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Full Course List

This list may not include study abroad classes or new classes that have not been scheduled. Please contact the department or Registrar's office if you have questions.

Courses

Portland Campus Courses

Adult Degree Program Courses

McMinnville Campus Courses

Art and Visual Culture

AAVC-100  INTRODUCTION TO STUDIO

Image management, design, critical approaches and creative studio practices in a variety of media.
$50 lab fee. 4 credits (CS)

AAVC-101  Studio Practices STRATEGIES)

Multi-dimensional design, critical approaches and creative studio practices in a variety of media.
$50 lab fee.
Prerequisite: 100. Offered spring. 4 credits.

AAVC-210  SURVEY OF NON-WESTERN VISUAL CULTURES

Introductory survey covering non-European visual cultures. Intended to develop an awareness of diverse cultures through analysis of art works in various media.
$25 lab fee. Offered fall. 4 credits. (CS or GP)

AAVC-217  HISTORY OF GRAPHIC DESIGN

Survey examines typographic traditions, aesthetic theories and innovative technologies used by graphic designers throughout history regarding interactions between texts and images from cave paintings to the internet. Emphasis on major movements, such as Arts and Crafts, the Bauhaus, and the New York School.
$25 lab fee. 4 credits. (CS or VP)

AAVC-218  HISTORY OF PHOTOGRAPHY

Study of the history of photography from its invention to its prominence in the contemporary art world. Emphasis on photography as a form of artistic expression but also considers photojournalism and documentary uses of photographs. Emphasis on major movements such as pictorialism, new vision, and postmodernism.
$25 lab fee. Offered spring of odd-numbered years. 4 credits. (CS or VP)

AAVC-220  APPROACHES TO THE FIGURE

Expressive, technical, critical and thematic development working from the human figure in a variety of media. May be repeated once for credit.
$50 lab fee.
Prerequisite: 120 or consent of instructor. Offered spring. 4 credits. (CS)

AAVC-225  DRAWING II: WORKS ON PAPER

Studio in traditional and contemporary works on paper in diverse media. Deepening of basic skills introduced in AAVC 120. Portfolio development supported by written artist statements leading to a coherent suite of works on paper.
$50 lab fee.
Prerequisite: 120 or consent of instructor. Offered spring of even numbered years. 4 credits. (CS)

AAVC-231  CERAMICS II

Intermediate work in either handbuilding or wheel. Emphasis on glaze calculation and firing techniques. May be repeated twice for credit.
$50 lab fee.
Prerequisite: 130 or consent of instructor. 4 credits. (CS)

AAVC-232  CERAMIC SCULPTURE

Intermediate clay work with emphasis on sculptural concepts. Investigation into the creative range of the medium. May be repeated twice for credit.
$50 lab fee.
Prerequisite: 130 or consent of instructor. Offered spring. 4 credits. (CS)

AAVC-240  PHOTOGRAPHY I

Basics of creative black and white photography: camera operations, principles of exposure, darkroom technique, visual elements of design, and introduction to historical and contemporary trends.
$50 lab fee.
Prerequisite: 100 or consent of instructor. Offered spring. 4 credits. (CS)

AAVC-242  DIGITAL MEDIA IN VISUAL ARTS

Introduction to emerging technology in the visual arts. Principles of image capture, manipulation, and output. Emphasis will be placed on an intermediate approach using the computer as an expressive tool.
$50 lab fee.
Prerequisite: 100 or consent of instructor. Offered spring. 4 credits. (CS)

AAVC-243  DIGITAL COLOR PHOTOGRAPHY

Standard photographic techniques for color photography with both analog and digital technology. Camera operations, digital image editing, video editing, and critical evaluation of the photographic medium. May be repeated once for credit.
$50 lab fee.
Prerequisite: 100 or consent of instructor. Offered spring. 4 credits. (CS)

AAVC-244  DIGITAL VIDEO

Introduction to industry standard audio and video programs. Exploration of video practices and techniques from concept to completion including camera operations, subject matter, and writing story boards. May be repeated once for credit.
$50 lab fee.
Prerequisite: 100 or consent of instructor. Offered spring. 4 credits (CS)

AAVC-245  TEXT, IMAGE, NARRATIVE AND THE ARTIST BOOK

An introductory studio workshop for the exploration of artist books as a contemporary art form. Emphasis on hands-on student projects and discussion of theoretical issues pertinent to book arts. Issues of time, sequence, and context addressed via critical readings, critique and discussion.
$50 lab fee. 4 credits. (CS) AAVC 250 Sculpture I Beginning studio investigation into a variety of sculptural practices and media.
$50 lab fee.
Prerequisite: 100. 4 credits. (CS)

AAVC-250  SCULPTURE I

Beginning studio investigation into a variety ofsculptural practices and media.
$50 lab fee.
Prerequisite: 100.4 credits (CS)

AAVC-270  PRINTMAKING I

History and use of intaglio media, including drypoint, etching, aquatint, mezzotint and engraving.
$50 lab fee.
Prerequisite: 120 or consent of instructor. Offered fall and spring. 4 credits. (CS)

AAVC-280  GLASSWORKS

Studio approaches in glassworking. May be repeated once for credit.
$300 lab fee.
Prerequisites: 100 or 101; 120 recommended. Offered spring. 4 credits.

AAVC-281  ALTERNATIVE MEDIA

Studio in mixed and nontraditional art media and related theory, critical analysis and practices. Studio projects may include performance, installation and electronic art forms.
$50 lab fee.
Prerequisite: 100 or consent of instructor. 4 credits. (CS)

AAVC-310  MODERN ART 1863-1945

The development of visual arts from Realism to Surrealism. Emphasis on major movements such as Impressionism, Cubism, Dada.
$25 lab fee.
Prerequisite: INQS 125. Offered fall. 4 credits (CS or VP or GP, MWI)

AAVC-316  TOPICS IN VISUAL CULTURE

Selected topics, such as Power in the Ancient World, Pre-Columbian Visual Symbolism, European and African diaspora, or the imagery of commerce. Topics will vary from year to year. May be repeated with different content.
$25 lab fee.
Prerequisite: INQS 125. 4 credits. (CS or VP)

AAVC-319  POSTMODERN ART 1945 TO THE PRESENT

The development of the visual arts from late Modernism to the present day. Emphasis on major movements such as Abstract Expressionism, Minimalism and Conceptual Art.
$25 lab fee.
Prerequisites: 110 and INQS 125. Offered spring. 4 credits. (CS or VP or GP)

AAVC-339  ADVANCED STUDIO: SCULPTURE

Advanced studies of technical skills in sculpture involving a variety of forming methods, firing techniques, and calculation of chemical interactions of ceramic glazes and their formation. May be repeated for credit.
$50 lab fee.
Prerequisites: 130, 231, or consent of instructor. Offered spring semester. 4 credits.

AAVC-340  PHOTOGRAPHY II

Photographic techniques with emphasis on critical skills and the development of an independent body of work. May be repeated twice for credit.
$50 lab fee.
Prerequisite: 240. Offered fall. 4 credits. (CS)

AAVC-342  DIGITAL MEDIA II

Intermediate techniques in graphic design and emerging technology in the visual arts through a semester long independent project. May be repeated once for credit.
$50 lab fee.
Prerequisites:101 and 242. Offered fall. 4 credits. (CS)

AAVC-349  ADVANCED STUDIO: PHOTOGRAPHY

Advanced studies of critical and technical skills in digital and analog photography. May be repeated for credit.
$50 lab fee.
Prerequisites: 240 or 243 or MSCM 322, or consent of instructor. Offered spring semester of alternating years. 4 credits.

AAVC-350  SCULPTURE II

Intermediate studio investigation into sculptural concepts, culminating in a major project. May be repeated twice for credit.
$50 lab fee.
Prerequisite: 250 or consent of instructor. Offered spring. 4 credits. (CS)

AAVC-360  PAINTING II

Intermediate work in painting in any medium emphasizing visual, thematic and critical continuity through the development of a body of work supported by artist statements. May be repeated twice for credit.
$50 lab fee.
Prerequisite: 260 or consent of instructor. Offered fall. 4 credits. (CS)

AAVC-369  ADVANCED STUDIO: 2-D

Advanced studies of critical and technical skills in painting, drawing and/or printmaking. May be repeated for credit.
Prerequisites: 100, 101, 120, 262 or 270, or consent of instructor. Offered spring. 4 credits.

AAVC-370  PRINTMAKING II

Intermediate printmaking, including multiple color and mixed techniques. May be repeated twice for credit.
$50 lab fee.
Prerequisite: 270 or consent of instructor. Offered January term or spring. 4 credits. (CS)

AAVC-381  ALTERNATIVE MEDIA II

Advanced studio practice in non-traditional artmedia. Student-designed projects may includeperformance, installation, site-specific/earth-works, conceptual art, video, and digitizedimagery or mixed media. May be repeated twice forcredit.
$50 lab fee.
Prerequisite: 281.Offered spring.4 credits

AAVC-390  PORTFOLIO I

Portfolio development in any medium or combination of media. Emphasis on critical development, studio practices, visual, oral and written coherence toward a unified body of work. Students seeking entrance must present a portfolio in advance to a panel of art professors.
$25 lab fee each semester.
Prerequisites: 100, 101, 110 and 120 plus at least two 200-level studios and one 300-level intermediate studio, which may be taken concurrently. Offered fall, spring. 4 credits (2 per semester).

AAVC-391  PORTFOLIO II

Portfolio development in any medium or combination of media. Emphasis on critical development, studio practices, visual, oral and written coherence toward a unified body of work. Students seeking entrance must present a portfolio in advance to a panel of art professors.
$25 lab fee each semester.
Prerequisites: 100, 101, 110 and 120 plus at least two 200-level studios, and one 300-level intermediate studio which may be taken concurrently. Offered fall and spring. 4 credits (2 per semester)

AAVC-395  GALLERY MANAGEMENT AND CURATORIAL PRACTICES

Introduction to the standard concepts and techniques of business gallery management and curatorial practices which include: curating and mounting exhibitions, coordinating press, working with artists and serving as a docent. May be repeated once for credit.
$25 lab fee.
Prerequisite: 100 or consent of instructor. Offered spring. 2 credits

AAVC-439  PEER INSTRUCTION

Advanced study opportunity for outstanding students to assist faculty members in the classroom or studio. Focus on course content and pedagogy. May not be repeated for credit.
Prerequisite: Application and consent of instructor. 3 credits. (Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory) (EL)

AAVC-480  INDEPENDENT STUDY

Program of directed tutorial reading or studio project relating to the special interests of the student and supervised by a department faculty member.
Prerequisites: 100 or 101 and consent of instructor. 1-5 credits. Lab fee adjusted to credit load.

AAVC-487  ART INTERNSHIP

Supervised work at an agency, gallery, or other establishment using technical or organizational skills related to the visual arts.
Prerequisite: department consent. 1-5 credits. (EL)

AAVC-490  THESIS I

Elective integrative seminar for majors planning post-graduate work in studio art. Students produce a cohesive body of work and related critical papers and artist statements. Gallery practice assisting the director.
$25 lab fee each semester.
Prerequisites: 390 and 391, consent of instructor plus 242 and one additional visual culture course. Offered fall, spring. 2 credits each semester.

AAVC-491  THESIS II

Elective integrative seminar for majors planning post-graduate work in studio art. Students produce a cohesive body of work and related critical papers and artist statements. Gallery practice assisting the director.
$25 lab fee each semester.
Prerequisites: 390 and 391, consent of instructor, plus 242 and one additional visual culture course. Offered fall and spring. 2 credits each semester.

Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

BCMB-486  SENIOR CAPSTONE

Senior capstone course emphasizing breadth of knowledge in foundational biology and chemistry and depth of knowledge in integrated biochemistry course work. Coursework may include discussions of primary literature, oral presentations, and written and oral exams.
Prerequisite: senior standing.1 credit.

Biology

BIOL-100  TOPICS IN BIOLOGY

Specialized focus on new developments or subjects of current interest in biology. 3 credits. Not applicable to General Science major. (NW)

BIOL-104  GENETICS: A 20TH CENTURY SCIENCE

Examination of the changing concept of the gene from 1900 to the present. The advent and the future of molecular biology. Consideration of topics from historical and biological perspectives. Study of the scientific method and its application to the gene concept. 3 credits. Not applicable to General Science major. (NW)

BIOL-105  HUMAN BIOLOGY AND EVOLUTION (CROSS- LISTED WITH ANTH 105)

Principles of human Biology and evolution, dealing with the genetics, physiology, and behavior of humans and other primates. Study of the relationships between biology and culture. Emphasis on the theory of evolution, its application to humans, and recent discoveries in the field of human prehistory. Lecture, readings, films, essays, and discussion. 3 credits. Not applicable to General Science major. (NW)

BIOL-106  MICROBES AND MAN

Role of microorganisms in nature and their importance to human welfare. Stimulation of an understanding of such contemporary issues as genetic engineering, cancer and its causes, infectious diseases, and the quality of the environment. For the non-science major; assumes no biology or chemistry. 3 credits. Not applicable to General Science major.

BIOL-107  ANIMALS IN ACTION

Course explores animal behavior at multiple levels of biological organization from genetic and neurophysiological underpinnings of behavior to resulting behavioral interactions of animals with environment and other organisms. Special emphasis given to relating course concepts to relevant current topics in human health and society, evolution, and biological conservation. Topics include: behavioral genetics, hormones and behavior, mating behavior, parent-offspring interactions, habitat selection, navigation, foraging, self defense, communication, learning, cognition, sociality, and behavior and conservation. Course for non-majors intended to promote scientific literacy and quantitative reasoning. 3 credits. Not applicable to General Science major. (NW)

BIOL-108  ECOLOGY OF ECOSYSTEMS

Examination of the diversity and complexity of ecosystems plus critical processes, including nutrient cycling, productivity, and energy flow. Analysis of human impacts on these ecosystems, with considerations of ecosystem resilience and restoration efforts. 3 credits. Not applicable to General Science major. (NW or QR)

BIOL-109  THE LIFE AND DEATH OF CANCER

Introduction to basic Biology and pathogenesis of cancer. Overview of many types of cancer with description of statistics regarding prevalence and survival rates. Consideration of economic and social implications of cancer, treatments, and research and drug development. Designed for non-majors. 3 credits. Not applicable to General Science major. (NW)

BIOL-212  HUMAN ANATOMY

A systemic approach to structure and basic functions of cells, tissues, and organs of the human body. Lab exercises include cat dissection, microscopic examination of tissues and organs of the body and utilization of human cadaver prosections. Lecture and laboratory.
$60 lab fee.
Prerequisites: Completion of one full semester of college. One year of Principles of Biology or General Chemistry is strongly recommended. Acceptable for general science major. 4 credits. (NW)

BIOL-213  HUMAN PHYSIOLOGY

Functioning of human body systems relating to organization and structure; support and movement; internal communication; integration, coordination, and sensation; internal transport; energy acquisition and metabolism; fluid regulation; and reproduction. Lecture and laboratory.
$60 lab fee.
Prerequisite: 212 or consent of instructor. Offered fall and spring. Acceptable for General Science major. 4 credits. (NW)

BIOL-220  RESEARCH METHODS

Instruction and practice in techniques used in research laboratories. May be repeated for Biology major or minor elective credit.
Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 1 credit. (EL)

BIOL-235  FIELD METHODS IN BIOLOGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

A hands-on exploration of the methods used to gather and analyze data taken from the field, including quantification of the diversity and distribution of plant, animal, and fungal species, populations, communities, and ecosystems, of hydrology and water quality, and of GIS software. Lecture, laboratory, and field trips.
$60 fee.
Prerequisites: 211, MATH 140 recommended. 4 credits.

BIOL-250  PLANT GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT

Study of the basic structure and function of the cells, tissues, and organs of higher plants. Detailed exploration of the genetic and molecular bases of processes such as flowering and embryogenesis. Emphasis on current models of plant development using scientific papers from the primary literature. Lecture and laboratory.
$60 lab fee.
Prerequisite: 211. 5 credits.

BIOL-260  PLANT DIVERSITY AND ECOLOGY

Study of the evolution and systematics of plants, including mosses, ferns and fern allies, gymnosperms, and angiosperms; the global and regional distribution and ecology of plant communities and ecosystems; and the interrelationships between plants and humans.
$60 lab fee.
Prerequisites: 211 or ENVS 201, 203. 4 credits. (NW)

BIOL-270  GENETICS

Fundamental principles of heredity from viruses to man, with emphasis on chromosomal mapping, gene regulation, and modern concepts of DNA manipulation. Lecture and laboratory.
$60 lab fee.
Prerequisites: 211, CHEM 210. 5 credits.

BIOL-275  INTRODUCTION TO MICROBIOLOGY

Introductory course covering the basic concepts of microbial world, beginning with a review of biological and chemical concepts. Focus on the prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms with clinical and industrial importance. Meets the prerequisites for students planning to major in Nursing.
$60 lab fee.
Prerequisite: 211 or CHEM 211. 4 credits.

BIOL-280  MARINE ECOLOGY

The physical and biological factors in the marine ecosystem and their interrelationships, emphasizing the rocky intertidal, sandy beach, and deep abyss environments. Lecture, laboratory, field work, and projects.
$60 lab fee.
Prerequisites: 211, CHEM 211 recommended. 4 credits.

BIOL-285  PRINCIPLES OF ECOLOGY

Introduction to structure and functions of ecosystems, communities, and populations with emphasis on terrestrial and fresh water environments. Introduction to science of laboratory ecology and field research. Quantitative field techniques, basic statistical tools, and independent research study.
$60 lab fee.
Prerequisite: 211 or ENVS 201. 5 credits. (NW or QR)

BIOL-290  PLANTS AND SOCIETY (CROSS-LISTED WITH ANTH 290)

An interdisciplinary study of past, present and future uses of plants, the products made from them, the sociocultural contexts in which the plants are used, their impact on the development of human societies, and the impact of humans on plant populations worldwide. Three hours of lecture per week plus field trips.
$60 lab fee.
Prerequisites: 211, ANTH 111, or ENVS 203. Offered fall of even years. 4 credits. (NW)

BIOL-295  SOPHOMORE SEMINAR IN BIOLOGY

Career planning and skills in biology. Career guidance, networking, ethics, problem solving, scientific exploration, resume and/or CV writing, informational interviews, attendance at and summary of several Science Colloquium meetings, and class presentations.
Prerequisite: sophomore standing. (Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory) 1 credit

BIOL-300  TOPICS IN BIOLOGY

Specialized focus on new developments, advanced topics, or subjects of current interest in biology. Lecture/lab, lecture/field work, or seminar format. May be repeated once for credit with different content.
$60 lab fee.
Prerequisites: 211 and junior standing. 3 credits.

BIOL-330  INSECT BIOLOGY

Explore the evolution, diversity, anatomy, physiology, reproduction, development, ecology, and behavior of the most abundant animal form on planet earth the insects. Class meetings will be a mixture of traditional lecture with frequent in-class discussions and activities. The laboratory will include experimental and experiential investigations of material coordinated with the lecture. Students assemble and curate an insect collection.
$60 lab fee.
Prerequisites: 211 and junior standing, or consent of instructor. 4 credits.

BIOL-350  BIOLOGY AND IDENTITY OF WOODY PLANTS

Intensive field and lecture course for identification of tree, shrub, and vine species prominent in Oregon ecosystems. Biogeographic history, landscape and disturbance ecology, ecological specialization, evolutionary history, and impacts of global warming and other anthropogenic environmental changes. Lab trip to the Redwoods.
$60 fee.
Prerequisite: 211. Offered fall of odd-numbered years. 4 credits.

BIOL-361  GENERAL MICROBIOLOGY

Biology of major groups of microorganisms withemphasis on bacteria and viruses. Microorganismsin human disease, the environment, and appliedmicrobiology. Lab techniques for isolating andidentifying bacteria. Three lectures and onelaboratory per week.
$60 lab fee. Appropriate forBiology & Exercise Science majors.
Prerequisites: 211 and CHEM 210.4 credits

BIOL-385  PLANT SYSTEMATICS

Evolutionary perspective of diversity and adaptations of vascular plants. Special emphasis given to vascular plant classifications, recognition of family-level traits, and plant nomenclature. Collection and identification of ferns, gymnosperms, and flowering plants in Oregon. Lecture, lab, and field trips.
$60 lab fee.
Prerequisites: 211 and junior standing. 270 strongly recommended. Offered spring of odd-numbered years. 5 credits.

BIOL-390  VERTEBRATE PHYSIOLOGY

Physiological principles in vertebrates, with emphasis on mechanisms of integration and homeostasis at cellular, organ, and system levels. Lecture and laboratory.
$60 lab fee.
Prerequisites: 211, CHEM 211. 5 credits.

