Review Session - Exam I - Study Guide for Exam I
Mar. 3 CA 42 - Acids and Bases  (11.1 - 11.4) Lab 4 - Titration of Acetic Acid
Mar. 5 CA 43 - Acid Strength  (11.5 - 11.6 )
Mar. 7 Exam I: CA 36 - 41
Mar. 10 CA 43 - Acid Strength (cont.)  (11.5 - 11.6 ) Lab 5 - Analysis of Commercial Antacids
Mar. 12 CA 44 - Weak Acid/Base Dissociation  (11.8 - 11.10, 11A1-A3)
Mar. 14  CA 45 - pH  (11.7, 11.12 - 11.14)
Mar. 17 No Class - Complete Problem Set Lab 6 - How can the pH be changed?
Mar. 19 CA 46 - Relative Acid Strength  (11.8 - 11.9)
Mar. 21 Buffers - Handout  ( 11.15 - 11.18)
Mar. 24 - 28: Spring break
 
Mar. 31 CA 47 - Acid/Base Strength of Conjugate Pairs  (11.10 - 11.11) Lab 7 - Buffer Capacity
Apr. 2 Acid-Base Titrations - Handout  (11.18 - 11.19)
Apr. 4 CA 48 & 49 - Oxidation-Reduction Reactions and Oxidation Numbers  (12.2, 12.3, 12.5)
Apr. 7 Review Session - Exam II - Study Guide for Exam II Lab 8 - Which metals provide the best voltage?
Apr. 9 CA 50 - The Electrochemical Cell  (12.4 - 12.7)
Apr. 11 Exam II: CA42 - 49
Apr. 14 CA 50 - The Electrochemical Cell (cont.)  (12.4 - 12.7) Lab 9 - Electrolytic Processes and Faraday's Constant
Apr. 16 CA 51 - The Cell Voltage  (12.8 - 12.12)
Apr. 18 CA 52 - Entropy (I)  (13.1 - 13.3)
Apr. 21 CA 53 - Entropy (II)  (13.1 - 13.3 ) Lab 10 - Solubility and Thermodynamics
Apr. 23 CA 54 - Entropy Changes in Chemical Reactions   (13.4 - 13.6 )
Apr. 25 CA 55 - The Equilibrium Constant (II)  (13.7 - 13.9)
Apr. 28 CA 56 - The Equilibrium Constant (III)  (13.10 - 13.15) Lab 11 - Kinetic Study of a Chemical Reaction
Apr. 30 CA 57 - Rates of Chemical Reactions (II)  (14.1 - 14.7 )
May 2 CA 58 - Integrated Rate Laws  (14.13 - 14.15)
May 5 Review Session - Exam III - Study Guide for Exam III Lab 12 - Kinetics Open Inquiry
May 7 CA 59 & CA62 - Reaction Mechanisms (I) & Activation Energy CTQs  (14.8 - 14.9 & 14.16, 14.8)
May 9 Exam III: CA 50 - 58

May 12 CA 60 - Reaction Mechanisms (II)  (14.10 - 14.11) Check-out
May 14 CA 61 - Reaction Mechanisms (III)  (14.17, 14.18)
May 16 CA 62 - Activation Energy Exercises/Problems  (14.16, 14.18)
May 19 Colligative Properties - Handout  (8A.1 - 8A.4) Free week.  Stay out of trouble.
May 21 Review Session - Final Exam
May 22 Reading Day 
May 23

Final Exam - Friday, May 23 at 1:00 pm 

 

 Schedule updated: April 2, 2014


 

Old Exams

These exams are to be used as study and review aids.  You should NOT expect exactly the same questions to appear on exams this semester, or for the coverage of the exams to match what is on this semester's exams.  The best way to use these is to see if you can sit down and do them in an exam - like environment.  Go somewhere quiet for an hour and see how far you can get.

          Will be posted close to exam dates

Useful Links

Ions - a list of common ions, symbols and names

Nomenclature tree - systematic nomenclature for common inorganic binary compounds

Khan Academy - a wide variety of online chemistry lectures


Tutors

Group tutoring is available 7:00pm to 9:00 pm Sunday through Thursday nights in the fishbowl (Murdock 113).

 

Study Tips

  • Jonathan Gutow's tips:  How to Study for College Science Classes; How to Prepare for Science Tests
  • Do lab reports, assigned book problems and computer problems on time!
  • In general
    • Make a schedule - 2 hours a day minimum on chemistry homework, every day.
    • Make sure your total hours of work, class, lab, study, practice, clubs, sports, etc. add up to 55 hours or less.  NO MORE!If you’re over-extended, cut back on non-academic commitments.
    • Learn how to use short breaks (10-15 minutes) for effective studying. Read outlines, chapter summaries, pre-labs, worksheets, etc.
    • Keep a journal - record your study times, questions, thoughts, ideas. Read it when your prepare for tests.
    • Note Taking - Tips on how to develop a set of course notes
    • Reading for Understanding - The SQR3 method
  • In class
    • Be an active participant in the activities.  
    • Rephrase what your group members say.
    • Make notes to yourself about things that remain unclear (follow up after class).
    • Take notes. Your notes should be meaningful. Always write down when your prof says something is important.
    • Make sure you understand the principles underlying every classroom example.
  • Between classes
    • Outline your notes after every class. Relate the chapter summaries and keywords to class activities and discussion.
    • Use the chapter summaries to help you understand old tests and quizzes - what is important, what errors can one make, what chemistry context underlies each problem.
    • Understand all of the assigned book problems and computer problems before each quiz or test.
    • Use a non-programmable (or graphing) calculator so you know how to use it on the exams.
    • GO TO THE FISHBOWL for help from the tutors!
    • Get all lab assignments in on time.
    • When you have specific questions, go to office hours.
    • Vary your study location.  
    • Test your self frequently - close the book, hide examples and see if you can solve problems without having to look back through notes or the texts.
  • To prepare for an exam
    • Review outlined notes, activity & book problems, and look at your lab questions.
    • Practice by trying problems you have not done before.  Time yourself , and try to pace yourself so you finish them in 2 - 5 minutes. 
    • Try to avoid looking through your books and notes. IF YOU ARE FIGURING THINGS OUT AS YOU GO, YOU DO NOT YET UNDERSTAND THE PRINCIPLES UNDERLYING THAT PROBLEM.
  • While taking the exam
    • Bring your calculator (non programmable or graphing) - be sure you know how to use it. Make sure you have pencils, erasers, and your eyeglasses, if needed.
    • Read the entire exam before starting work on a problem. Do the problems you are sure of first.
    • On multiple choice questions, eliminate the answers you know are incorrect.
    • Do not leave problems blank. Write down relevant information, and try to describe how to solve the problem in your own words.
    • Once you have read through the exam, do not spend any time without writing, except for brief moments. You should be working steadily through most of the exam period.
    • Learn to relax. Every ten to fifteen minutes, take a brief moment to unwind, gather your thoughts, and reorient yourself to your task. Then get right back to work.
    • Try to pace yourself so that you have a few minutes at the end of the exam to review your work.