BIOL-395  JUNIOR SEMINAR: TOPICS IN BIOLOGICAL LITERATURE

Detailed investigation of selected topics in the biological literature via discussion and critique of current research papers. Student oral presentation.
Prerequisites: 211 and junior standing. Offered spring semester. 1 credit.

BIOL-400  MOLECULAR CELL BIOLOGY

Study of the molecular mechanisms of fundamental biological processes such as transcription, translation, and DNA replication; molecular cell biology of eukaryotic organisms. Concepts introduced at the beginning of the course applied to the molecular biology of complex multicellular processes such as development, immune response, and cancer.
$60 lab fee.
Prerequisites: 211, CHEM 211 and junior standing. 5 credits. (MWI)

BIOL-410  ANIMAL BEHAVIOR

Concepts in animal behavior at multiple levels of biological organization. Perspectives range from genetic and neurophysiological underpinnings of behavior to resulting behavioral interactions of animals with their environment and other organisms. Topics include behavioral genetics, hormones and behavior, mating behavior, parent-offspring interactions, habitat selection, navigation, foraging, self defense, communication, learning, sociality, and behavior and conservation. Laboratory includes experimental hypothesis testing in field and lab; data collection, analysis, and presentation; and grant proposal.
$60 lab fee.
Prerequisites: 211 and junior standing. 4 credits. (MWI)

BIOL-420  DEVELOPMENTAL BIOLOGY

Study of the early development of vertebrates and selected invertebrates, with emphasis on genetic, biochemical, and physiological processes influencing formation and growth of organ systems. Lecture and laboratory.
$60 lab fee.
Prerequisites: 211, CHEM 211. BIOL 270 strongly recommended. 5 credits.

BIOL-432  IMMUNOLOGY

The nature of antigens, lymphocytes, immunoglobulins, and the regulation of the immune response. Applications to infection, hypersensitivity, tumor immunity, transplantation, and autoimmunity. Three lectures per week.
Prerequisites: 211, CHEM 211, 321. 3 credits.

BIOL-433  IMMUNOLOGY LAB

Laboratory techniques in basic hematology, serology, cell culture, and experimental immunology.
$60 lab fee.
Prerequisite: 432 concurrent. 1 credit.

BIOL-439  PEER INSTRUCTION

Advanced study opportunity for outstanding students to assist faculty members in the classroom or laboratory. Focus on course content and pedagogy.
Prerequisites: junior standing; application and consent of instructor. 1-2 credits. (Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory) (EL)

BIOL-441  BIOCHEMISTRY AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY

Study of the biochemical and molecular processes within a cell. Consideration of the role of lipids, amino acids, carbohydrates, and nucleic acids in the fundamental cellular processes of replication, transcription, translation, signaling, and transport.
$60 lab fee.
Prerequisites: 211, CHEM 211, and junior standing. 4 credits.

BIOL-450  EVOLUTION

Historical development of modern synthetic theory; sources and maintenance of variation, population differentiation, origin of species; applications to conservation and human welfare. Lecture and field trips.
$60 lab fee.
Prerequisites: 211 and junior standing. 270 strongly recommended. 5 credits. (MWI)

BIOL-480  INDEPENDENT STUDY

Supplemental work for students with advanced standing in biology. 1-5 credits, with a maximum of 5 credits applied to the major.

BIOL-485  SEMINAR

Group study and discussion of contemporary problems, research issues, and ideas in biology. Oral presentation.
Prerequisite: one year of college biology. 1 credit.

BIOL-486  SENIOR COMPREHENSIVE EXAM

Preparation for oral examination emphasizing breadth of knowledge in general Biology and depth of knowledge in areas of course work.
Prerequisite: senior standing. 1 credit.

BIOL-487  INTERNSHIP

Opportunity to gain practical experiences, e.g. at a field station, with a health care professional, in a business, or with a governmental agency. Written report. One credit per 40 hours of experience.
Prerequisite: consent of department. Maximum 5 credits may be applied to the major. (EL)

BIOL-490  INDEPENDENT RESEARCH

Field or laboratory research on topics of interest to student. Library work and extensive written report. For advanced, self-reliant students.
Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 2-5 credits. Maximum 5 credits applied to the major.

Business

BUSN-041  PERSONAL FINANCE

Techniques for managing personal financial affairs. Personal budgeting, taxes, credit, bank services, life and health insurances, social security and retirement annuities, property and liability insurances, residential real estate, stock and bond markets, and estate planning and settlement. Not applicable toward a major. 1 credit. (EL)

BUSN-098  SENIOR TUTORING

Service as tutors and reviewsession leaders for introductory courses and other projects by senior students with sufficient course backgrounds and superior academic achievements.
Prerequisites: 3.00 GPA overall, 3.50 GPA in major, and selection by the department chair. 1 credit. (EL)

BUSN-141  BUSINESS TOPICS

Special topics in business. Course credit may not be applied to a business major. 2-4 credits.

BUSN-250  CONTEMPORARY BUSINESS

American business in contemporary society. Business environments, management, production, marketing, accounting, and finance. Not open to students with 8 or more credits in BUSN courses. 4 credits.

BUSN-350  THE MANAGEMENT OF SPORT

Marketing, financial, legal, and ethical principles for field of sport management.
$10 fee.
Prerequisites: 250. Offered fall. 4 credits.

BUSN-439  PEER INSTRUCTION

Advanced opportunity for outstanding students to assist faculty members in the classroom or laboratory. Focus on course content and pedagogy.
Prerequisites: senior standing, application and consent of instructor. 1-4 credits. (Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory) (EL)

BUSN-441  FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS

Financial intermediaries, the money and capital markets, determination of interest rates, bank asset/liability management, non bank financial institutions, and the regulation of financial markets.
Prerequisite: 341. Offered spring. 4 credits.

BUSN-444  FINANCIAL THEORY

Financial theory using case problem-solving and spreadsheet modeling to: assess and manage risk; value stocks and bonds; forecast financial need; to make decisions regarding long term asset acquisition and financing; and to evaluate dividend policy.
Prerequisite: 341. Offered fall. 4 credits.

BUSN-452  PRINCIPLES OF REAL ESTATE

Social and economic impact of real estate and real estate markets; property rights and contract law; property taxes, property insurance, financial real estate, brokerage operation, appraisal and zoning, and building codes.
Prerequisites: ECON 210, MATH 140, 160. 3 credits.

BUSN-456  INSURANCE AND RISK

Insurance institutions, life and health insurance, property and liability insurance, and government regulation of the insurance industry.
Prerequisites: ECON 210, MATH 140, 160. 3 credits.

BUSN-463  TAXES FOR BUSINESS & INVESTMENT PLANNING

The federal income tax system and its impact on management in the decision-making environment.
Prerequisites: 261, ECON 210, MATH 140, 160. 3 credits.

BUSN-467  ACCOUNTING TOPICS

Special problems in accounting, including foreign operations, segmental and interim reporting, insolvency, partnerships, and not-for-profit entities. May be repeated for credit with different content and approval of the instructor and faculty advisor.
Prerequisite: varies by topic. 3 credits.

BUSN-480  INDEPENDENT STUDY

Advanced study in a particular topic of business chosen by the student and supervised by a departmental teacher. Repeatable as long as the subject matter is different.
Prerequisites: cumulative GPA of at least 2.75 and approval of both the supervising instructor and the department chair. 1-5 credits.

BUSN-482  TOPICS IN FINANCE

Selected topics in finance using small group discussion. Open to advanced students. May be repeated with consent of instructor when the finance topic is substantially different.
Prerequisites: 341 and consent of instructor. Offered yearly. 2-5 credits.

BUSN-485  SEMINAR

Selected topics using small group discussion. Student participation. Open to advanced students. May be repeated for credit with a different topic.
Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 2-5 credits.

BUSN-490  RESEARCH

Individual research, reading, and study in field of accounting, business, or finance under the guidance of a faculty member. Open to advanced students.
Prerequisites: approval of the supervising instructor and the department chair. 2-5 credits.

BUSN-491  THESIS

Written report of research or study on a problem in the student's major field. To be completed during the final year before graduation.
Prerequisites: approval of the supervising instructor and the department chair. 3-5 credits.

Chemistry

CHEM-035  RESEARCH PARTICIPATION

Participation in the department research programs. Open to interested sophomores and juniors.
Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 1-2 credits.

CHEM-050  RESEARCH METHODS IN CHEMISTRY

Introduction to computer based research methods in chemistry. Use of spreadsheets, symbolic mathematics, and techniques for searching chemistry databases.
Prerequisite: consent of instructor. May be repeated once. 1 credit.

CHEM-100  CONCEPTS IN CHEMISTRY

Basic concepts of chemistry including the periodic table; chemical bonding; nomenclature; molecular geometry; simple qualitative aspects of energy, thermodynamics and kinetics; and the relation between chemical structure and reactivity. Concepts covered using one common theme, such as nutrition, atmospheric sciences, environmental sciences, or an-other topic of faculty and student interest. Not for General Science majors.
Prerequisite: MATH 105 or equivalent, or consent of instructor. Offered January term. 3 credits. (NW)

CHEM-120  CHEMISTRY IN THE ATMOSPHERE

Basic concepts of chemistry in the atmosphere including the periodic table, chemical reactivity, and spectroscopy, with particular emphasis on the study of pollution, the formation of the ozone hole, global warming, and the relationship between human activity and atmospheric chemistry. Not applicable to Chemistry major or minor. Not for General Science majors.
Prerequisite: MATH 105 or equivalent, or consent of instructor. Offered spring. 4 credits. (NW)

CHEM-170  INTRODUCTORY TOPICS IN CHEMISTRY

Exploration of how chemistry applies to professional activity in areas relevant to course title focus. Descriptive introductions to basic chemistry concepts essential to understanding each area, leading to applications of this knowledge to historical and/or hypothetical situations. Not for chemistry majors.
Prerequisite: MATH 105 or equivalent. Offered fall or spring. 4 credits. (NW)

CHEM-210  GENERAL CHEMISTRY

Principles of chemistry, including stoichiometry; gases, liquids, and solids; atomic and molecular structures; solutions; equilibrium; thermodynamics and reaction kinetics; properties of selected elements, including introduction to transition metals. Quantitative and inorganic qualitative analysis in the lab. Lecture, lab.
$60 lab fee per semester.
Prerequisites: MATH 150 completed or concurrent. (For 211: 210 or equivalent with grade of C- or better.) 210 offered fall; 211 offered spring. 4 credits each semester. (NW)

CHEM-211  GENERAL CHEMISTRY

Principles of chemistry, including stoichiometry; gases, liquids, and solids; atomic and molecular structures; solutions; equilibrium; thermodynamics and reaction kinetics; properties of selected elements, including introduction to transition metals. Quantitative and inorganic qualitative analysis in the lab. Lecture, lab.
$60 lab fee per semester.
Prerequisites: MATH 150 completed or concurrent. (For 211: 210 or equivalent with grade of C- or better.) 210 offered fall; 211 offered spring. 4 credits each semester. (NW)

CHEM-285  SEMINAR

Group study and discussions about current topics in chemistry. Current research and development, interaction of chemistry with other disciplines. Repeatable four times.
Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Offered fall, spring. 1 credit.

CHEM-300  THE ART AND SCIENCE OF BREWING

Academic approach to the production and critique of brewed beverages. Malting, brewing, fermentation and bottling/kegging. Historical development of brewing science. Human health aspects related to brewing and the consumption of fermented beverages.
$50 lab fee.
Prerequisites: Completion of a lower division NW, MATH 105 or equivalent, plus 21 years of age or older by the first day of class. Application and interview required. Offered January term of evennumbered years. 4 credits (NW)

CHEM-321  ORGANIC CHEMISTRY

The chemistry of carbon, including preparation, properties, and reactions of important classes of aliphatic and aromatic compounds. Emphasis on reaction mechanisms, synthesis, and analysis. Lecture/discussion, lab.
$40 lab fee,
$10 voluntary fee per semester.
Prerequisites: For 321: 211 with a grade of C or better. For 322: 321 with a grade of C or better. Offered fall, spring. 4 credits each semester.

CHEM-321D  ORGANIC CHEMISTRY DISCUSSION

CHEM-322  ORGANIC CHEMISTRY

The chemistry of carbon, including preparation, properties, and reactions of important classes of aliphatic and aromatic compounds. Emphasis on reaction mechanisms, synthesis, and analysis. Lecture/discussion, lab.
$40 lab fee,
$10 voluntary fee per semester.
Prerequisites: For 321: 211 with a grade of C or better. For 322: 321 with a grade of C or better. Offered fall, spring. 4 credits each semester.

CHEM-322D  ORGANIC CHEMISTRY DISCUSSION

CHEM-330  WRITING IN CHEMITRY

Introduction to the genres of scientific writing, emphasizing writing and library skills in scientific research. Completion of a collaborative research project prior to enrollment in CHEM 330 is encouraged.
Prerequisite: 322 or consent of instructor. Offered fall. 4 credits. (MWI)

CHEM-335  QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS

Principles of analytical chemistry, emphasizing applications of equilibrium. Three hours of lecture, three hours of lab and discussion.
$50 lab fee.
Prerequisite: 211 with a grade of C or better. Offered January term. 4 credits.

CHEM-340  INSTRUMENTAL METHODS OF ANALYSIS

Introduction to the theory and principles of instrumental methods of chemical analysis. Emphasis on spectrophotometry, electrochemistry, chromatography and electronics. Lecture, discussion, lab.
$50 lab fee.

CHEM-350  INORGANIC CHEMISTRY I

Periodic properties of elements, including descriptive chemistry of the main group elements and coordination compounds of the transition metals. Emphasis on basic chemical bonding in molecules, an introduction to symmetry with term symbols, and acid/base reactions. Lecture/ discussion.
Prerequisite: 211 or equivalent. Offered fall. 4 credits.

CHEM-351  INORGANIC CHEMISTRY II

Presentation of theoretical and descriptive material on inorganic chemical compounds, synthetic and reaction strategies for important transformations including structures and bonding models, inorganic reaction mechanisms, transition metal chemistry, electron deficient compounds, organometallic compounds, and the main group elements. Laboratory experiments illustrate common synthetic and characterization processes for inorganic compounds. Lecture/discussion/lab.
Prerequisite: 350 or equivalent. Offered spring. 4 credits.

CHEM-361  PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY I

Chemical thermodynamics, kinetics and molecular spectroscopy. Applications including thermochemistry and calorimetry; bulk properties of pure substances; methods of describing the properties of solutions; reaction rates; mechanisms of chemical reactions; transition state theory; spectroscopic determination of molecular structure. Lecture/lab.
Prerequisites: 211 or equivalent; PHYS 211 (may be taken concurrently); MATH 175; or consent of instructor. Recommended: MATH 200. Offered fall. 4 credits.

CHEM-362  PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY II

The quantum mechanical description of matter with emphasis on atomic structure and chemical bonding. Introduction to statistical mechanics. Four hours of lecture.
Prerequisites: 361 or equivalent; MATH 175; PHYS 211; or consent of instructor. Recommended: MATH 200, 210. Offered spring. 4 credits.

CHEM-370  ADVANCED TOPICS IN CHEMISTRY

Selected advanced chemistry topics not regularly offered at Linfield.
Prerequisite: 321 or consent of instructor. Offered fall. 4 credits.

CHEM-381  RESEARCH IN MOLECULAR AND ADVANCED MATERIALS

Collaborative research experience in molecular and advanced materials. Discussion of current readings, experience with research methodology, experimental design, data collection and analysis. May be repeated twice.
Prerequisite: 210 or consent of instructor. Offered spring. 1-3 credits.

CHEM-382  RESEARCH IN BASIC AND APPLIED NANOTECHNOLOGY

Introduction to basic and applied research in nanotechnology. Weekly meetings include seminars, discussions of research methods, review of current scientific research, experimental design, and ethical issues in chemistry. Each student prepares independent research proposal and oral presentation, and carries out research. May be repeated twice.
Prerequisite: 210 or consent of instructor. Offered spring. 1-3 credits.

CHEM-383  RESEARCH IN BASIC AND APPLIED QUANTUM CHEMISTRY

Introduction to basic and applied research in quantum chemistry. Weekly meetings include seminars, discussions of research methods, review of current scientific research, experimental design, and ethical issues in chemistry. Each student prepares independent research proposal and oral presentation, and carries out research. May be repeated twice.
Prerequisite: 210 or consent of instructor. Offered spring. 1-3 credits.

CHEM-440  BIOCHEMISTRY

Chemical and physical properties of substances of biological origin and their interactions in living systems. Relationships among various metabolic pathways and how molecular traffic along these pathways is regulated. Recommended for pre-professional students. Lecture/discussion, lab.
$60 lab fee.
Prerequisite: 322 or equivalent. Offered fall. 4 credits.

Computer Science

COMP-121  INTRODUCTION TO THE INTERNET AND WORLD WIDE WEB

Introduction to the internet through the World Wide Web. Emphasis on the social and cultural implications of the emerging information and communication technologies. Techniques of web-page creation.
$30 lab fee. Offered fall. 4 credits.

COMP-131  COMPUTERS IN MODERN SOCIETY

Impact of computers on present and future society. Benefits and problems of computer technology. History of computing and computers. Ethical and legal basis for privacy protection; technological strategies for privacy protection; freedom of expression in cyberspace; international and intercultural implications. Information security and crime. Social, ethical, political and technological implications and effects of computers in the modern world.
$30 lab fee. Offered spring. 4 credits. (IS)

COMP-160  INTRODUCTION TO PROGRAMMING: FUNCTIONS

Introduces the basic concepts of programming: reading and writing unambiguous descriptions of sequential processes. Emphasizes introductory algorithmic strategies and corresponding structures.
$30 lab fee.
Prerequisite: MATH 105 or equivalent. Offered fall. 3 credits. (QR)

COMP-161  BEGINNING PROGRAMMING: OBJECTS

Extends the introduction of programming begun in COMP 160 to include object-oriented programming and basic data structures - linked lists, stacks and queues - and related algorithms.
$30 lab fee.
Prerequisites: 160 and MATH 150 or consent of instructor. Offered spring. 3 credits. (QR)

COMP-260  DATABASE MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS

Information systems design and implementation within a database management system environment. Topics include conceptual, logical, and physical data models and modeling tools; mapping conceptual schema to relational schema, entity and referential integrity, relational algebra and relational calculus. Database query languages (Structured Query Language (SQL)). Relational database design, transaction processing, and physical database design (storage and file structures). Database implementation, including user interface and reports.
$30 lab fee.
Prerequisite: 160 or 152. Offered fall. 3 credits

COMP-262  INTERMEDIATE PROGRAMMING: DATA ABSTRACTIONS

Adds data abstraction, intermediate data types and related algorithms to the beginning programming techniques learned in COMP 161.
$30 lab fee.
Prerequisites: 161 and MATH 230 completed or concurrent. Offered fall. 3 credits.

COMP-263  INTERMEDIATE PROGRAMMING: ALGORITHM DESIGN AND ANALYSIS

Adds the concept and related tools of asymptotic complexity bounds to the foundational techniques developed in MATH 230. Applies these tools to the design and analysis of intermediate level algorithms with an aim toward efficiency.
$30 lab fee.
Prerequisites: 262 and MATH 230. Offered spring. 3 credits.

COMP-305  SOFTWARE ENGINEERING

Analysis, design, implementation, and testing of a medium-scale software system as a member of a project team. Significant real-world group projects covering all the phases of software development life cycle using high-level automated analysis and design tools. Experience with other important skills such as fact-finding, communications, and project management.
$30 lab fee.
Prerequisite: 260. Offered spring. 3 credits. (MWI)

COMP-330  OPERATING SYSTEMS AND NETWORKING

Operating systems design and implementation. Topics include overview of components of an operating system, mutual exclusion and synchronization, implementation of processes, scheduling algorithms, memory management, and file systems. Net-centric computing, network architectures; issues associated with distributed computing.
$30 lab fee.
Prerequisite: 161. Offered fall of even-numbered years. 3 credits.

COMP-370  ADVANCED TOPICS IN ALGORITHMS, COMPLEXITY AND INTELLIGENT SYSTEMS

Topics may include: distributed algorithms, complexity classes P and NP, automata theory, algorithmic analysis, cryptographic, geometric or parallel algorithms, compression and decompression, search and constraint satisfaction, knowledge representation and reasoning, agents, natural language processing, machine learning and neural networks, artificial intelligence planning systems and robotics.
$30 lab fee.
Prerequisite: 263. Offered fall. 3 credits.

COMP-375  COMPUTER GRAPHICS AND ANIMATION

Fundamental principles and techniques of interactive 3D computer graphics implemented through an industry standard application programming interface (API) such as OpenGL. Extensive hands-on experience based on lab projects requiring programming.
$30 lab fee.
Prerequisite: 161. Offered spring of odd-numbered years. 3 credits.

COMP-377  COMPUTER ARCHITECTURE

Concepts of the fundamental logical organization of a computer (its parts and their relationship) and how it actually works; exposure to a central processor's native language, and to system concepts. Topics in computer hardware, architectures, and digital logic.
$30 lab fee.
Prerequisite: 161. Offered spring of even-numbered years. 3 credits.

COMP-480  INDEPENDENT STUDY

Program of directed tutorial reading on some topic or problem within the discipline relating to the special interests of the student and supervised by a departmental faculty member.
$30 lab fee. 1-3 credits.

COMP-485  ADVANCED TOPICS IN COMPUTER SCIENCE

Topics of current interest in computer science. May include: advanced software engineering, human computer interaction, advanced networking and systems administration, advanced database systems, computer animation and simulation, finite automata and languages, and intelligent systems.
$30 lab fee.
Prerequisite: varies with topic. Offered spring. 3 credits.

COMP-487  SOFTWARE ENGINEERING INTERNSHIP

Practical on-site work experience in a computer-intensive operation with academic oversight. Experience with a variety of programming languages, operating systems, applications, and machines.
Prerequisite: 20 credits in Computer Science. 1-3 credits.

COMP-490  CAPSTONE PROJECT

Research or software application development on some topic or problem within the discipline relating to the special interests of the student.
$30 lab fee. Offered fall. 4 credits.

Economics

ECON-271  ECONOMICS OF STAR TREK

Application of economic concepts to issues raised by the Star Trek television series and motion pictures. Economic problems of population, environmental degradation, discrimination (race, gender, sexual orientation), aging and death, animal rights, genetic engineering, and the impact of technology. Not applicable for Economics major or minor. Offered January term. 4 credits. (IS or US)

ECON-321  ECONOMICS OF SPORTS

Application of economic analysis to professional and amateur sports. Analysis of industry market structures and labor markets, including the role of discrimination. Public policy issues such as Title IX and stadium financing.
$40 fee.
Prerequisite: 210. Offered spring. 4 credits. (IS or US)

ECON-322  ECONOMICS OF COLLEGE SPORTS

Application of economics analysis to intercollegiate sports. Analysis of the NCAA as a cartel and the labor market for college coaches. Role of the media in the commercialization of college sports. Issues of discrimination and Title IX. Public policy questions such as paying college athletes and reforms to improve balance between academics and athletics.
$40 fee.
Prerequisite: 210. Offered spring. 4 credits (IS or US)

ECON-331  INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS

Study of international trade theory and policy. Causes and consequences of international trade, commodity composition of trade, tariff and non-tariff barriers to trade, regional and multilateral trade agreements.
Prerequisite: 210. 4 credits.

ECON-332  DEVELOPMENT ECONOMICS

Analysis of the theory and history of growth processes in lower income economies.
Prerequisite: 210. 4 credits. (GP)

ECON-333  INTERNATIONAL MONETARY ECONOMICS

Study of international monetary theory and policy, balance of payments and exchange rate determination and adjustment, exchange rate systems, macroeconomic policy in the open economy, and selected international banking issues.
Prerequisite: 210. Offered spring. 4 credits

ECON-351  PUBLIC SECTOR ECONOMICS

Taxing and spending activities of government and their effects on the allocation of resources. Efficiency of government economic policy decision making processes.
Prerequisite: 210. 4 credits.

ECON-352  ECONOMICS OF THE LAW

Application of economic analysis to traditional areas of legal study, such as contracts, property, torts, and criminal law. Use of a "rational choice" framework to analyze the purpose, effect, and genesis of laws. The effect of legal structures on economic efficiency.
Prerequisite: 210. 4 credits.

ECON-361  TOPICS IN ECONOMIC HISTORY

Changes in economics structure and performance over time. Causes of economic change and the impact on society, including marginalized groups. May be repeated for credit under different topics.
Prerequisite: 210. 4 credits (VP or US)

ECON-411  INTERMEDIATE MICROECONOMICS

Marginal utility, market demand, elasticities, production and cost, product pricing and output, market structure, pricing and employment of resources, income distribution, general equilibrium, and welfare economics.
Prerequisites: 210, MATH 140 or 340, and 160 or 170. Offered spring. 4 credits.

ECON-412  INTERMEDIATE MACROECONOMICS

National income accounting, consumption theories, investment theories, balance of foreign payments, business fluctuations, economic growth, fiscal theory and policies, and monetary theories and policies.
Prerequisites: 210, MATH 140 or 340, and 160 or 170. Offered fall. 4 credits. (QR)

ECON-416  ECONOMETRICS

Application of economic theory, mathematics, and statistical inference in the formulation and testing of economic hypotheses. Development of skills associated with generating, interpreting, and reporting results of empirical research in economics.
$10 fee.
Prerequisites: 411, 412. Offered fall. 4 credits. (QR)

ECON-417  SENIOR SEMINAR IN ECONOMICS

Selected topics in economics using small group discussion. Student participation, daily writing assignments, and a semester research project. Open to senior majors or minors in economics.
$10 fee.
Prerequisites: 411, 412, 416. Offered spring. 4 credits. (MWI)

ECON-439  PEER INSTRUCTION

Advanced study opportunity for outstanding students to assist faculty members in the classroom or laboratory. Focus on course content and pedagogy.
Prerequisites: Application and consent of instructor. 1-4 credits. (Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory) (EL)

ECON-461  HISTORY OF ECONOMIC THOUGHT

Evolution of ideas about economic matters and methodology from antiquity to the present. Evolution of "Economic Man." Pre- or corequisite: 411 or 412. 4 credits. (UQ or VP)

ECON-480  INDEPENDENT STUDY

Advanced study in a particular topic in economics chosen by the student in consultation with a supervising departmental faculty member.
Prerequisites: GPA of at least 2.75, and approval of advisor and department chair. 1-4 credits.

ECON-487  INTERNSHIP

Applied economics learning experience in a public or private sector organization.
Prerequisites: GPA of at least 3.00, completion of at least 20 credits in ECON courses including 411and 412, and approval of advisor and departmental chair. 1-4 credits. (EL)

ECON-490  ECONOMICS RESEARCH

Individual research, reading, and study in economics under the supervision of a departmental faculty member.
Prerequisites: approval of supervising faculty member and departmental chair. 1-4 credits.

Education

EDUC-040  COMMUNITY SERVICE

Involvement in some educational service activity in the community. Acceptable activities include tutoring and assisting in public and private schools, youth recreational programs, community day-care facilities or other approved educational service. Requires 30 clock hours of service. Offered fall, January term, spring. 1-2 credits.

Students taking education courses must pass an approved criminal background investigation in order to meet course requirements as a requirement for working with children in a school setting.

EDUC-150  FOUNDATIONS OF EDUCATION

An introduction to public schools and the teaching profession, including control of curriculum, the history of American education, philosophies which have influenced educators, how schools are financed, and laws which govern teachers and students. Requires 30 clock hours of field experience in a public school classroom. Students taking this course must successfully complete a criminal background check. 3 credits.

EDUC-205  TECHNOLOGY APPLICATIONS IN EDUCATION

Introduces pre-service teachers to a teaching design under which technology (computer hardware, software, and ancillary equipment) is used to help change how teachers teach and students learn. Students will learn basic computer and multimedia equipment operation, techniques of multimedia authoring and how to use the Internet effectively in teaching across the curriculum.
Prerequisite: 150. Offered January Term. 3 credits.

EDUC-230  EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY

Applications to teaching and school learning of behavioral, cognitive, and humanist learning theories, human development and motivational concepts, and assessment and evaluation procedures.
Prerequisite: 150. 4 credits. (IS)

EDUC-240  FOUNDATIONS OF TEACHING LINGUISTICALLY AND CULTURALLY DIVERSE STUDENTS

An overview of linguistically and culturally appropriate teaching strategies for teaching English Language Learners (ELL) in the mainstream classroom. A review of current second language learning theory and an application of these theories to planning effective instruction for students with limited English proficiency. An examination of second language development and cultural issues that affect ELL's academic performance in the mainstream classroom.
Prerequisites: 150, 230, or consent of instructor. 3 credits. (US)

EDUC-245  EDUCATIONAL LINQUISTICS AND LANGUAGE ACQUISITION FOR ESOL

Current theory and research in first and second language acquisition and issues in linguistics applied to linguistically and culturally diverse students. Topics in language acquisition include historical and current theories, language stages, as well as the factors that influence learning an additional language. Topics in educational linguistics include concepts in phonology, orthography, phonics, morphology, syntax, semantics and pragmatics, with a focus on classroom applications.
Prerequisites: 150, 230, 240. 3 credits.

EDUC-250  LANGUAGE POLICY, ISSUES AND ADVOCACY FOR ESOL

Analyze and evaluate the historical, political, socio-cultural, and linguistic issues related to local, state, and federal laws and policies regarding English Language Learners (ELL), their families, schools and community. Assess and advocate for ELL students to develop policies and systems of support for ELL students.
Prerequisites: 150, 230. Offered January of even numbered years. 3 credits.

EDUC-270  BECOMING AN EARLY CHILDHOOD TEACHER

An overview of the philosophy, methods, and materials used in child care, preschool, kindergarten, and primary classrooms. Beginning with birth experiences, following the physical, social, emotional, and cognitive development of children through the primary grades. Educational programs for child care centers, preschools, kindergartens, and the primary grades. Requires 30 clock hours of field experience in a preschool setting.
Prerequisites: 150, 230, and sophomore standing or consent of instructor. 3 credits.

EDUC-275  TEACHING ART

Projects in several media appropriate for teaching art in the schools. Art teaching methods.
Prerequisite: 150. 3 credits. (CS)

EDUC-290  CONTENT LITERACY AND DEVELOPMENT IN ADOLESCENCE

An exploration of adolescent development and literacy. Physical, social, emotional, and cognitive development of children from the intermediate grades through high school. An examination of theories, strategies, and assessment of multiple literacies to enhance learning in secondary subject matter classrooms. Requires 20 clock hours of field experience in a middle school setting.
Prerequisites: 150, 230, and sophomore standing or consent of instructor. 3 credits.

EDUC-301  SUPERVISED TEACHING ASSISTANT

Supervised work in a public school setting to develop skills in planning, implementing, and evaluating instruction as well as in establishing a climate conducive to learning. Enrollment by departmental directive for those students who, in the judgment of the department, require more extensive time in a clinical experience at a pre-student teaching level before assuming the responsibilities of student teaching. 1-12 credits.

EDUC-302  DIVERSITY AND INCLUSION

A broad interdisciplinary examination of the school-society relationship in the United States and of the many issues embedded in this relationship including equal opportunity, students with special needs, human diversity, ideology, politics, and social change.
Prerequisites: 150, 230, and junior standing. 4 credits. (IS or US, MWI)

EDUC-305  GENERAL METHODS AND MANAGEMENT

Techniques of classroom teaching: the planning process, implementation of instruction, assessment of learning, use of educational resources, and classroom management. An introduction to teaching methods and classroom management as a foundation for future development in content specific methods courses.
Prerequisites: 150, 230, 270 or 290. 4 credits.

EDUC-340  PLANNING IMPLEMENTING, AND ASSESSING INSTRUCTION FOR ESOL

Current curriculum models, materials, teaching approaches and assessment techniques that maximize the language development and academic achievement of English language learners. Emphasizes strategies related to planning, implementing, and managing instruction that enable students in different proficiency levels to access the core curriculum and develop language skills.
Prerequisites: 150, 230, 240. Offered January of odd-numbered years. 3 credits.

EDUC-401  TEACHING LITERACY I

Theories, concepts, methods, and materials for developing literacy skills in children from primary through fourth grade. Matching instruction to individual student's needs, abilities, and interests. Integrating children's literature. Using assessment to drive instruction. Aligning to state and federal standards.
Prerequisites: 150, 230, 270 or 290, and prerequisites or co-requisites of 302 and 305, or consent of instructor. 4 credits.

EDUC-402  TEACHING LITERACY II

Theories, concepts, methods, and materials for developing literacy skills in students from fourth through tenth grade. Matching instruction to individual student's needs, abilities, and interests. Integrating children's and young adult literature. Using assessment to drive instruction. Aligning to state and federal standards.
Prerequisites: 150, 230, 270 or 290, and prerequisites or co-requisites of 302 and 305, or consent of instructor. 4 credits.

EDUC-430  CONTENT METHODS FOR MIDDLE AND HIGH SCHOOL TEACHERS

Curriculum, methods and assessment in the middle and high school content fields. Assignment to sections based upon teaching major. Observation and application in middle and high school classrooms. May be repeated for credit with different subjects.
Prerequisites: 150, 230, 290, and prerequisites or co-requisite of 305, or consent of instructor. Offered fall. 3 credits.

EDUC-448  TEACHING MATHEMATICS

Approaches to teaching mathematics with a focus on how children learn concepts, develop skills, and apply mathematics to their daily lives. Overview of the mathematics curriculum. Emphasis on teaching problem solving, number concepts, technology, basic operations with whole and rational numbers, probability and statistics, geometry, measurement, and algebra.
Prerequisites: 150, 230, 270 or 290, 302, 305, 401, or consent of instructor. 3 credits.

EDUC-449  TEACHING SCIENCE

Dimensions of science; science curriculum, observation, model building, discrepant events, inquiry, application of the scientific process, reporting findings, resources for teaching science, and assessment of science education.
Prerequisites: 150, 230, 270 or 290, 302, 305, 401, or consent of instructor. 3 credits.

EDUC-450  TEACHING SOCIAL STUDIES

Current trends in social studies, inquiry, discovery and group processes, creative activities and experiences, community resources, technology in social studies, thematic and integrative planning.
Prerequisites: 150, 230, 270 or 290, and prerequisites or co-requisites of 302 and 305, or consent of instructor. 3 credits.

EDUC-480  INDEPENDENT STUDY

Offered fall, January, spring. 1-5 credits.

EDUC-491  STUDENT TEACHING: EARLY CHILDHOOD

Supervised work experience in public school classrooms with students from age three through primary grades. May be repeated for credit.
Prerequisites: admission to student teaching. 4 credits (part-time) or 12 credits (full-time).

EDUC-492  STUDENT TEACHING: ELEMENTARY

Supervised work experience in public school classrooms with students in intermediate elementary grades. May be repeated for credit.
Prerequisites: admission to student teaching. 4 credits (part-time) or 12 credits (full-time).

EDUC-493  STUDENT TEACHING: MIDDLE LEVEL

Supervised work experience in public school classrooms with students in middle school/junior high. May be repeated for credit.
Prerequisites: admission to student teaching. 4 credits (part-time) or 12 credits (full-time).

EDUC-494  STUDENT TEACHING: HIGH SCHOOL

Supervised work experience in public school classrooms with students in high school. May be repeated for credit.
Prerequisites: admission to student teaching. 4 credits (part-time) or 12 credits (full-time).

EDUC-496  SEMINAR FOR FULL-TIME STUDENT TEACHING

Examination of topics related to entering the teaching profession, challenges associated with student teaching and personal teaching effectiveness.
Prerequisites: admission to student teaching. Taken concurrently with Full-Time Student Teaching. 1 credit.

EDUC-497  SEMINAR FOR PART-TIME STUDENT TEACHING

Examination of topics related to beginning student teaching, challenges associated with student teaching, and personal teaching effectiveness.
Prerequisite: admission to student teaching. Taken concurrently with Part-Time Student Teaching. 1 credit.

Electronic Arts

EART-485  ELECTRONIC ARTS SEMINAR

Capstone class for the electronic arts major. Production by students of a web portfolio displaying a cohesive body of work and related critical papers.
Prerequisites: AAVC 242, MSCM 150, COMP 262 or consent of instructor. Offered spring. 3 credits. (MWI)

English

ENGL-020  LITERARY MAGAZINE

Editing the college literary magazine, Camas. Planning, soliciting submissions, making selections, preparing manuscripts for printing. 1 credit. (EL)

ENGL-120  LITERARY MAGAZINE

Editing the college literary magazine, Camas. Planning, soliciting submissions, making selections, preparing manuscripts for printing. For departmental majors only.
Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 1 credit.

ENGL-125  ENGLISH GRAMMAR

For students who need an introduction to or a refresher in English grammar, including parts of speech, phrases, basic sentence patterns, tense, mood, and punctuation. 2 credits.

ENGL-260  TRANSATLANTIC LITERATURE

Examination of themes finding expression over a broad historical reach in the Anglo- American literary tradition. May include works of global literature beyond or outside that tradition. May be repeated once for credit. 4 credits. (CS or GP)

ENGL-275  CRITICAL METHODS OF LITERARY STUDY

Formal initiation of majors and minors in both literature and creative writing to critical and aesthetic analysis of literary texts. Concentrated practice in close reading of major works in various genres, as well as exploration of different critical methodologies. Should be completed before the start of the junior year. 4 credits. (WI)

ENGL-279  PORTFOLIO

Initial portfolio course for English and Creative Writing major. Documents progress toward learning outcomes of major. Students should register for course with departmental academic advisor. 1 credit. (Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory)

ENGL-285  SURVEY OF U.S. LITERATURE: BEGINNINGS TO PRESENT

Introduction to U.S. Literature from its pre-Columbian antecedents to the present, including colonialism, the American Renaissance, Realism, Naturalism, Modernism, and Postmodernism. Emphasis on themes involving nature, modernity, and U. S. literary pluralism. Lecture/discussion. Offered fall. (CS or US)

ENGL-315  ACADEMIC WRITING & CONSULTING

Continued instruction and experience in academic writing (two hours/week) combined with work as a staff member in the Linfield Writing Center (four hours/week). College writing across the disciplines, writing strategies, effective interpersonal communication in helping others write, practical understanding of the intricacies of English. May be repeated once for credit.
Prerequisites: INQS 125 and consent of the instructor. 4 credits. (MWI)

ENGL-316  CREATIVE WRITING: POETRY

Workshop, conferences, and practice in techniques of poetry writing. Reading of modern poets and study of genre. An option for Creative Writing majors and others. May be repeated once for credit. 4 credits.

ENGL-317  CREATIVE WRITING: FICTION

Workshop, conferences, and practice in techniques of fiction writing, especially the short story. Reading of modern fiction writers and study of various fictional genres. An option for Creative Writing majors and others. May be repeated once for credit. 4 credits.

ENGL-318  CREATIVE WRITING: SCRIPTS

Workshop, conferences, and practice in techniques of writing dramatic fiction in script form for films, television, or stage. Conventions of dramatic structure, character development, dialogue, form, and current practice. For Creative Writing majors and others. May be repeated once for credit. 4 credits.

ENGL-319  CREATIVE WRITING: NON-FICTION

Workshop focused on the personal essay, with class discussion of works in progress and readings by such writers as Barry Lopez, Ursula LeGuin, Barbara Tuchman, and Wendell Berry. Weekly writing assignments and in-class exercises. Practice in finding ideas, getting started, using storytelling and creative writing techniques, keeping journals to gather material, incorporating research, and revising. Final project: a revised portfolio of essays. May be repeated once for credit. 4 credits.

ENGL-321  CREATIVE WRITING: MULTI-GENRE WORKSHOP

Advanced imaginative writing workshop in four genres (poetry, fiction, creative nonfiction, drama/screenplay) or in cross genre experiment. Emphasis on development of ambitious original work, revision, refinement of genre related techniques, and critiquing. May be repeated once for credit.
Prerequisites: 200 plus two literature courses, plus one genre specific writing class: 316, 317, 318, or 319, or consent of instructor. Offered at least every other year. 4 credits. (CS, WI)

ENGL-325  LITERARY GENRES

Focus on one genre, such as the novel, drama, poetry, autobiography, short story, or epic. History and characteristics of the genre with readings and analysis of significant examples. May be repeated once for credit with different content.
Prerequisites: INQS 125 and completion of at least one literature course or consent of instructor. 4 credits. (CS, MWI)

ENGL-327  INTRODUCTION TO FILM (CROSS-LISTED WITH MSCM 327)

See MSCM 327. 4 credits.

ENGL-330  MAJOR FIGURES

Focus on the work of one writer such as John Milton or Virginia Woolf, or two closely connected writers such as W. B. Yeats and James Joyce, or Emily Dickinson and Sylvia Plath. May be repeated once for credit with different writers.
Prerequisites: INQS 125 and completion of at least one literature course or consent of instructor. 4 credits. (MWI)

ENGL-340  ENGLISH LITERATURE: THE MIDDLE AGES (TO 1485)

Writers and works from the Anglo-Saxon, Anglo- Norman, and Middle English traditions, reflecting the medieval outlook from Beowulf to Chaucer to Malory.
Prerequisite: INQS 125 or consent of instructor. 4 credits. (CS or VP)

ENGL-341  ENGLISH LITERATURE: THE 16TH AND 17TH CENTURIES

Writers and works from the early part of the English Renaissance through the great Elizabethan flowering and on into the Jacobean period at the beginning of the 17th century. Analysis of typical forms of the period such as the sonnet, essay, and play.
Prerequisite: INQS 125 or consent of instructor. 4 credits. (CS or VP)

ENGL-342  ENGLISH LITERATURE: RESTORATION AND 18TH CENTURY

Representative literary forms and ideas from Restoration and 18th-century writers.
Prerequisite: INQS 125 or consent of instructor. 4 credits. (CS or VP)

ENGL-343  ENGLISH LITERATURE: THE ROMANTIC PERIOD

The major Romantic writers from 1785 to 1830, usually including such poets as Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Shelley, Keats, and introducing one or more novelists such as Austen, Radcliffe, Scott, or Shelley.
Prerequisite: INQS 125 or consent of instructor. 4 credits. (CS or VP)

ENGL-344  ENGLISH LITERATURE: THE VICTORIAN AGE

The major writers in prose and poetry from 1830 to 1901, usually including the poets Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Tennyson, Fitzgerald, Robert Browning, Arnold, Dante Gabriel Rossetti, Christina Rossetti, and Hopkins; the prose writers Carlyle, Mill, Ruskin, and Huxley; at least one novel and one play.
Prerequisite: INQS 125 or consent of instructor. 4 credits. (CS or VP)

ENGL-345  ENGLISH LITERATURE: 20TH CENTURY

Representative forms and ideas in English prose and poetry of the 20th century.
Prerequisite: INQS 125 or consent of instructor. 4 credits. (CS)

ENGL-350  SHAKESPEARE'S COMEDIES AND HISTORIES: PERFORMING GENDER AND SEXUALITY

Selected comedies and histories in their historical and critical context. Emphasis on comedy as a dramatic form and questions of gender and sexuality as they are represented through performance.
Prerequisite: INQS 125 or consent of instructor. 4 credits (CS or VP)

ENGL-351  SHAKESPEARE: TRAGEDIES AND TRAGICOMEDIES

Selected tragedies and tragicomedies in their historical and critical context; emphasis on tragedy as a dramatic form.
Prerequisite: INQS 125 or consent of instructor. 4 credits. (CS or VP)

ENGL-363  AMERICAN LITERATURE SURVEY: 1960 T0 THE PRESENT

Literary responses to the transformations of American life in the latter 20th century as a result of the Civil Rights and Womens Movements, the Vietnam War, Sixties youth culture, environmentalism, and the continuing seductions of the American Dream. The flowering of American ethnic and minority writing. Postmodernism and the influences of popular culture.
Prerequisite: INQS 125 or consent of instructor. 4 credits. (CS)

ENGL-365  POSTCOLONIAL LITERATURE IN ENGLISH

Exploration of postcolonial writers in English interrogating themes of colonization, hybridity, globalization. Authors studied may include but not limited to Chinua Achebe, J.M. Coetzee, Jamaica Kincaid, Salman Rushdie, Tsitsi Dangaremba, V.S. Naipaul and Derek Walcott
Prerequisites: INQS 125 and completion of at least one literature course or consent of instructor. 4 credits. (CS or GP)

ENGL-370  READINGS IN LITERATURE

An overview of and internship in teaching literature in the multicultural classroom.
Prerequisites: one literature course and consent of the instructor. 4 credits. (MWI)

ENGL-385  THE NOVEL IN THE UNITED STATES

Examination of a major U.S. literary genre via themes linking American fiction over time. Study of aesthetic experimentation within the genre. Topics will vary. May be repeated once for credit. 4 credits. (CS or US)

ENGL-395  DIRECTED READING

Reading and discussion course organized around a writer or theme. Emphasis on close reading, articulate discussion and evaluation of cultural significance of literary and/or popular texts. May be repeated once for credit.
Prerequisites: INQS 125 and one literature course. Offered occasionally. 1 credit.

ENGL-425  HISTORY OF THE ENGLISH LANG

The English language from Indo-European beginnings through Anglo-Saxon, Middle English, and modern English. Addresses phonetic, morphemic, and syntactic changes as well as current linguistic theory. 3 credits.

ENGL-439  PEER INSTRUCTION

Advanced opportunity for outstanding students to assist faculty members in the classroom or laboratory. Focus on course content and pedagogy.
Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 3 credits. (Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory)

ENGL-450  LITERARY CRITICISM

The dominant trends in 20th century literary criticism from a variety of perspectives, and practice in applying literary theory to specific texts.
Prerequisite: 275. 4 credits. (MWI)

ENGL-479  PORTFOLIO

Senior portfolio course for English and Creative Writing major. Documents progress toward learning outcomes for major. Students should register for course with departmental academic advisor. 1 credit. (Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory)

ENGL-480  INDEPENDENT STUDY

Program of directed tutorial reading on some topic or problem within the discipline relating to the special interests of the student and supervised by a departmental faculty member. 1-5 credits.

ENGL-485  SENIOR SEMINAR: CREATIVE WRITING

Completion in conference and workshop of a substantial writing project as the final requirement in the Creative Writing major. Such original work as a collection of poetry; a collection of short stories; a novel or novella; a collection of creative essays; a collection of short dramatic works; a full length play or film script. A senior level course for students who have previously completed most of the requirements for the Creative Writing major.
Prerequisite: 275. 4 credits. (MWI)

ENGL-486  SENIOR SEMINAR: LITERATURE

Advanced study of a specialized literary subject in a seminar setting. Completion of a substantial critical paper. A senior level course for students who have previously completed most of the requirements for the English major.
Prerequisite: 275. 4 credits. (MWI)

ENGL-487  INTERNSHIP

Supervised employment in a work setting which draws upon the writing, speaking, oral, and analytical skills developed by English and Creative Writing majors. Open to seniors and second-semester juniors with permission from faculty supervisor. No more than 4 credits to be counted toward the major. 1-8 credits. (EL)

ENGL-490  HONORS THESIS, LITERATURE OR CREATIVE WRITING

4 credits (WI)

English Language and Culture Program

ELCP-095  INDIVIDUALIZED STUDY

Development of reading, writing, and listening skills through a program of self-access assignments specifically selected to meet the individuals needs. Schedule of supervised work and individual tutoring. 1-2 credits.

ELCP-100  LANGUAGE PRACTICE: SOCIAL AND ACADEMIC SKILLS

An intensive course in functional English for ELCP students to facilitate integration into the community and preparation for academic study. Includes survival skills, cultural awareness, basic computer and study skills, and writing projects.
$10 fee. 4 credits.

ELCP-101  ACADEMIC LISTENING AND SPEAKING I

Development of listening and speaking skills enabling students to function effectively in an academic setting. Emphasis on prepared and impromptu speeches, group discussions, debate, and video-based activities. Continued practice of English in informal and formal settings: role play, simulations, and community field work.
$10 fee. 4 credits.

ELCP-102  ACADEMIC LISTENING AND SPEAKING II

Continuation of 101 to prepare students for success in academic courses. Training in group discussion dynamics. Participation in whole class/small group discussions of current issues. Recognition and practice of formal and informal listening/speaking skills.
$10 fee. 4 credits.

ELCP-103  ADVANCED PRONUNCIATION

An intensive course in pronunciation of American English. Development of accent modification techniques which result in increased intelligibility. Special emphasis is placed on auditory discrimination, correct pronunciation of English speech sounds, complete word production, stress and intonation patterns. Exercises tailored to individual student's speech patterns with targeted feedback using Compton PESL methodology to achieve desired outcomes.
$10 fee. 3 credits.

ELCP-111  INTRO TO COLLEGE READING

Intermediate level reading course enabling students to become independent readers. Student selection of reading materials: fiction and nonfiction. Linked activities focusing on summary writing, vocabulary development, oral reports, and group discussions. 4 credits.

ELCP-112  ADVANCED COLLEGE READING AND CRITICAL THINKING SKILLS

Advanced reading skills course to develop students' critical thinking and discussion skills in preparation for academic course work. Reading linked to formal/informal writing projects. 4 credits.

ELCP-120  GRAMMAR WORKSHOP

An in-depth review of grammatical structures within the context of students' own writing projects. Grammar activities and exercises tailored to meet individual students needs. 4 credits.

ELCP-121  INTRODUCTION TO COLLEGE COMPOSITION

Intermediate level writing course to prepare students for academic essay and report writing. Emphasis on self/peer proofreading and editing strategies. 4 credits.

ELCP-122  RESEARCH PAPER PREPARATION

Introduction to academic research paper writing: topic development, library research, paraphrase/synthesis skills, and documentation leading to presentation of acceptable research paper. 4 credits.

ELCP-150  ACADEMIC AND EXPERIENTIAL ENCOUNTERS IN THE UNITED STATES

An introduction for international students to living, studying, and working in the United States. Skills development in independent living in a new culture. Focus on cross cultural relationship building, problem solving, written and verbal communication in the work place including accent/dialect comprehension. Preparation of individual/group presentations and a research paper. 4 credits.

ELCP-160  THEMATIC TOPICS

Integration of all language skills (listening, reading, writing, and speaking) in a content theme such as American Culture and the Community, Discovering American Cultures through Film. May be repeated with different content. 4 credits. (US)

ELCP-170  READINGS IN LITERATURE

An introduction to reading and writing about literature for non-native speakers of English. Study of literary genres: short story, poetry, and novel. Focus on creative writing projects and formal analysis essays. 4 credits. (CS)

ELCP-180  TOEIC PREPARATION

Test of English for International Communication (TOEIC) Preparation. An intensive preparation course for the TOEIC test. Focus on building vocabulary, learning the structure and directions of the TOEIC, learning to discriminate between test answer choices, and practicing English in practical day to day situations in the international workplace setting. 2 credits.

ELCP-190  ADVANCED ACADEMIC SKILLS

Study of language and learning skills for advanced ELCP students simultaneously enrolled in a particular academic content course in another department. Intensive study of the language used in the content material through linked reading, writing, listening, and speaking activities. May be repeated with different content. 3 credits.

Environmental Studies

ENVS-030  NATURAL HISTORY OF THIS PLACE WE INHABIT

Understanding the bio-physical world we inhabit via experiential learning on field trips to local habitats. Minimum of 35 hours of field trips. May be repeated with different content, though counted only once toward the Environmental Studies major or minor. 1 credit. (EL)

ENVS-090  ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES FORUM

Reports and readings on contemporary environmental issues. Weekly discussions in small seminar groups. Required of all environmental studies majors and minors. May be repeated for credit. 1 credit. (EL)

ENVS-107  ENERGY & THE ENVIRONMENT (CROSS-LISTED WITH PHYS 107)

Introduction to the concept of energy (kinetic, potential, thermal) and the physical laws governing energy transformation. Forms of energy consumed by society (fossil fuels, nuclear power, renewable energy) and their impacts on the environment (nuclear waste, global warming, air pollution). 3 credits. (QR)

ENVS-230  INTRODUCTION TO GIS

Geographical Information Systems concepts and techniques for creating maps and analyzing spatial and attribute data. Emphasis on using GIS to understand relationship between humans and the natural environment. Lecture and lab.
Prerequisite: MATH 140 or consent of instructor. 3 credits (IS or QR)

ENVS-250  ENVIRONMENTAL SOCIOLOGY (also listed as SOAN 250)

Relationship between social groups and natural and human-built environment, human-induced environmental decline, sustainable alternatives, environmentalism as social movement, public environmental opinion, environmental racism and classism. Social dimensions of built environment including urban sprawl, development, place, space, community, and urban design. 4 credits. (IS)

ENVS-300  TOPICS IN ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY

Analysis of public policy issues pertaining to the environment such as: pollution control, energy production and conservation, greenhouse gas emissions, ozone depletion, acid rain, riparian area preservation, land use planning, government regulation versus free market environmentalism, Endangered Species Act. May be repeated as topics vary.
Prerequisite: MATH 140 or ECON 210 or POLS 335 or consent of instructor. 3 credits. (IS, WI)

ENVS-360  FOREST ECOLOGY AND MANAGEMENT

Basic principles of forest ecology with emphasis on Pacific Northwest. Management of forests with reference to ecological, political and economic factors. Lecture, laboratory and field trips.
$50 lab fee.
Prerequisites: ENVS 201 or BIOL 210. Offered spring even years. 4 credits. (NW)

ENVS-380  CONSERVATION BIOLOGY

Investigation into scientific, social, and political factors that affect species diversity. Includes examination of population biology, ecology, and evolution in relation to the emergence, extinction, and preservation of specifies. Explores the role of the scientist in society with consideration of the history of science, the history of the environmental movement, environmental ethics, and politics. Lecture and laboratory.
$50 lab fee.
Prerequisites: 201 and 203 or BIOL 210 and 211, junior or senior standing. Offered fall. 4 credits.

ENVS-385  RESERACH METHODS IN ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

Examine basic principles in laboratory and field research in environmental science. Develop proficiency in research designs in environmental science in both the field and the lab. Build proficiency in data collection and analysis through written and oral presentation of findings. Develop principles and basic skills necessary to criticize research literature.
$60 lab fee.
Prerequisites: 201 or BIOL 210/211; MATH 140; completion of science course with laboratory component. 5 credits.

ENVS-439  PEER INSTRUCTION

Opportunity for outstanding students to assist faculty in the classroom and laboratory. May not be repeated for credit.
Prerequisites: application and consent of instructor. 3-4 credits. (Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory) (EL)

ENVS-440  EPIDEMIOLOGY (CROSS-LISTED WITH HSCI 440)

See HSCI 440. 3 credits.

ENVS-480  INDEPENDENT STUDY

Supplemental work in environmental study for advanced students with adequate preparation for independent work.
Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 1-5 credits.

ENVS-487  INTERNSHIP

Opportunity to gain practical experience in an organization involved in environmental work.
Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 2-5 credits (EL)

ENVS-490  INDEPENDENT RESEARCH OR THESIS

Field, laboratory, or library research on a topic of interest to the student, requiring a substantial written report. For advanced, self-reliant students.
Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 2-5 credits.

Gender Studies

GENS-200  INTRODUCTION TO GENDER STUDIES

An interdisciplinary encounter with the contemporary study of gender and its new paradigms for investigating the human condition. Weekly guest lectures addressing gender theory contributions to such disciplines such as religious studies, philosophy, literature, history, music, political science, anthropology, sociology, education, the sciences, and mathematics. 3 credits.

GENS-375  SPECIAL TOPICS IN GENDER STUDIES

Examination of a specialized topic in contemporary gender studies either arising within a single discipline or inviting cross-disciplinary analysis. Examples include "Gender and Science," "Women in Management," "Feminist Theologies"," Women in Theatre," "Gender as Metaphor in the Bible," "The Social Construction of Masculinities." 3 credits.

GENS-390  GENDER THEORY

An interdisciplinary examination of theories that have shaped scholarly inquiry into the nature of gendered experience, including the origins of gendered difference, the nature and origins of patriarchy; and the intersections of gender, race, class, sexuality, and nationality as categories of political and cultural analysis. Feminist critiques of and innovations within the methodologies of many disciplines. The capstone experience for the Gender Studies minor.
Prerequisites: SOAN 205 or PSYC 262 or GENS 200, at least two additional courses earning Gender Studies credit, and junior or senior standing. 4 credits (UQ or GP, WI)

Health, Human Performance and Athletics

HHPA-001  INTERCOLLEGIATE FOOTBALL

Paracurricular courses are repeatable for credit.1-2 credits (EL)

HHPA-003A  INTERCOLLEGIATE CROSS COUNTRY: MEN

Paracurricular courses are repeatable for credit.1-2 credits (EL)

HHPA-003B  INTERCOLLEGIATE CROSS COUNTRY: WOMEN

Paracurricular courses are repeatable for credit.1-2 credits (EL)

HHPA-004A  INTERCOLLEGIATE SOCCER: MEN

Paracurricular courses are repeatable for credit.1-2 credits (EL)

HHPA-004B  INTERCOLLEGIATE SOCCER: WOMEN

Paracurricular courses are repeatable for credit.1-2 credits (EL)

HHPA-005B  INTERCOLLEGIATE VOLLEYBALL: WOMEN

Paracurricular courses are repeatable for credit.1-2 credits (EL)

HHPA-006A  INTERCOLLEGIATE BASKETBALL: MEN

Paracurricular courses are repeatable for credit.1-2 credits (EL)

HHPA-006B  INTERCOLLEGIATE BASKETBALL: WOMEN

Paracurricular courses are repeatable for credit.1-2 credits (EL)

HHPA-008A  INTERCOLLEGIATE SWIMMING: MEN

Paracurricular courses are repeatable for credit.1-2 credits (EL)

HHPA-008B  INTERCOLLEGIATE SWIMMING: WOMEN

Paracurricular courses are repeatable for credit.1-2 credits (EL)

HHPA-010A  INTERCOLLEGIATE TRACK AND FIELD: MEN

Paracurricular courses are repeatable for credit.1-2 credits (EL)

HHPA-010B  INTERCOLLEGIATE TRACK AND FIELD: WOMEN

Paracurricular courses are repeatable for credit.1-2 credits (EL)

HHPA-011  INTERCOLLEGIATE BASEBALL

Paracurricular courses are repeatable for credit.1-2 credits (EL)

HHPA-012  INTERCOLLEGIATE SOFTBALL

Paracurricular courses are repeatable for credit.1-2 credits (EL)

HHPA-013A  INTERCOLLEGIATE TENNIS: MEN

Paracurricular courses are repeatable for credit.1-2 credits (EL)

HHPA-013B  INTERCOLLEGIATE TENNIS: WOMEN

Paracurricular courses are repeatable for credit.1-2 credits (EL)

HHPA-014A  INTERCOLLEGIATE GOLF: MEN

Paracurricular courses are repeatable for credit.1-2 credits (EL)

HHPA-014B  INTERCOLLEGIATE GOLF: WOMEN

Paracurricular courses are repeatable for credit.1-2 credits (EL)

HHPA-015B  INTERCOLLEGIATE LACROSSE: WOMEN

Paracurricular courses are repeatable for credit.1-2 credits (EL)

HHPA-016  INTERCOLLEGIATE CHEERLEADING

Paracurricular courses are repeatable for credit.1-2 credits (EL)

HHPA-020  BADMINTON


$60 fee (
$65 beginning 2010 fall). Paracurricularcourses are repeatable for credit.1-2 credits (EL)

HHPA-021  AQUA AEROBICS


$60 fee (
$65 beginning 2010 fall). Paracurricularcourses are repeatable for credit.1-2 credits (EL)

HHPA-022  AQUATIC TRAINING AND CONDITIONS

Skill acquisition and content inherent in trainingand conditioning in an aquatic environment.Emphasis on workout programs as an adjunct toland-based training.
$210 fee.1 credit (EL)

HHPA-023  TENNIS


$60 fee (
$65 beginning 2010 fall). Paracurricularcourses are repeatable for credit.1-2 credits (EL)

HHPA-024  POWER LIFTING


$60 fee (
$65 beginning 2010 fall). Paracurricularcourses are repeatable for credit.1-2 credits (EL)

HHPA-025  WEIGHT TRAINING


$60 fee (
$65 beginning 2010 fall). Paracurricularcourses are repeatable for credit.1-2 credits (EL)

HHPA-026  HANDBALL


$60 fee (
$65 beginning 2010 fall). Paracurricularcourses are repeatable for credit.1-2 credits (EL)

HHPA-027  RACQUETBALL


$60 fee (
$65 beginning 2010 fall). Paracurricularcourses are repeatable for credit.1-2 credits (EL)

HHPA-028  VOLLEYBALL


$60 fee (
$65 beginning 2010 fall). Paracurricularcourses are repeatable for credit.1-2 credits (EL)

HHPA-029  CYCLING


$60 fee (
$65 beginning 2010 fall). Paracurricularcourses are repeatable for credit.1-2 credits (EL)

HHPA-030  SOCCER


$60 fee (
$65 beginning 2010 fall). Paracurricularcourses are repeatable for credit.1-2 credits (EL)

HHPA-033  PICKLEBALL


$60 fee (
$65 beginning 2010 fall). Paracurricularcourses are repeatable for credit.1-2 credits (EL)

HHPA-036  DOWNHILL SKIING


$75 + cost of lift tickets/ski rentals.Paracurricular courses are repeatable for credit.1 credit (EL)

HHPA-040  COMMUNITY SERVICE

Paracurricular courses are repeatable for credit.1-2 credits (EL)

HHPA-047  BEGINNING INDOOR ROCK CLIMBING


$60 fee (
$65 beginning 2010 fall). Paracurricularcourses are repeatable for credit.1-2 credits (EL)

HHPA-051  TEAM BUILDING AND OUTDOOR PURSUITS


$60 fee (
$65 beginning 2010 fall). Paracurricularcourses are repeatable for credit.1-2 credits (EL)

HHPA-053  VOLLEYBALL, SOCCER AND GOLF


$60 fee (
$65 beginning 2010 fall). Paracurricularcourses are repeatable for credit.1-2 credits (EL)

HHPA-054  BASKETBALL, SPEEDBALL, SOFTBALL


$60 fee (
$65 beginning 2010 fall). Paracurricularcourses are repeatable for credit.1-2 credits (EL)

HHPA-055  RACQUET SPORTS


$60 fee (
$65 beginning 2010 fall). Paracurricularcourses are repeatable for credit.1-2 credits (EL)

HHPA-060  AQUATIC FITNESS


$60 fee (
$65 beginning 2010 fall). Paracurricularcourses are repeatable for credit.1-2 credits (EL)

HHPA-065  SPEED/AGILITY/QUICKNESS CONDITIONING


$60 (
$65 beginning 2010 fall)fee. Paracurricularcourses are repeatable for credit.1-2 credits (EL)

HHPA-067  SCUBA

In addition to the course fee of
$365, there willbe added costs for equipment & open dives.Paracurricular courses are repeatable for credit.1-2 credits (EL)

HHPA-068  ADVANCED SCUBA

In addition to the course fee of
$265, there willbe added costs for equipment & open dives.Paracurricular courses are repeatable for credit.1-2 credits (EL)

HHPA-086  ADVANCED TENNIS


$60 fee (
$65 beginning 2010 fall). Paracurricularcourses are repeatable for credit.1-2 credits (EL)

HHPA-091A  WINTER TRACK AND FIELD: MEN

HHPA-091B  WINTER TRACK AND FIELD: WOMEN

HHPA-093  RESCUE DIVER

In addition to the course fee of
$265, there willbe added costs for equipment & open dives.Paracurricular courses are repeatable for credit.2 credits (EL)

HHPA-164  LIFEGUARD TRAINING

Skill acquisition and background content for lifeguards as prescribed by the American Red Cross, including water safety, artificial respiration, actions appropriate to choking, management of spinal injury, first aid and CPR.
$38 fee. Offered spring. 2 credits.

HHPA-165  WATER SAFETY INSTRUCTION

Swimming skills and aquatics teaching progressions as prescribed by the American Red Cross for Water Safety Instruction Certification.
$8 fee. Offered spring of odd-numbered years. 2 credits.

HHPA-170  PEER HEALTH EDUCATION METHODS: WELLNESS

Information, methods, and resources for planning and implementing peer health education programs in wellness. Offered fall. 2 credits.

HHPA-171  PEER HEALTH EDUCATION METHODS: INFORMED CHOICES

Information, methods, and resources for planning and implementing peer health education programs for alcohol and drug prevention. 1 credit.

HHPA-172  PEER HEALTH EDUCATION METHODS: CATS

Information, methods, and resources for planning and implementing peer health education programs for sexual assault prevention.
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 2 credits.

HHPA-183  SEMINAR IN HEALTH AND HUMAN MOVEMENT

For students considering careers, fields or professions in areas relating to health and human performance including exercise science, athletic training, physical education and health education. Examine the past, present and future of education, disciplines and careers that relate to health and human performance in contemporary society. 2 credits.

HHPA-184  PREVENTION AND CARE OF ATHLETIC INJURIES

Emphasis on study of etiology and mechanism of injury, pathology, and recognition of clinical signs and symptoms of athletic injury. Knowledge required for proper recognition, management, and prevention of athletic injuries.
$15 lab fee. 3 credits.

HHPA-221  ATHLETIC TRAINING PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE I: PORTFOLIO/INTRO SKILLS

Professional experience in athletic training and application of athletic training courses. Clinical field experience required.
$50 lab fee.
Prerequisites: 184, 284, sophomore or junior standing, and consent of instructor. Offered fall. 2 credits.

HHPA-231  PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE II: TAPING, BRACING AND EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT

Professional experience in athletic training and application of athletic training courses. Clinical field experience required.
$50 lab fee.
Prerequisites: 221, sophomore or junior standing, and consent of instructor. Offered spring. 2 credits.

HHPA-250  PREVENTION AND CONTROL OF DISEASE

An introduction to epidemiological principles as they relate to the understanding of communicable and non-communicable diseases in humans. Special emphasis on prevention and control of diseases through health education and health promotion orientations and strategies. Offered fall. 3 credits.

HHPA-283  RESPONDING TO EMERGENCIES, CPR

In-depth study and training in the techniques and procedures for giving emergency care to the suddenly ill or injured. Lectures, videos, demonstrations, and practice. Preparation for CPR and First Aid Red Cross certification.
$50 fee. Does not fulfill athletic training requirement. 2 credits.

HHPA-284  EMERGENCY RESPONSE

Advanced medical skills for the first responder in emergency situations. Lecture, video, simulation, and skill development in CPR and emergency care. Preparation for American Red Cross certification in 2-person CPR, emergency response, AED use, oxygen administration, disease prevention.
$50 fee.
Prerequisite: Athletic Training major status or consent of instructor. Offered spring. 3 credits.

HHPA-286  METHODS OF TEACHING ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY PHYSICAL EDUCATION

Developing teaching skills for elementary and secondary physical education classes. Emphasis on planning and organization of instruction, scope and sequence and age-appropriate instruction, teaching strategies, classroom management, teacher interaction and feedback, creation of a positive learning environment, student assessment and evaluation of the instructional process.
Prerequisites: 183, EDUC 150, consent of instructor, and Physical Education major or minor status. 4 credits.

HHPA-291  PROFESSIONAL ACTIVITIES I

Team building challenges, initiatives and adventure-oriented activities.
$50 fee.
Prerequisite: 286. Offered fall. 2 credits.

HHPA-293  PROFESSIONAL ACTIVITIES III

Volleyball, soccer, golf.
Prerequisite: 286. Offered fall. 2 credits.

HHPA-294  PROFESSIONAL ACTIVITIES IV

Basketball, non-traditional games, softball.
Prerequisite: 286. Offered spring. 2 credits.

HHPA-295  PROFESSIONAL ACTIVITIES V

Racquet sports including tennis, badminton, pickleball.
Prerequisite: 286. Offered spring. 2 credits.

HHPA-310  FOOTBALL COACHING THEORY

An examination of current defensive, offensive, and kicking game schemes and strategy. Analysis of common defensive fronts and popular offensive systems from integrated offensive and defensive perspectives. 2 credits.

HHPA-315  BASKETBALL COACHING THEORY

System of offensive and defensive play, analysis of fundamentals, conditioning, game strategy, team travel, finance, care of equipment, officiating at contests, and public relations. 2 credits.

HHPA-320  TRACK & FIELD COACHING THEORY

Conditioning, development, and selection of individuals for events; planning, officiating, and conducting meets; strategy and psychology of individual and team competition. Offered spring. 2 credits.

HHPA-321  PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE III: INJURY ASSESSMENT AND EVALUATION

Professional experience in athletic training and application of athletic training courses. Clinical field experience required.
$50 fee.
Prerequisites: 231, junior or senior standing, and consent of instructor. Offered fall. 2 credits.

HHPA-331  PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE IV: GENERAL MEDICAL AND THERAPEUTIC EXERCISE

Professional experience in athletic training and application of athletic training courses. Clinical field experience required.
$50 fee.
Prerequisites: 321, junior or senior standing, and consent of instructor. Offered spring. 2 credits.

HHPA-335  SOFTBALL COACHING THEORY

Fundamentals, techniques of position play, problems and duties of the coach, strategy, rules, scoring, conditioning, scheduling and team problems. Offered spring of odd-numbered years. 1 credit.

HHPA-336  VOLLEYBALL COACHING THEORY

An examination of the current fundamental techniques and coaching strategies involved with successful performance in volleyball. Offered fall. 2 credits

HHPA-340  SOCCER COACHING THEORY

Fundamentals, techniques, conditioning, game strategy, team travel problems, finance, care of equipment, officiating and conducting games, strategy and psychology of competition. 2 credits.

HHPA-341  FOUNDATIONS OF EXERCISE PHYSIOLOGY

The laws and principles of physiology as they relate to physical activity and training of the human body. Introduction to the field's specialized terminology, physiological analysis and training of human movement, and interrelationships among the principles, laws, and theories which enhance human movement and health from a physiological perspective.
Prerequisite: BIOL 213. Offered fall. 3 credits. (NW)

HHPA-345  BASEBALL COACHING THEORY

An examination of the current fundamental techniques and coaching strategies involved with successful performance in baseball. 2 credits.

HHPA-350  PSYCHOLOGICAL ASPECTS OF SPORT AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION

Psychology of perception, learning, personality, motivation, and emotion in relation to physical education and athletics. Motor aptitude and mental processes, including discipline, morale, motivation, and confidence. Offered fall. 3 credits.

HHPA-352  KINESIOLOGY

Human movement related to anatomical structure and mechanical principles; kinesiological analysis by means of a motor skills classification system and an outline for a systematic analysis that includes description, evaluation, and prescription.
Prerequisite: BIOL 212. Offered spring. 3 credits.

HHPA-365  PRINCIPLES OF TRAINING AND CONDITIONING CONDITIONING

Principles of Training and Conditioning - Basic principles and physiological foundations of neuromuscular conditioning, including applications to designing weight training, plyometric, speed, and general fitness programs. Lecture, discussions, and laboratory.
Prerequisites: BIOL 212 and 213, or consent of instructor. 3 credits.

HHPA-375  PATHOPHYSIOLOGY AND THERAPEUTIC EXERCISE

Analysis of the physiological response to injury and the use of rehabilitative techniques for athletic injuries. Lecture, discussion and laboratory.
$10 lab fee.
Prerequisites: 184, BIOL 212 and 213, or consent of instructor. 3 credits.

HHPA-376  THERAPEUTIC MODALITIES

Principles of electrophysics and biophysics, specific physiological effects, and therapeutic indications and contraindications associated with use of therapeutic modalities. Lectures, discussion, and laboratory.
$25 lab fee.
Prerequisites: 375 or consent of instructor. 3 credits. (MWI)

HHPA-381  SCHOOL HEALTH PROGRAMS

Policies and practices within the school program of health services, healthful environment, and health curriculum. Speakers and resources from various state and local health agencies; field experience in the public school health program. 3 credits.

HHPA-382  ADVANCED METHODS: NON-TRADITIONAL GAMES

Combines laboratory and theory course designed to develop and enhance proficiency and teaching skills of non-traditional games in a school-based setting. 2 credits.

HHPA-383  HEALTH EDUCATION METHODS

Materials, resources, and methods for health instruction. Construction, organization and delivery of lessons in health education, including use of technology. Health Education standards and assessment training. Application of andragogical and pedagogical principles.
Prerequisites: 180, EDUC 150, junior standing and Health Education major status, or consent of instructor. 3 credits.

HHPA-384  ADVANCED ASSESSMENT OF ATHLETIC INJURIES

Outlines the more common types of athletic injuries occurring to various anatomical structures. Advanced techniques in evaluation, recognition of clinical signs and symptoms, pathology, and management. Lecture, discussion, and laboratory.
Prerequisites: 184 and BIOL 212, or consent of instructor. 4 credits.

HHPA-387  PERFORMANCE ENHANCEMENT FOR THE INJURED ATHLETE

Relationship between the behavioral sciences and factors important to prevention of injuries and rehabilitation of injured athletes. Predisposing factors in injuries, coping strategies, pain perception and control, and behavior modification in injury rehabilitation.
Prerequisites: 184 and PSYC 181. 2 credits.

HHPA-388  ELEMENTARY HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION METHODS

Planning for and teaching health and physical education activities at the elementary school level. Managing, evaluating, and giving feedback to elementary learners. Exposure to resources and practice in delivery of comprehensive school health content areas: locomotor and non-locomotor movement experiences, rhythmic activities, manipulative skills, fitness activities, movement concepts, and appropriate elementary sports skills.
Prerequisite: EDUC 150 and sophomore standing. 3 credits.

HHPA-389  TOPICS IN ATHLETIC TRAINING

Emphasis on contemporary issues in athletic training. Topics include organization and administration of athletic training, legalities, pharmacology, special populations, and medical practices in relation to the field of athletic training.
Prerequisite: 184 or consent of instructor. 2 credits.

HHPA-390  ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION

Emphasis on the nature of administration and management in sport and physical education within intramural, interscholastic, and intercollegiate athletic programs; principles and practices of organizational leadership, policy, politics, and power; practicalities of program development, management, and supervision; issues of law, risk management, professionalism, and ethics. 3 credits.

HHPA-395  EVALUATION OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION

Assessment and evaluation in physical education; evaluation of objectives, programs and student performance through a variety of assessment techniques.
Prerequisite: upper division standing or consent of instructor. 2 credits.

HHPA-397  INTRODUCTION TO RESEARCH AND ANALYSIS IN PHYSICAL ACTIVITY/HUMAN PERFORMANCE

Techniques for examining conducting, analyzing, and reporting research of Physical Activity and Human Performance; quantitative and qualitative analysis. Lecture and laboratory. Typically offered spring semester. 3 credits. (QR, MWI)

HHPA-410  GENDER ISSUES IN EDUCATION & SPORT

An overview of gender issues in education and sport, with special attention on understanding gender bias and evolving educative, legislative and legal efforts to overcome historic gender biases. 3 credits. (IS or US, WI)

HHPA-412  HUMAN ANATOMY II

Advance study of human gross anatomy. Seminar and laboratory with prosection of a human cadaver. Recommended for athletic training and exercise science majors, and students interested in health care professions. May be repeated once for credit with consent of instructor.
$60 lab fee.
Prerequisites: BIOL 212 and 213 or 390 (all with a grade of B or higher), and consent of instructor. 2 or 3 credits.

HHPA-421  ATHLETIC TRAINING PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE V: THERAPEUTIC MODALITIES

Therapeutic Modalities - Professional experience in athletic training and application of athletic training courses. Clinical field experience required.
$50 lab fee.
Prerequisites: BIOL 331, junior or senior standing, and consent of instructor. Offered fall. 3 credits.

HHPA-422  PLANNING & EVALUATION IN HEALTH EDUCATION

Principles of program planning, including needs assessment, health promotion planning models, intervention theories and approaches, elements of marketing, implementation strategies, and evaluation. Practical application of all aspects of the program planning process to address a selected health problem affecting groups.
Prerequisites: 180, junior standing, and Health Education major status, or consent of instructor. Offered fall. 3 credits. (MWI)

HHPA-425  SPORT IN AMERICAN SOCIETY

The impact of sports on American society and the social order. The cultural response to sports in this country and abroad. Offered spring. 3 credits. (IS)

HHPA-431  PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE VI: STRENGTH, CONDITIONING AND PROFESSIONAL PREPARATION

Professional experience in athletic training and application of athletic training courses. Clinical field experience required.
$50 fee.
Prerequisites: 421, junior or senior standing, and consent of instructor. Offered spring. 3 credits.

HHPA-439  PEER INSTRUCTION

Advanced study opportunity for outstanding students to assist faculty members in the classroom or laboratory. Focus on course content and pedagogy. May not be repeated for credit.
Prerequisites: application and consent of instructor. 1-3 credits. (Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory) (EL)

HHPA-440  PHYSIOLOGY OF EXERCISE

Study of the effects of acute and chronic physical activity upon human physiological process with an emphasis on endurance, fatigue, training and other factors related to physical performance and health. Lecture and discussion.
Prerequisites: 352 and BIOL 212, 213. Offered fall. 3 credits.

HHPA-441  SENIOR SEMINAR IN EXERCISE SCIENCE

Field or laboratory research on topics in Exercise Science. Library work and extensive written report; oral presentation required. Possibility for presentation at regional/national conferences, and/or publication.
$55 lab fee.
Prerequisites: 397 and senior status. Offered spring. 3 credits. (MWI)

HHPA-445  MOTOR LEARNING AND MOTOR DEVELOPMENT

An examination of fundamental motor learning principles and theory. Application of those principles toward physical education, coaching, and the therapeutic setting. Analysis of current motor developmental models and viewpoints.
Prerequisites: BIOL 212, 213; PSYC 101, and 183 or 186. 4 credits.

HHPA-452  BIOMECHANICS OF SPORT AND EXERCISE

Mechanical laws and principles applied to the human body; forms of motion, linear and angular kinematics and kinetics; quantitative and qualitative analysis of sport techniques. Lecture and laboratory.
$10 lab fee.
Prerequisite: 352. 3 credits.

HHPA-455  ADAPTED PHYSICAL EDUCATION

Principles and practices of adapted physical education emphasizing the nature and needs of exceptional persons. History, recent legislation, growth and developmental factors, assessments, and individualized education plans related to adapted physical education. Service project in the community serving special needs populations. 3 credits

HHPA-465  MENTAL AND SOCIAL VARIABLES IN SPORT & PERFORMANCE

Principles of the behavioral sciences applied to studying and enhancing human physical performance. Socialization, motivation, personality, anxiety and stress management, concentration and attention styles. Application to sport performance at all skill levels and to fitness, health, and rehabilitation. 3 credits.

HHPA-470  MENTAL HEALTH

Topics designed to lead students through a self-growth process. Lecture-discussion on individual personality traits, self concept, and learned defense mechanisms and coping devices. Offered spring. 2 credits.

HHPA-480  INDEPENDENT STUDY

Opportunity to pursue special interests, conduct research, or obtain work experience. Credit often dependent upon submission of a paper.
Prerequisite: departmental approval. 1-5 credits.

HHPA-482  APPLIED EXERCISE SCIENCE

The study of acute and adaptive physiological responses to exercise including: stress testing, electrophysiology, hemodynamics, cardiac rehabilitation, exercise prescription for an apparently healthy adult, risk factor identification and environmental influences. Emphasis in techniques of test administration, interpretation of data and safety.
$35 lab fee.
Prerequisites: 280, 365, 440, 440L, PSYC 101. 3 credits.

HHPA-485  COACHING AS A PROFESSION

The special needs and responsibilities of today's coach of intercollegiate and interscholastic athletic teams. Role playing, discussion, and application of methods and materials for today's coach. Planning a season, operating a budget, organizing a team, fund raising, problem solving, and developing personal skills in dealing with people.
$20 fee. Offered spring. 3 credits.

HHPA-487  INTERNSHIP

Practical experience delivering programs in athletic training, health, exercise science, or physical education. Opportunities in private organizations (YMCA, Health/Fitness Centers), corporate education or fitness programs, or public organizations (schools, correctional institutions, hospitals, day care centers). Open to advanced students who have completed prerequisites including requirements for entrance into a teacher education program, if applicable.
$60 fee (Section 02 only).
Prerequisites: senior standing, complete pre-application, and instructor approval. 1-10 credits, but maximum 5 credits count toward the major. (Satisfactory/ Unsatisfactory)

History

HIST-120  HISTORY OF WESTERN CULTURE I

The history, literature, and art of the Western world beginning with ancient cultures of Egypt and Mesopotamia and extending to modern times. Major emphasis on the history of the classical age of Greece and Rome, the rise of the medieval church, the Renaissance and Reformation, and the modern age of science and reason. 4 credits each semester. (VP or GP)

HIST-121  HISTORY OF WESTERN CULTURE II

The history, literature, and art of the Western world beginning with ancient cultures of Egypt and Mesopotamia and extending to modern times. Major emphasis on the history of the classical age of Greece and Rome, the rise of the medieval church, the Renaissance and Reformation, and the modern age of science and reason. 4 credits each semester. (VP or GP)

HIST-123  HISTORY OF WORLD CIVILIZATION II

The history of world civilizations from antiquity to the present, with topical emphases on politics, economics, and intellectual and cultural life. Emphasis on multicultural trends and global issues. 4 credits each semester. (VP or GP)

HIST-124  EAST ASIA BEFORE 1800

China, Japan, and Korea from earliest times to 1800. Topics include Chinese Confucian and Buddhist philosophy; the Japanese samurai; Korean family and social hierarchies; and developments in East Asian literature and art. 4 credits. (VP or GP)

HIST-126  INTRODUCTION TO EURASION CIVILIZATIONS I

Explores the history of eastern Europe and central Asia from the tenth century to the present. Major topics include conflict, trade, and cross-cultural encounters in Eurasia; agriculture, nomadic pastoralism, and urban development; the development of Orthodox Christianity, Islam, and other religious traditions; and the formation of states and empires, including Kievan Rus', the Mongol empire, the Russian empire, and the Soviet Union. Attention also to European travellers and exploration, and to the European image of the peoples, realms, and religions of Eurasia. 4 credits each semester. (VP or GP)

HIST-127  INTRODUCTION TO EURASIAN CIVILIZATIONS II

Explores the history of eastern Europe and central Asia from the tenth century to the present. Major topics include conflict, trade, and cross-cultural encounters in Eurasia; agriculture, nomadic pastoralism, and urban development; the development of Orthodox Christianity, Islam, and other religious traditions; and the formation of states and empires, including Kievan Rus', the Mongol empire, the Russian empire, and the Soviet Union. Attention also to European travellers and exploration, and to the European image of the peoples, realms, and religions of Eurasia. 4 credits each semester. (VP or GP)

HIST-144  EUROPE SINCE 1500

Europe from 1500 to present, shaped in part around the historical past of France, Austria, and England. 5 credits.

HIST-152  ENVIRONMENTAL HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES

Explores how humans have both thought about and interacted with the natural world throughout the history of the United States. Focus includes how the natural world/environment shaped historical events and available opportunities. Themes include how the natural world and natural resources shaped patterns of life in the United States, the evolution of thinking about the natural world, and attempts to alter the landscape, with consideration of the political consequences of these actions. 4 credits. (VP or US)

HIST-170  LATIN AMERICAN HISTORY AND POLITICS (CROSS-LISTED WITH MLSP 170)

See MLSP 170. Offered fall in Costa Rica. 3 credits.

HIST-213  COLONIALISM AND SLAVERY IN LATIN AMERICA

Explores the dynamics of Spanish and Portuguese imperialism in the Americas and the development of forced labor systems. Some consideration of the pre-Hispanic past but emphasis upon the interactions between indigenous peoples, Europeans, Africans, and their descendants between 1492-1810. 4 credits. (VP or GP)

HIST-214  INDEPENDENCE AND INEQUALITY IN LATIN AMERICA

Examines social/political change and conflict beginning with movements for political independence and concluding with recent developments. Topics include: agrarian transformation, economic development and underdevelopment, slave emancipation, gender hierarchies, urbanization and populism, social revolution, labor politics, international relations, and foreign intervention. 4 credits. (VP or GP)

HIST-215  REVOLUTIONS IN 20TH CENTURY LATIN AMERICA

A comparative analysis of the major revolutionary movements in Latin America during the twentieth century, especially those that seized power in Mexico, Bolivia, Cuba, and Nicaragua, seen alongside experiments in popular reform in other countries in the region and revolutionary movements that failed to seize state power. 5 credits. (VP or GP)

HIST-228  ANCIENT EGYPT

Ancient Egypt from the beginnings to the Arab Conquest with major emphasis on the dynastic and Hellenistic periods. Pharaohs and necropolis workers, priests and storytellers, ancient artists and modern archeologists. Some materials from ancient Mesopotamia. 3 credits. (VP)

HIST-230  ANCIENT GREECE

From Minoan-Mycenaean origins to Alexander and the Hellenistic world, with major emphasis on classical Athens. The rise of democracy and imperialism; epic and dramatic literature; historical, philosophical, and scientific thinking. 4 credits. (VP)

HIST-233  ANCIENT ROME

From the foundation of the city to the fall of the empire. Major emphasis on the late Republic and the Principate. Politicians and generals, matrons and slaves, poets and philosophers, pagans and Christians. 4 credits. (VP)

HIST-240  EUROPEAN HISTORY ON FILM

Introduction to the history of early 20th century Europe through the medium of film. Films selected cover a variety of European countries and historical themes, including war, nationalism, and political and sexual oppression. Offered January term. 4 credits. (CS or VP)

HIST-242  HISTORY OF ENGLAND TO 1707

Study of historical events that impacted England from prehistoric times to 1707. Invasions that defined "English" by the Early Modern period, Medieval English state formation, early English imperialism, impact of the Protestant Reformation, development of early constitutional democracy, emergence of Tudor and Stuart England as a major European state, and examination of life of common men and women of England during this historical period. 4 credits. (VP or GP)

HIST-248  EUROPE IN THE AGE OF THE FRENCH REVOLUTION

This course examines the political, social, and cultural transformations of Europe from the early eighteenth century to the end of the Napoleonic Wars in 1815. The course focuses on the Old Regime and the revolutionary upheaval in France, but attention is paid as well to the wider European contexts and consequences of the French Revolution. Topics covered include the theory and practice of absolute monarchy, the social structure of the Old Regime, the Enlightenment, the origins and dynamics of 1789, and the political and social impacts of the revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars. 4 credits. (VP or GP)

HIST-249  POLITICS AND CULTURE IN NINETEENTH- CENTURY EUROPE

European politics, society, and culture from end of Napoleonic wars in 1815 to outbreak of Great War in 1914. Particular focus on formation of modern political ideologies, construction of social and national identities, shifting notions of gender and sexuality, and interplay between art and politics. Offered spring of even-numbered years. 4 credits. (VP or GP)

HIST-250  GENODICE AND ETHNIC CLEANSING IN MODERN EUROPE

Exploration of ethnic cleansing and political mass murder in twentieth-century Europe. Particular emphasis on outlook and experiences of both perpetrators and victims, as well as on dilemmas of memory, justice, and reconstruction in aftermath of violence. 4 credits. (VP or GP)

HIST-267  INTRODUCTION TO US WOMEN'S HISTORY

Survey of U.S. women's history from the pre-contact period through the present. Emphasis on the diversity of women's experiences based on region, class, sexuality, race, and ethnicity. Course themes include: how understandings of proper gender roles fluctuated and with what consequences, the nature of women's work, women's participation in politics, and how medical knowledge (or lack thereof) critically shaped women's lives. Offered fall of even numbered years. 5 credits. (VP or US)

HIST-268  HISTORY OF NATURE AND POPULAR CULTURE IN THE US

Explores how changing forms of popular culture have influenced American ideas about nature. Topics include: how popular culture has depicted nature, has ascribed social lessons to nature, and has influenced Americans' relations with the natural world. Focus on how older literary forms made the leap to film and TV (especially via Hollywood and the movies of Walt Disney). Examines culture forms like zoos and animal theme parks that have emerged in the last century and how they too have influenced how Americans think about wildlife and the natural world. 4 credits (VP or US)

HIST-276  NATIVE AMERICAN HISTORY

Overview of Native American history from the pre-contact period to the present. Emphasis on the diversity of native peoples in North America, the consequences of contact with incoming Europeans, and the ways in which indigenous people adapted to centuries of rapid change. Themes include cultural contact and exchange, shifting race relations, changing federal policies, and Native peoples' resilience over time. 4 credits. (VP or US)

HIST-300  TOPICS IN ASIAN HISTORY

Focus on special areas of importance in Asia's complex and multifaceted history such as: Imperial China; Feudal Japan; the Islamic Middle East, 620 to 1945; the Vietnam War. May be repeated if topic differs.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or above. 4 credits. (VP or GP)

HIST-301  TOPICS IN EUROPEAN HISTORY

Focus on special areas of importance in Europes complex history such as: Victorian England, History of the Third Reich, and Military History of WWII. May be repeated if topic differs.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or above. 4 credits. (VP or GP)

HIST-303  TOPICS IN WORLD HISTORY

Focus on special areas of importance in history, with specific attention to global and/or comparative approaches, such as: History of the Atlantic World; Comparative Colonialisms: Gender, Empire, and Narrative; Introduction to the History of the Middle East.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or above. 4 credits. (VP)

HIST-310  HISTORY OF RELIGION OF THE MIDDLE EAST (CROSS-LISTED WITH RELS 310)

See RELS 310. 4 credits.

HIST-314  THE US-MEXICO BORDER REGION

Explores the historical experience of individuals and groups in the U.S.-Mexico border region. Overview of the Mexican colonial period and the historical background to the relationship between the United States and Mexico from the 19th century onward. Topics to be covered include the foundation of the border, border life and culture, labor issues, racial discrimination, immigration, border economics, the drug trade, environment, and the future of border relations.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or above. 4 credits. (VP or GP)

HIST-315  HISTORY OF MEXICO

Study of Mexican history, including Indian peoples, Spanish colonization, independence, war with the United States, the Porfiriato, the Revolution, and the modern era. Examination of social, cultural, political, economic, and diplomatic factors that contributed to the development of the Mexican people.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or above. 5 credits. (VP or GP)

HIST-318  HISTORY OF WOMEN IN LATIN AMERICA

Examination of the history of women in Latin America from the Conquest to the present. Emphasis on a series of concepts, institutions, and factors that have influenced the lives of Latin American women, and how women have reacted to and shaped these experiences. Special attention to the study of race and class, along with gender, as major categories of analysis.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or above. 4 credits. (VP or GP)

HIST-320  EMPIRE & AFTERMATH IN ASIA

Survey of indigenous kingdoms in east and southeast Asia. Experiences of colonial domination. Twentieth century nationalist and Communist resistance movements. Cold War superpower rivalry's aggravation of conflicts in Vietnam and other countries. Post-colonial search for stability, prosperity, and human rights.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or above. Offered spring of odd numbered years. 5 credits. (VP or GP)

HIST-322  GENDER AND SOCIAL HISTORY OF EAST ASIA

Historical development of Confucian, Buddhist, and other beliefs shaping conceptions of femininity, masculinity, and social status in China, Japan, Korea, and Vietnam. Effects of imperialism and globalization on diverse notions of progress and human rights.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or above. Offered spring of even numbered years. 5 credits. (VP or GP)

HIST-325  COLONIAL AND REVOLUTIONARY AMERICA

The foundations of the United States, from its colonial beginnings to the establishment of a national government. Native Americans, European exploration and colonization, African-Americans, cultural life, revolution, and government in the new nation.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or above. 5 credits. (VP or US)

HIST-333  MEDIEVAL WOMEN AND MEN

Study of medieval European women's letters, diaries, mystic visions, poems, and tales of love to explore the society and culture of medieval times, including views of gender and their impact on social organization and individual experience. Extensive comparisons with men's writings and material from medieval Japan.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or above. 4 credits. (VP)

HIST-335  THE CIVIL WAR IN BLACK AND WHITE

The rise of industrialism, examination of slave narratives, the Civil War as the central event in U.S. History. Significant attention to postwar race relations and socio-cultural life, including farm labor.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or above. 5 credits. (VP or US)

HIST-345  THE EMERGENCE OF MODERN AMERICA

Analyses of the crisis of the 1890s, the New Imperialism, corporate reconstruction of American capitalism, the Progressives, liberal internationalism, the "Roaring '20s," the Great Depression, the New Deal, and World War II.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or above. 5 credits. (VP or US)

HIST-353  HOW THE WEST FED THE UNITED STATES

Explores the history of what we eat, why, and how that has changed over time. Illuminates the critical role the U.S. West has played in the evolution of our national foodways. Topics include: the history of agriculture, the meat and fish processing industries, and the ethical and environmental issues surrounding where Americans have historically acquired their food.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or above. 4 credits (VP or US)

HIST-355  AMERICAN EMPIRE

Examination of major developments since World War II in politics, diplomacy, economics, and popular culture. Emphasis on the consequences flowing from the new American hegemony.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or above. 5 credits. (VP or US)

HIST-357  HISTORY OF AMERICAN LABOR

History of the changing nature of work and the working class from Colonial times to the present. Examination of labor unions and political movements of workers. Includes significant materials on women and minorities.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or above. 5 credits. (VP or US)

HIST-360  HISTORY OF MODERN BRITAIN

Study of the historical issues that have impacted the British Isles from 1700 to present. Includes development of Britain as industrial state, colonialism and imperialism, Britain at war, Celtic nationalism, and gender, race, and class in industrial society.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or above. Offered spring of odd-numbered years. 4 credits. (VP or GP)

HIST-361  MODERN ENGLAND

English social, cultural, political, and economic history from 1500 to the present, emphasizing institutional change in such areas of English life as government and education.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or above. 4 credits. (VP)

HIST-362  HISTORY OF IRELAND

Study of Ireland from prehistoric times to present. Includes major social, cultural, political, and theological beliefs which have shaped experience of the Irish people, with special consideration given to English colonization, Catholic identity, and the conflict between modernization and the retention of Celtic culture. Examines Irish immigration to North America, including motives and experiences of immigrants.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or above. Offered January term of odd-numbered years. 4 credits. (VP or GP)

HIST-364  MODERN GERMANY

German history from the formation of the Empire in 1871 to reunification in 1990. Particular emphasis is placed on the dilemmas of German nationhood and nationalism, and on the origins, structure, and consequences of Hitler's Third Reich.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or above. 5 credits. (VP or GP)

HIST-370  RACE AND MINORITY CULTURE IN THE US

Indian, Spanish-speaking, African-American, and Asian ethnic groups in United States history. Cross-cultural comparisons.
Prerequisite: sophomore standing or above. 5 credits. (VP or US or GP)

HIST-375  HISTORY OF BASEBALL

Baseball as a reflection of American society. Origins of the game, player unions, deadball era, Golden Age, racial integration, modern period. Includes biographical project and statistical analysis.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or above. 5 credits. Offered spring of odd numbered years. (VP or US)

HIST-377  THE SOVIET UNION

Soviet history from its beginnings in 1917 to the "real existing socialism" of the Brezhnev era. Central problems include the formation of the characteristic ideology, practices, and institutions of the Soviet state; the Communist aspiration to build a socialist society and create a new Soviet person; and the impact of the multinational structure of the Soviet state.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or above. 5 credits. (VP or GP)

HIST-400  HISTORY OF PEOPLES REPUBLIC OF CHINA

Analysis of Chinese history since 1949, with emphasis on political, ideological, institutional, socio-economic, and cultural developments in Chinese society, and China's changing role in international affairs.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or above. 4 credits.

HIST-463  MODERN FRANCE

French national history from 1500, with emphasis on the period from 1789 to the present. The French monarchy, social and intellectual stress in the 18th century, the Revolution and Napoleon, Romanticism and the development of social consciousness, French politics and statecraft in the modern world.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or above. 5 credits.

HIST-480  INDEPENDENT STUDY

Program of directed tutorial reading on some topic or problem within the discipline relating to the special interests of the student and supervised by a departmental faculty member. 1-5 credits.

HIST-485  SENIOR SEMINAR

The capstone course in the History curriculum. Examination of method, interpretation, and philosophy of history via major research project. Required for majors. 5 credits. (MWI)

HIST-487  INTERNSHIP: EXPERIENCES IN HISTORY

An experiential learning course offering practical experience in areas where the skills of research and writing and project management are in demand. Directed by faculty advisor with involvement and evaluation by an on-site supervisor. May be repeated for credit.
Prerequisite: approval of faculty advisor. 2-5 credits. (EL)

Inquiry Seminars

INQS-125  INQUIRY SEMINAR

Course descriptions are available in the currentonline catalog.

Interdepartmental Studies

IDST-007  COLLOQUIUM

Becoming a successful college student. A fall semester orientation to college in general and Linfield in particular, conducted by a faculty advisor for his or her advisees with the help of a peer advisor. Focus on the transition from learning in high school to learning in college, health issues in the college environment, the resources of the Linfield community, the process of making sound academic and career choices. Must be attempted by all fall semester first-time students. Graded Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory with no retake permitted.
$15 fee. 1 credit. (EL)

IDST-012  EXPERIENTIAL LEADERSHIP SEM

Seminar for students involved in any type of leadership position. Focus on learning styles, reflection on leadership experiences. Training for more effective leadership through application of skills and theories presented in course. Offered through the Office of College Activities. 1 credit. (EL)

IDST-031  INTERCULTURAL COMMUNICATION: DEPARTURE & REENTRY

This course is required of all who study at one of Linfields semesterabroad sites.1 credit. (EL)

IDST-040  PRE-NURSING SEMINAR

Overview of expectations of pre-nursing students on McMinnville campus, process of migration to Linfield nursing program, and nursing as career. Focus on self-awareness, career decision-making, learning skills, and success in nursing program. Offered spring. 1 credit.

IDST-050  CAREER EXPLORATION

A structured process for learning more about majors and careers. Development of personal career plans. Especially designed for students needing help in deciding on majors. Offered by the Office of Career Services. 2 credits. (EL)

IDST-052  CAREER PLANNING & PREPARATION

The transition from campus to career success. Goal-setting, decision-making, and job hunt preparation (resum writing, interview techniques, and job hunt strategies). For senior students. Offered by the Office of Career Services. 2 credits. (EL)

IDST-060  RESIDENT ADVISOR TRAINING

Skills and techniques required of residence hall staff members. Student personnel philosophy, student development theory, interpersonal skills evaluation. Offered by Student Services Residential Staff. 1 credit. (EL)

IDST-061  LEADERSHIP AND GREEK LETTER ORGANIZATION

In-depth study of Greek letter organizations and surrounding issues. Historical perspectives, community service, risk management, leadership skills. Offered through the Office of the Greek Advisor. 1 credit. (EL)

IDST-062  RESIDENT ADVISOR IN-SERVICE CLASS

For current residence life staff members only. Focus on pro-active leadership, community development, and use of campus resources in the residence halls. Issues faced by student staff members coordinating their own education with the needs of their residents. Offered through the Office of the Director of Housing. 1 credit. (EL)

IDST-080  PERSONAL SUCCESS SKILLS

Development of practical life skills in areas of: a) stress management and reduction; b) assertive communication and interpersonal effectiveness; and c) self-esteem development and depression/anxiety prevention. 2 credits. (EL)

IDST-095  LINFIELD CURRICULUM (LC) ARTIFACTS

IDST-099  ACADEMIC PATHWAYS

Self-assessment and development of strategies for succeeding in college-level academics. Topics include curricular planning, examination of skills, interests, and motivation, time management, and use of academic resources. Content covered through discussion, lecture, and activities. For reinstated and academic probation students only. 1 credit. (EL)

IDST-110  BRIDGE TO COLLEGE SKILLS

Introduction to academic life at Linfield College: instructor-student course expectations, classroom interactions, course terminology, email etiquette, and availability of learning resources. Development of facility in reading academic sources, note taking, synthesizing information, and using complex sentence structure to write academic reports, essays, and research papers. Building fluency in academic vocabulary, competence in classroom discourse and oral presentation skills.
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 4 credits.

IDST-210  OUTDOOR ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES: GEOPHYSICAL

On-site practice of outdoor skills appropriate to the season and the terrain in Oregons Cascade Mountains. May include climbing techniques, cross country and/or downhill skiing, map and compass use, shelter building, and food selection. Opportunities for study of geology, geophysical processes, and ecological balance. Focus on the development of self-confidence in coping with new problems and environments. Offered during Summer and January Terms.
Prerequisites: passing a pre-course physical and meeting instructors performance requirements, MATH 105 or equivalent, or consent of instructor. 4 credits.

IDST-211  AN OVERVIEW OF CAREERS IN THE HELPING PROFESSIONS

Overview of professions in the social and human services including social work, psychology and related fields. Professional roles and settings; educational, supervision and licensure requirements; ethical and legal standards; skill bases and typical career paths. A brief history of social services. Experiential in nature with guest speakers and field trips. 3 credits.

IDST-270  TOPICS IN LATIN AMERICA: ARTS/ 18MANITIES

Field-based course taught in Latin America with a national and regional emphasis on art and humanities. Includes an emphasis on the pre-conquest, mestizo, indigenous, and contemporary arts and humanities, using field trips and relevant studio and written practices to assist students in exploring these issues. May include courses focusing on historical images of Mexican art, the study of folklore and mythology, local and regional literature, historical and regional music. May be repeated once for credit with different content. 4 credits. (IS or VP or GP)

IDST-271  TOPICS IN LATIN AMERICA: ARTS/ HUMANITIES

Field-based course taught in Latin America with a national and regional emphasis on art and humanities. Includes an emphasis on the pre-conquest, mestizo, indigenous, and contemporary arts and humanities, using field trips and relevant studio and written practices to assist students in exploring these issues. May include courses focusing on historical images of Mexican art, the study of folklore and mythology, local and regional literature, historical and regional music. May be repeated once for credit with different content. 4 credits. (IS or VP or GP)

IDST-274  TOPICS IN LATIN AMERICA: SOCIETY/CULTURE

Field-based course taught in Latin America with a national and regional emphasis on social and cultural life. Includes an emphasis on the historical nature of current sociocultural organization, with use of field trips to assist students in exploring these issues. May include courses in linguistics, cultural anthropology, sociology, economics and history. May be repeated once for credit with different content. 4 credits. (IS or VP or GP)

IDST-275  TOPICS IN LATIN AMERICA: SOCIETY/CULTURE

Field-based course taught in Latin America with a national and regional emphasis on social and cultural life. Includes an emphasis on the historical nature of current sociocultural organization, with use of field trips to assist students in exploring these issues. May include courses in linguistics, cultural anthropology, sociology, economics and history. May be repeated once for credit with different content. 4 credits. (IS or VP or GP)

IDST-280  PRACTICES IN COMMUNITY INTERACTION

Observation of and participation in communal as well as family traditional activities such as town festivities, family gatherings, religious celebrations, meal preparation. Acquisition of skills to interact with members of diverse ethnic communities. Required participation in the Oaxaca program. Applicable for the Spanish minor or major. 2-3 credits.

IDST-281  INDEPENDENT RESEARCH IN SAN RAMON, COSTA RICA

For students studying abroad in Costa Rica. Offered fall. 2 credits

IDST-285  SERVICE LEARNING PRACTICUM

Interdisciplinary activity providing opportunity to partner closely with communitybased project or program with supervised academic reflection, integration, and application. Active participation in civic service experiences that applies hands-on experience, knowledge, and skills to local, national, or international communities and organizations. Includes a minimum of 40 hours of service with a community partner. May be repeated once for credit. 2-4 credits.

IDST-287  CAREER EXPLORATION INTERNSHIP

Internships specifically devoted to career exploration. Open to all students. Offered by the Office of Career Services.
Prerequisite: approval of the Office of Career Services. 2-5 credits. (EL)

IDST-387  INTERDISCIPLINARY REGIONAL INTERNSHIP

Internship opportunities with regional organizations that provide an interdisciplinary focus for students. Interdisciplinary seminar integrates their experiences. May be repeated for credit.
Prerequisite: approval of departmental internship supervisor. 2-5 credits (EL)

Mass Communication

MSCM-011  NEWSPAPER PRACTICES

Application of journalistic skills through work onthe student newspaper.1 credit (EL)

MSCM-012  BROADCAST PRACTICES

Training and practice in radio announcing.Introduction to radio and television programming,ratings, newscasts and technologies. Requireswork at KSLC-FM.1 credits (EL)

Majors who enroll in MSCM 111 and 112 receive letter grades; non-majors enroll under MSCM 011 and 012 and receive Satisfactory/ Unsatisfactory grades.

MSCM-111  NEWSPAPER PRACTICES

Application of journalistic skills through work onthe student newspaper. For Mass Communicationmajors.1 credit

MSCM-112  BROADCAST PRACTICES

Training and practice in radio announcing.Introduction to radio and television programming,ratings, newscasts and technologies. Requireswork at KSLC-FM. For Mass Communication majors.1 credit

MSCM-114  MASS COMMUNICATION TOOLS

Introduction to equipment, software and techniques with which modern mass communicators need to be familiar. For majors and those who intend to be majors. Recommended to be taken in the sophomore year. Offered fall and spring most years. 1 credit.

MSCM-150  INTRODUCTION TO MASS COMMUNICATION

History, theory, technologies, and practice of the mass media in the United States. Emphasis on newspaper, magazine, book, recording, broadcasting, film, Internet-based media, advertising, and public relations industries at an introductory level. 3 credits. (IS or US)

MSCM-175  INTRO TO MEDIA WRITING

Writing for a media audience. Emphasis on grammar, punctuation, spelling, style, and sentence and paragraph structure. Laboratory work on deadline. Newswriting and copyediting skills, interviewing. Introduction to advanced writing and reporting techniques.
$15 lab fee.
Prerequisites: keyboard proficiency and consent of instructor. 4 credits. (WI)

MSCM-187  MASS COMMUNICATION CAREER PREPARATION

Training and preparation for internships and careers in the mass communication fields. Preparation of a resume, cover letter and portfolio. Practice and preparation for interviews and networking. Research skills pertinent to searching for internships and jobs. For Mass Communication majors and minors.
Prerequisites: 150 and INQS 125, or consent of instructor. Offered fall semester. 1 credit.

MSCM-275  INFORMATION GATHERING

Survey of research strategies, methods, techniques and sources; process of evaluating, preparing and presenting information. Includes personal observation, interviewing, documentary and database searches.
Prerequisite: 175. 4 credits.

MSCM-320  VISUAL COMMUNICATION: PRINT

Principles and practices of design and layout for magazines, newspapers, and other mass media. Introduction to printing processes, typography, and the graphic arts.
$25 lab fee.
Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 4 credits.

MSCM-322  VISUAL COMMUNICATION: PHOTOGRAPHY

Principles and current practices of visual reporting. Emphasis on photography in a digital age. Exposure to historical, ethical, legal and cultural aspects of photojournalism.
$45 lab fee.
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Offered alternate years. 4 credits.

MSCM-325  VISUAL COMMUNICATION: VIDEO

Theoretical and applied approach to effective communication in a visual medium. Concepts of a visual composition, continuity, time compression, and other critical videography and editing concepts. Basic scriptwriting and lighting concepts. Introduction to various video genres, such as single camera newsgathering, public service announcements and master shot style of videography. Discussion of legal and ethical responsibilities of shooting and editing video.
$25 lab fee.
Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 4 credits.

MSCM-327  INTRODUCTION TO FILM (CROSS-LISTED WITH ENGL 327)

The tools of visual literacy. Responding to and evaluating cinema as art and as mass communication. The vocabulary of film-making and film criticism. Sample topics: genre analysis, directorial study, international film industry, film narrative. In cases where topics differ, may be repeated once for credit.
$20 lab fee.
Prerequisite: INQS 125. 4 credits.

MSCM-329  VISUAL COMMUNICATION: CONVERGENT

Critical analysis of the Internet as a communication medium shaped by intersecting and often conflicting cultural, social, economic, technological, ethical and legal imperatives. Applied experience building an effective Web site that reflects audience needs, effective communication of content in a digital environment and in-depth usability testing to evaluate message effectiveness.
$20 lab fee.
Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 4 credits.

MSCM-333  MASS MEDIA AND SOCIETY

The effects American mass media and society have on each other from theoretical, practical, and ethical perspectives. Consideration of significant, timely social issues and concerns.
Prerequisite: INQS 125. 4 credits.

MSCM-335  MASS COMMUNICATION ETHICS

Structures, concerns, and issues in mass communication and mass media industries, including responsibility, confidentiality, privacy, attribution, objectivity, conduct codes, accountability, and the public interest.
Prerequisite: INQS 125. 4 credits. (UQ)

MSCM-337  MASS MEDIA AND THE LAW (CROSS-LISTED WITH POLS 337)

Legal, regulatory, and ethical issues involving print and broadcast media and the Internet, including libel, obscenity, invasion of privacy, shielding of sources, freedom of the press, copyright, and government regulation.
Prerequisite: INQS 125. 4 credits.

MSCM-340  MASS MEDIA AND POPULAR CULTURE

The role of the mass media in the origins, development, and dissemination of American popular culture. Consideration of elite critiques of popular culture. Analysis of popular cultural manifestations in films, television, comic books, recorded music, and other media.
Prerequisite: INQS 125. 4 credits.

MSCM-345  MASS MEDIA, POLITICS AND PUBLIC OPINION CROSS-LISTED WITH POLS 345)

The role of the mass media in shaping and changing American public opinion and in the political and electoral processes. Examination of the links between mass media and government, and between the media and the individual citizen. Explorations of the interactions between media and attitudes, agendas, and behaviors. Focus on presidential and congressional election campaigns.
Prerequisite: INQS 125. 4 credits.

MSCM-347  PRINCIPLES OF PUBLIC RELATIONS

Development and role of public relations in the mass communication discipline and professions. The contributions of mass communication, public opinion and persuasion theories to public relations. The importance of ethics and social responsibility in practice. Public relations research techniques, planning, strategic analysis and application in a variety of situations and organizations, including government, corporate, and not-for-profit.
Prerequisite: INQS 125. 4 credits.

MSCM-349  PRINCIPLES OF ADVERTISING

Introduction to field of advertising and its importance to mass communication. Research techniques, strategic planning, audience segmentation, creative development, media planning, implementation and evaluation of advertising effectiveness. Analysis of social effects of advertising, what makes an ad effective, and importance of ethics and social responsibility in advertising.
Prerequisite: 150 or consent of instructor. 4 credits.

MSCM-350  HISTORY OF FILM

The development of film as a medium of communication, an art form, and a cultural phenomenon, from 1895 to the present. Emphasis on American film and the Classical Hollywood period, with comparative study of other national film industries. Screenings of films in conjunction with lectures and discussion.
Prerequisite: INQS 125. 4 credits.

MSCM-370  PUBLIC RELATIONS WRITING

Intermediate-level laboratory and field course creating and producing written materials used in public relations, including news releases, public service announcements, brochures, newsletters and speeches.
$15 lab fee.
Prerequisite: 275. 4 credits. (MWI)

MSCM-375  REPORTING

Intermediate-level field experience course emphasizing story ideas, sources, ethics, and legal questions. Reporting for local paper, lectures and discussions, consultations.
$15 lab fee.
Prerequisite: 275. 4 credits. (MWI)

MSCM-378  ELECTRONIC MEDIA WRITING

Theory and practice of writing for radio, television, and other electronic media. Critical analysis of one's role as both a producer and consumer of media content. Emphasis on news reporting for radio and television, including work at campus radio station.
$15 lab fee.
Prerequisite: 275. 4 credits. (MWI)

MSCM-430  HISTORY OF MASS COMMUNICATION

The role of the mass media in the development of the human culture. Includes history of newspapers, books, radio, video, film, advertising, and public relations and their interactions with political, social, and cultural institutions.
Prerequisites: 175 and senior standing, or consent of instructor.. 4 credits. (VP)

MSCM-447  PUB RELATIONS RES & CAMPAIGNS PUBLIC RELATIONS RESEARCH & CAMPAIGNS

Advanced seminar combining theory, research, and practice in public relations. Development of a public relations program. Design, implementation, and analysis of social science research; public relations, mass communication, and public opinion theory; application of public relations principles, strategies, and techniques through experiential learning.
Prerequisites: 347, and 275 or 320, and instructors consent. 4 credits.

MSCM-450  SEMINAR: MASS COMMUNICATION RESEARCH METHODS

Examination of various tools and methods available to the communication scholar to answer theoretical questions. Quantitative and qualitative methods evaluated and utilized. 3 credits.

MSCM-475  FEATURE WRITING

Advanced reporting seminar with an emphasis on writing skills. Emphasis varies among news analysis, feature writing, editorial writing, and review and criticism.
$15 lab fee.
Prerequisites: 275 and consent of instructor. 4 credits. (MWI)

MSCM-480  INDEPENDENT STUDY

Advanced study in fields of mass communication.
Prerequisite: consent of department chair. 1-5 credits.

MSCM-485  SENIOR SEMINAR

Intensive examination of recurrent and new issues in mass communication.
Prerequisite: senior standing. 4 credits.

MSCM-487  INTERNSHIP

Supervised work at a newspaper, magazine, broadcast station, or public relations, marketing or advertising agency or department, or other approved media outlet. Arranged through the department by individual students. May be taken multiple times up to a cumulative 4 credits.
Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 1-4 credits.

MSCM-490  SENIOR THESIS

Advanced study resulting in a research paper representing a significant contribution to the student's discipline.
Prerequisites: senior standing and consent of department chair. Offered fall semester. 3 credits.

Mathematics

MATH-120  INTRO TO GAME THEORY

Topics in economic game theory including two-person zero-sum games, Prisoner's Dilemma, n-person competitive and cooperative games. Focus on concepts of strategy, fairness, cooperation and defection, utility and individual rationality. The social impact of individual choices.
Prerequisites: High school algebra I and geometry, or equivalent. Offered fall of even-numbered years. 3 credits. Not for General Science majors. (QR)

MATH-125  INTRODUCTION TO VOTING THEORY

Study of voting and elections from a mathematical perspective; examination of preferential voting systems with focus on axioms of fairness; weighted voting systems and indices of power; methods of apportionment, paradoxes, and the Electoral College.
Prerequisites: High school algebra and geometry, or equivalent. Offered fall of oddnumbered years. 3 credits. Not for General Science majors. (QR)

MATH-130  PROBLEM SOLVING

Mathematical problem solving; understanding the problem, devising a plan to solve the problem, implementing the plan, verifying and communicating the solution. Specific problem strategies and types of problems for which they are appropriate. Emphasis on communication, collaboration and problem-solving strategies.
Prerequisites: High school algebra I and geometry, or equivalent. Offered spring of odd-numbered years. 3 credits. Not for General Science majors. (QR)

MATH-135  MATHEMATICS FOR ELEMENTARY TEACHER I

The mathematics of the elementary school. Problem solving, sets and logic, number and numeration systems, whole number operations and their properties, patterns among natural numbers, the art of guessing, fractions, decimals, ratios and portions, integers, rational and irrational numbers, and the use of calculators.
Prerequisite: MATH 105 or equivalent. 4 credits. May be applied to General Science major only with approval of the department chair. (QR)

MATH-136  MATH FOR ELEMENTARY TEACHERS II TEACHERS II

A continuation of 135. Collection and treatment of data, concepts of probability, measurement, spatial concepts including one, two and three dimensional shapes, congruence, similarity, transformations, graphic and computers including the use of Logo.
Prerequisite: 135 or consent of instructor. 4 credits. May be applied to General Science major only with approval of the department chair.

MATH-150  PRECALCULUS

Topics in algebra and trigonometry beyond those covered in the second course in high school algebra. Emphasis on concepts, structures and technical competence. Solutions of algebraic equations and inequalities; functions and graphs; exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions; elementary plane analytic geometry.
Prerequisite: 105, or high school algebra I and II and geometry, or equivalent. 5 credits.

MATH-170  CALCULUS I

Differential and integral calculus of real functions of one variable. Differentiation, the chain rule, the mean-value theorem, the fundamental theorem, limits and continuity, curve sketching. Integration by substitution. Application of the derivative and integral to physics and geometry.
Prerequisite: 150 or equivalent. 5 credits.

MATH-175  CALCULUS II

A continuation of Calculus I to include further techniques of integration, Taylor approximations, sequences and series. Plane analytic geometry, including arc length.
Prerequisite: 170 or equivalent. 3 credits.

MATH-200  VECTOR CALCULUS

Functions of several variables; differentiability and continuity; arc length and differential geometry; Taylor's formula; extrema and Lagrange multipliers; multiple integration, line and surface integrals; the theorems of Green, Gauss and Stokes.
Prerequisite: 175 or equivalent. 5 credits.

MATH-210  ORDINARY DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS

First-order equations, including separation of variables and integrating factors; second-order linear equations, including nonhomogeneous techniques, Laplace transforms and power series methods; linear systems, including eigenvalue methods and matrix exponentials; applications to mechanics, physics, chemistry, biology, and economics.
Prerequisite: 175 or equivalent. Offered spring. 4 credits. (QR)

MATH-220  INTRODUCTION TO PROOFS

Fundamental concepts in abstract mathematics with an emphasis on learning to write mathematical proofs. Topics include logic, sets, relations, functions, proof by contradiction, proof by contrapositive, and mathematical induction.
Prerequisite: 170 or consent of instructor. Offered January term. 3 credits.

MATH-230  DISCRETE MATHEMATICS

Topics in the general area of discrete mathematical structures including sets, logic, relations, functions, induction, matrices, basic enumeration, graphs, and Boolean algebra.
Prerequisite: 170 or equivalent. Offered fall. 4 credits.

MATH-250  LINEAR ALGEBRA

Matrix theory and linear algebra, including real and complex vector spaces, linear transformations and their matrices, systems of linear equations, determinants, similarity, eigenvalues, symmetric and Hermitian matrices.
Prerequisite: 170 or equivalent. 4 credits.

MATH-280  MATHEMATICAL MODELING EXPERIENCE

Participation in the Mathematical Contest in Modeling sponsored by the Consortium for Mathematics and its Applications. Experience solving real world problems using mathematical methods. Formal presentation of project results. May be repeated for credit.
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Offered spring. 1 credit.

MATH-290  HISTORY OF MATHEMATICS

Topics in the development of mathematics from ancient times to present.
Prerequisites: 175 and INQS 125 or consent of instructor. Offered spring of evennumbered years. 3 credits.

MATH-310  NONLINEAR ODE'S & DYNAMIC SYSTEMS

Nonlinear differential equations from a dynamical systems approach. Scalar autonomous equations; elementary bifurcations; linear systems and canonical forms; planar autonomous systems; stability near equilibria including Liapunov functions; periodic orbits and the Poincare-Bendixson theorem; Lorenz equations, chaos and strange attractors; one-dimensional maps including the logistical map.
Prerequisites: 200 and 210, or consent of instructor. Offered fall of even-numbered years. 3 credits. (QR)

MATH-320  HIGHER GEOMETRY

Geometry as a body of theory developed logically from a given set of postulates. Euclid's definitions and postulates; independence, consistency, and completeness, finite axiomatic systems; modern incidence results of the circle and triangle; duality in synthetic projective geometry; Cartesian and homogeneous coordinates; transformations of the plane.
Prerequisite: 250 (may be taken concurrently). Offered fall of even-numbered years. 4 credits.

MATH-330  COMBINATORICS

Combinatorial theory with focus on techniques of enumeration. Topics include generating functions, recurrence relations, inclusion-exclusion, pigeonhole principle. Advanced topics selected from posets, lattices, Polya counting, difference sequences, Stirling numbers, and Catalan numbers.
Prerequisites: 175 and at least one of 220, 230, or 250. Offered spring of odd-numbered years. 3 credits.

MATH-340  PROBABILITY AND STATISTICS I

Discrete and continuous random variables; descriptive statistics of a single random variable; the Central Limit Theorem; applications of confidence intervals and hypothesis testing; linear regression.
Prerequisite: 175. Offered fall. 4 credits. (QR)

MATH-350  NUMBER THEORY

Properties of the integers. Divisibility, prime numbers, congruence. Chinese Remainder Theorem, Wilson's Theorem, Euler's Theorem. Emphasis on writing proofs in the context of number theory; mathematical induction.
Prerequisite: 220, 230, or 250. Offered fall of even-numbered years. 3 credits.

MATH-360  OPERATIONS RESEARCH

Mathematical methods of examining allocation problems; formulation and solution of linear programming problems, simplex method, and duality; additional topics may include game theory, queuing models, dynamic programming, and/or Markov chains.
Prerequisites: 200, 250. Offered spring of odd-numbered years. 3 credits. (QR)

MATH-370  ELEMENTARY ANALYSIS

The analysis of real-valued functions; sequences including Cauchy sequences; limits and continuity including uniform continuity; differentiation, the mean value theorem and Taylor's Theorem; the Reimann integral and the fundamental theorem of calculus.
Prerequisites: 175, at least one of 220, 230, or 250, and INQS 125. 3 credits. (MWI)

MATH-380  NUMERICAL ANALYSIS

Numerical analysis involving mathematical and statistical methods, use of interactive mathematical software to solve such problems. Topics include: numerical solution of non-linear equations, numerical solution of systems of equations, numerical differentiation and integration, numerical solution of ordinary differential equations, interpolation, curve fitting, analysis of errors.
Prerequisites: 200, and 250 (may be taken concurrently). Offered spring of odd-numbered years. 4 credits.

MATH-400  TOPICS IN MATHEMATICS

Selected topics not regularly offered at Linfield. 1-5 credits.

MATH-410  PARTIAL DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS

Fourier series and the methods of separation of variables; Sturm-Liouville problems; Green's functions; the method of characteristics; Laplace, heat and wave equations, and selected applications.
Prerequisites: 200, 210. Offered fall of odd-numbered years. 3 credits.

MATH-420  TOPOLOGY

Basic topics in point set topology. Product, quotient and subspace topologies; metric spaces; closed sets and limit points; connectedness; compactness; the separation axioms; introduction to fundamental group and covering spaces.
Prerequisites: 200 and at least one of 220, 230, or 250. Strongly recommended: 370. Offered fall of odd-numbered years. 3 credits.

MATH-430  GRAPH THEORY

Topics in graph theory including trees, bipartite graphs, Eulerian and Hamiltonian graphs, matchings, connectivity, coloring, planar graphs. Advanced topics selected from Ramsey theory, pebbling, competitive coloring, and matroids.
Prerequisite: 220, 230, or 250. Offered spring of even-numbered years. 3 credits.

MATH-440  PROBABILITY & STATISTICS II

Multivariate probability distributions; functions of random variables; point estimators; maximum likelihood estimators; theory of hypothesis testing and power; method of least squares.
Prerequisites: 200, 340. Offered spring of even-numbered years. 3 credits.

MATH-450  ABSTRACT ALGEBRA

Basic algebraic structures; groups, rings, and fields. Cosets, normal subgroups, factor groups, ideals, factor rings, polynomial rings. Homomorphisms and isomorphisms.
Prerequisite: 220, 230, or 250. Offered fall of odd-numbered years. 4 credits.

MATH-460  COMPLEX ANALYSIS

Complex numbers and functions; the complex derivative; complex integration; Taylor and Laurent series; residue theory; conformal mapping. Selected applications.
Prerequisites: 200, 370. Offered spring of odd-numbered years. 4 credits.

MATH-470  REAL ANALYSIS

Topology of Rn ; analysis of functions from Rn to Rm ; inverse function theorem; implicit function theorem; measure theory and Lebesgue integration; introduction to Hilbert space theory.
Prerequisites: 200, 250, and 370. Offered spring of even-numbered years. 4 credits.

MATH-480  INDEPENDENT STUDY

Study of selected topics under an instructor's guidance. For advanced mathematics majors with a high degree of self-reliance. Periodic written and oral reports and, in most cases, a comprehensive final paper. 1-5 credits.

MATH-485  SENIOR SEMINAR

Department capstone course. Examination of the nature of mathematics and its role within the liberal arts. Focus on reading current mathematics and presenting results.
Prerequisites: 370 and senior standing, or consent of instructor. Offered spring. 1 credit.

Modern Language - Chinese

MLCH-030  CHINESE CONVERSATION PRACTICE

Chinese phonetics and Pinyin Romanization system. Development of vocabulary, structures and strategy essential to basic comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. Situation-based practice in asking and answering questions; identifying and describing people and things; expressing wants and needs. Four class hours per week. Offered fall. 4 credits.

MLCH-101  ELEMENTARY CHINESE I

Chinese phonetics and Pinyin Romanization system.Development of vocabulary, structures and strategyessential to basic comprehension, speaking,reading, and writing. Situation-based practice inasking and answering questions; identifying anddescribing people and things; expressing wants andneeds. Four class hours per week.Offered fall.4 credits

MLCH-102  ELEMENTARY CHINESE II

Continuation of 101. Practice in reading, writing, and talking about activities, making plans and inquiries, expressing wants and needs, and discussing experiences. Acquisition of vocabulary, sentence structures and patterns at an elementary level. Four class hours per week.
Prerequisite: 101 or placement test. Offered spring. 4 credits.

MLCH-201  INTERMEDIATE CHINESE I

Review of skills and structures learned in 101 and 102. Emphasis on building a larger practical vocabulary and using it to describe and narrate. Acquiring new knowledge of grammar, sentence patterns and structures at an intermediate level. Four class hours per week.
Prerequisite: 102 or placement test. Offered fall. 4 credits.

MLCH-202  INTERMEDIATE CHINESE II

Continuation of 201. Training in the areas of reading, speaking, writing, and comprehension at an intermediate level. Study in narration of present, past, and future events. Writing exercises including compositions on various topics. Preparation for living for an extended period in China. Four class hours per week.
Prerequisite: 201 or placement test. Offered spring. 4 credits.

MLCH-212  SURVEY OF EAST ASIAN LITERATURE

Survey of major works of East Asian literature. Readings in a variety of genres and periods on themes of the family in East Asia and the representation of nature in East Asian literature. Introduction to works from China, Korea, Japan and Vietnam in a variety of genres including fiction, poetry and drama. All works read in English translation. Offered spring. 3 credits. (CS or GP)

MLCH-250  INTRODUCTION TO EAST ASIAN FILM

Introduction to the rich history of East Asian film. Examines the development of cinema in China, South Korea, Taiwan and Japan from early twentieth century to present. Acquisition of tools of visual literacy in conjunction with inquiry into the cinematic representation of major themes. Screenings of films, student presentations, lectures, and discussions. Conducted in English. 4 credits (CS or GP)

Modern Language - French

MLFR-030  FRENCH CONVERSATION PRACTICE

1 credit (EL)


The courses offered in France (Aix, Angers, Marseille) and Senegal (Dakar) cover a wide array of subjects, from language (including French and Wolof), culture and literature, to history, art, anthropology, sociology, philosophy, political science, international relations, etc. Many of them may count as LCs. Detailed information is available from the French faculty.

MLFR-101  ELEMENTARY FRENCH I

Development of vocabulary, structures, and speaking/reading/writing strategies essential to basic language use. Students practice asking and answering questions; identifying, comparing, and describing people and things; expressing wants and needs; and discussing plans. Preparation for living in a French-speaking culture. Four class hours per week. ACTFL target: Novice High. Offered fall. 4 credits.

MLFR-102  ELEMENTARY FRENCH II

Continuation of 101. Continued practice in reading, writing, and talking about activities, making plans and inquiries, and expressing wants and needs. Some practice in narration of present, past, and future events. Four class hours per week. ACTFL target: Intermediate Low.
Prerequisite: 101. Offered spring. 4 credits.

MLFR-105  INTENSIVE ELEMENTARY FRENCH

An accelerated onesemester course that covers the material of 101 and 102. Satisfies language requirement for BA degree. For students with some previous experience in the language but not enough to enroll in 201, and for students with superior language-learning ability. Five class hours per week. ACTFL target: Intermediate Low. Offered fall. 5 credits.

MLFR-201  INTERMEDIATE FRENCH I

Review of skills and structures described in 101 and 102. Emphasis on building a large practical vocabulary and on using it to describe and narrate. Reading and aural exercises that include authentic materials; writing exercises that include narration, exposition and dialogue. Preparation for living for an extended period in a French-speaking culture. ACTFL target: Intermediate Mid.
Prerequisite: a grade of C or better in 102 or 105, or placement test. Offered fall. 4 credits.

MLFR-202  FRENCH CULTURE & FREE EXPRESSION

Continuation of 201, with strong emphasis on French oral and written expression through exploration of a contemporary novel, the current press, videos, and other materials selected from coverage of recent events in France. ACTFL Target: Intermediate Mid.
Prerequisite: a grade of C or better in 201 or placement test. Offered spring. 4 credits.

MLFR-211  INTRODUCTION TO FRENCH CIVILIZATION I

Introduction to the history and civilization of France from the early renaissance period (twelfth century) to the fall of the Monarchy. History of the constitution of a national identity through the analysis of salient political and artistic movements. Study of cultural achievements and contributions to the world; consideration of special questions inherent in dealing with other European neighbors and the world beyond. Sources include literature, historical and political writing. Conducted in English. Offered fall. 3 credits.

MLFR-212  INTRODUCTION TO FRENCH CIVILIZATION II

Introduction to the recent history and civilization of the Frenchspeaking countries from the revolution of 1848 to the present. Emphasis on the philosophical foundations of the French Republic, its evolution during the twentieth century, and the challenges that the Republican model had begun to encounter during the latter part of that century. Study of cultural achievements, artistic movements, and contributions to the world; consideration of special questions inherent in dealing with other European neighbors and the world beyond (colonialism); presentation of the Francophone world. Sources include literature, the visual arts, and contemporary historical and political writing. Conducted in English. Offered spring. 3 credits. (CS or VP or GP)

MLFR-215  LITERATURE AND SOCIETY: AN AFRICAN PERSPECTIVE

Discussion, in a historical perspective, of issues of race, religion, and the human in precolonial, colonial, and postcolonial Africa. Analysis of the categories of difference and otherness in postcolonial African thought. Conducted in English. Offered spring. 3 credits. (CS or IS)

MLFR-301  FRENCH COMPOSITION AND CONVERSATION I

Intensive practice in expository and narrative writing and in aural comprehension of video tapes. Discussion of a wide variety of topics based on literary selections. Speaking and writing practice involves hypothesizing, supporting opinions, making plans and functioning in unfamiliar situations. Review of grammar as a tool to improve writing. May be repeated once for credit with a different instructor and content. ACTFL target: Intermediate High.
Prerequisite: a grade of C or better in 202 or placement test. Offered fall. 4 credits. (MWI)

MLFR-302  INTRODUCTION TO FRENCH AND FRANCOPHONE STUDIES

Introduction to Francophone literatures and cultures with main emphasis on acquisition of techniques and tools to analyze recorded oral tradition, texts, and film as cultural artifacts from various Francophone countries. May be repeated once for credit with a different instructor and content. ACTFL target: Intermediate high.
Prerequisite: 301 or college equivalent. Offered spring. 4 credits. (CS or GP, WI)

MLFR-311  FRENCH CIVILIZATION I

Introduction to the major events and important periods of French history from the Middle Ages to 1789, including political, social, and artistic development which have marked French civilization. Examination of the way these historical periods have influenced life in contemporary France. Conducted in French.
Prerequisite: 302 or equivalent. Offered fall. 3 credits. (CS or VP or GP)

MLFR-312  FRENCH CIVILIZATION II

Examination of various aspects of French history and culture from 1789 to the present, including the structure of French society, its institutions, social categories, patterns of work, values, and attitudes. Study of the physical geography of France and its economic and social ramifications. Conducted in French.
Prerequisite: 302 or consent of instructor. Offered spring. 3 credits. (CS or VP or GP)

MLFR-350  TOPICS IN FRENCH LITERATURE

Study of selected topics in French literature through reading and discussion of major works. Study of literary genres and movements. Practice in literary analysis. Recent topics have included Contemporary Theater and Society, Atheism in the 21st Century French novel, Annie Ernaux's social autobiography, and The Bosnian War in Fiction. Conducted in French.
Prerequisite: 302 or consent of instructor. 4 credits (CS or GP).

MLFR-360  TOPICS IN FRENCH CIVILIZATION

Selected aspects of culture and cultural change that have been especially important in determining the nature of contemporary society associated with this language. Study and discussion of printed and broadcast sources from the various humanistic and social scientific fields. Recent topics have included Multiculturalism in Contemporary France, French Culture and Society through Films of the 1990s, and Contemporary France Through its Press. Conducted in French.
Prerequisite: 302 or consent of instructor. 3 credits. (GP or IS)

MLFR-480  INDEPENDENT STUDY

A flexible course suited to the needs of the individual. Reading and research on a specific topic.
Prerequisite: 302 and consent of instructor. 1-5 credits.

MLFR-485  SENIOR SEMINAR

Reading, discussion, and writing on individual literary and/or cultural topics which will vary. Culminates in the writing of a long research paper. Recent topics have included Literature of the Occupation (1940-1944), The Francophone African and Caribbean Novel, and a collaborative project on French contemporary society. Mandatory for all seniors majoring in French. Offered spring. 3 credits. (CS or GP, MWI)

Modern Language - Japanese

MLJP-030  JAPANESE CONVERSATION PRACTICE

1 credit (EL)

MLJP-101  ELEMENTARY JAPANESE I

Development of vocabulary, structures and speaking strategies essential to basic language use. Situation-based practice in asking and answering questions, identifying and describing things, shopping and asking directions. Practical use of katakana and hiragana syllabaries. ACTFL target: Novice Mid. Offered fall. 5 credits.

MLJP-102  ELEMENTARY JAPANESE II

Continuation of 101. Talking about activities, plans, and personal life, expressing wants and needs, basic conventions of social interaction with Japanese people, including appropriate use of formal and informal speech styles. Study of kanji characters with an emphasis on kanji most useful for daily life. ACTFL target: Novice High.
Prerequisite: 101 or placement test. Offered spring. 5 credits.

MLJP-106  ACCELERATED ELEMENTARY JAPANESE I

Accelerated, one-semester course equivalent to MLJP 101. For students with previous experience with the language, but not enough to enroll in MLJP 102. Situation-based practice in asking and answering questions, identifying and describing things, shopping, and asking directions. ACTFL target: Novice Mid.
Prerequisite: Placement test or consent of instructor. Offered fall. 3 credits.

MLJP-201  INTERMEDIATE JAPANESE I

Review of skills described in 101 and 102. Vocabulary, expressions, and structures for more complicated interactions in social, business, and home environments. Preparation for living in Japan. Continued study of kanji. Four class hours per week. ACTFL target: Intermediate Low.
Prerequisite: a grade of C or better in 102 or 106 or placement test. Offered fall. 5 credits.

MLJP-202  INTERMEDIATE JAPANESE II

Continuation of 201. Practice in obtaining and giving detailed information, problem solving and expressing opinions and emotions in culturally appropriate ways. Continued study of kanji. Four class hours per week. ACTFL target: Intermediate Mid.
Prerequisite: a grade of C or better in 201 or placement test. Offered spring. 5 credits.

MLJP-240  JAPANESE CULTURE TODAY

Selected aspects of culture and cultural change that have been especially important in determining the nature of today's Japanese society. Conducted in English. 3 credits. (GP)

MLJP-301  JAPANESE COMPOSITION AND CONVERSATION I

Vocabulary building and kanji for reading and discussion of a wide variety of topics, narrative and descriptive compositions, listening practice and enhancement of cultural competence through viewing of videotapes from Japanese network television. Three class hours per week. ACTFL target: Intermediate Mid.
Prerequisite: 202 or placement test. Participation in Linfield's study abroad program in Yokohama strongly recommended. 4 credits. (MWI)

MLJP-302  INTERMEDIATE JAPANESE CONVERSATION II

Enhancement of listening and conversational skills through situational role playing, watching the news, a television drama, and through in-class presentations. Three class hours per week. ACTFL target: Intermediate Mid.
Prerequisite: 202 or placement test. 3 credits. (MWI)

MLJP-309  INTERMED WRITTEN JAPANESE

Development of reading and writing skills through magazine articles and short stories designed for native speakers. Writing of synopses and brief opinion pieces. Two class hours per week. ACTFL target: Intermediate Mid.
Prerequisite: 202 or placement test. Participation in Linfield's Study Abroad Program in Yokohama strongly recommended. Concurrent enrollment in 302 and 309 is possible. 2 credits.

MLJP-350  TOPICS IN JAPANESE LITERATURE

A survey of representative works of Japanese literature in English translation. Readings reflect a variety of genres including fiction, poetry, and drama. No background in Japanese language is required.
Prerequisite: INQS 125. 3 credits. (CS or GP)

MLJP-360  TOPICS IN JAPANESE CIVILIZATION

Selected aspects of culture and cultural change that have been especially important in determining the nature of contemporary society. Study and discussion of printed and broadcast sources from the various humanistic and social scientific fields. Conducted in English. 3 credits. (GP)

MLJP-480  INDEPENDENT STUDY

A flexible course suited to the needs of the individual. Reading and research on a specific topic.
Prerequisites: 202 and consent of instructor. 1-5 credits.

MLJP-485  JAPANESE SENIOR SEMINAR

Examination and analysis of contemporary social and cultural issues in Japan and the ways in which traditional values affect contemporary culture. Utilizes both print and broadcast sources from various humanistic and social scientific fields. Substantial individual research project with topic drawn from Japanese social and cultural issues discussed in class. Conducted in Japanese.
$
Prerequisite: MDLA 380 or equivalent. Offered spring. 3 credits. (IS or GP, MWI)

Modern Language - Spanish

MLSP-030  SPANISH CONVERSATION PRACTICE

1 credit (EL)

MLSP-101  ELEMENTARY SPANISH I

Development of vocabulary, structures, and speaking/reading/ writing strategies essential to basic language use. Situation-based practice in asking and answering questions; identifying, comparing, and describing people and things; expressing feelings, wants and needs and discussing plans. Preparation for living in a Spanish-speaking culture. ACTFL target: Novice High. Offered fall. 4 credits.

MLSP-102  ELEMENTARY SPANISH II

Continued practice in reading, writing, talking about activities, making plans and inquiries, expressing wants and needs and discussing experiences. Some practice in narration of present, past and future events, and also in maintaining opinions. ACTFL target: Intermediate Low.
Prerequisite: 101 or placement test. A grade of C or higher is required to continue to 201. A grade lower than C requires a repeat of 105 to progress to 201. Offered spring. 4 credits.

MLSP-105  INTENSIVE ELEMENTARY SPANISH

An accelerated onesemester course that covers the material of 101 and 102, preparing students for intermediate-level work during the second semester. Satisfies language requirement for B.A. degree. For students with some previous experience in the language, but not enough to enroll in 201, and for students with superior language-learning ability. ACTFL target: Intermediate Low. A grade of C or higher is required to continue to 201. A grade lower than C means a repeat of 105. Offered fall and spring. 5 credits.

MLSP-170  LATIN AMERICAN HISTORY AND POLITICS (CROSS-LISTED WITH HIST 170)

Latin American history from the European, African, and American Indian origins to the present. Continuing social, economic, and political fixtures. Desire for change in the 20th century. Not for Spanish major or minor credit. Offered fall in Costa Rica. 3 credits.

MLSP-201  INTERMEDIATE SPANISH I

Review of skills and structures described in 101 and 102. Emphasis on building a large practical vocabulary, and on using it to describe, narrate, and start building connected discourse. Reading and aural exercises that use authentic materials; writing exercises that reflect real-world tasks. Preparation for living for an extended period in a Spanish-speaking culture. Four class hours per week. ACTFL target: Intermediate Mid.
Prerequisite: a grade of C or better in 102 or 105 or placement test. 4 credits.

MLSP-202  INTERMEDIATE SPANISH II

Continuation of 201. Four class hours per week. ACTFL target: Intermediate Mid.
Prerequisite: a grade of C or better in 201 or placement test. 4 credits.

MLSP-290  SPANISH FOR BILINGUAL AND HERITAGE LEARNERS

Exposure to Spanish language for native speakers of the language. Development of reading and writing skills at an advanced level; work on advanced structural concepts and expansion of vocabulary in various formal registers. May be repeated once for credit.
Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Offered fall. 3 credits. (WI)

MLSP-291  SPANISH FOR BILINGUAL AND HERITAGE LEARNERS

Exposure to Spanish language for native speakers of the language. Development of reading and writing skills at an advanced level; work on advanced structural concepts and expansion of vocabulary in various formal registers. May be repeated once for credit.
Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Offered fall. 3 credits. (WI)

MLSP-301  SPANISH COMPOSITION AND CONVERSATION I

Study of advanced grammatical structures, idiomatic expressions, and more precise vocabulary. Discussion of a broad range of political, social, cultural and personal topics based on reading material. Speaking practice includes making more precise descriptions, narrating past events, hypothesizing, expressing and supporting opinions and functioning in unfamiliar situations. In Spanish. ACTFL target: Intermediate High.
Prerequisite: a grade of C or better in 202 or placement test. 4 credits. (MWI)

MLSP-302  SPANISH COMPOSITION AND CONVERSATION II

Continuation of 301 with emphasis on more advanced grammar, vocabulary building, sentence connection, more informal and formal writing. Discussion of a broad range of political, social, cultural and personal topics based on reading material. Preparation of formal oral presentation. Reading and discussion of short novel. Recommended for students returning from Semester Abroad Program. In Spanish. ACTFL target: Advanced.
Prerequisite: A grade of C or better in 301, equivalent course abroad, or placement test. 4 credits. (MWI)

MLSP-311  SPANISH CIVILIZATION I: SPAIN

Study of the historical/ cultural background of peoples of Spain: intellectual and artistic achievements and contributions to the world from early beginnings to the present; their influence on the peoples they conquered in the new world; ethnic distinctions in Spain; traditions, religion, festivities, customs of the various ethnic groups of the Peninsula. In Spanish.
Prerequisite: 302 or consent of instructor. 3 credits.

MLSP-312  SPANISH CIVILIZATION II: HISPANIC AMERICA

Study of the historical background of Latin American peoples, before and after the European conquest of the continent. Analyses of the most relevant cultural aspects such as: art, music, religion, ritualistic life, festivities, beliefs, traditions, ethnic issues. In Spanish.
Prerequisite: 302 or consent of instructor. 3 credits. (IS or GP)

MLSP-350  TOPICS IN SPANISH LITERATURE

Study of selected topics in Spanish and Latin American literature through reading and discussion of major works. Study of literary genres and movements. Practice in literary analysis. Recent topics have included the Hispanic American Short Story, Peninsular Short Story, Spanish One-act Plays, Introduction to Spanish and Hispanic American Literature, The Modern Mexican Novel, and Latin American women authors and poetry. In Spanish. Repeatable for credit when the topic changes.
Prerequisite: 302 or completion of semester abroad or consent of instructor. 3 credits. (CS or GP)

MLSP-360  TOPICS IN HISPANIC CIVILIZATION

Selected aspects of culture and cultural change that have been especially important in determining the nature of contemporary societies associated with this language. Study and discussion of printed and broadcast sources from the various humanistic and social scientific fields. Course topics in recent years have included Historical, Feminine, and Mythological Figures in Latin American Cultures and Latin American film. Repeatable for credit when the topic changes. In Spanish.
Prerequisites: 302 and consent of instructor. 3 credits. (IS or GP)

MLSP-362  LATIN AMERICAN CULTURES THROUGH FILM

Study of cultural identity in film through the lens of gender, class and race. Focus on marginal groups in different societies from Latin America, individual and collective history. Inquiry into relevant historical periods of countries studied. Screenings of films, student presentations, lectures and discussion. In Spanish.
Prerequisites: 302 or consent of instructor. Offered spring. 4 credits. (IS or GP)

MLSP-485  SENIOR SEMINAR

Reading, discussion, and writing on cultural topics of the Spanish-speaking world, culminating in the writing of a senior thesis paper. Topics chosen while abroad in consultation with advisor. Mandatory for all seniors majoring in Spanish. 3 credits. (MWI)

Modern Languages - French

MLFA-230  INTRODUCTION TO AFRICAN STUDIES

Interdisciplinary introduction to African studies. Survey of main figures of African Studies with a particular attention to historical periods and geographic particularities, discussion of the relations between Africa and the African diaspora with an emphasis on the necessity to understand "Africans" in their proper human historical and international contexts. 4 credits. (CS or GP)

MLFA-240  MODERN AFRICAN THOUGHT

Critical analysis of tradition, colonial influences, and contemporary developments in modern African thought. Examination of the unique, sophisticated, and original conceptions of knowledge in African thought. Discussion of the particular character of an African philosophical/religious worldview through oral traditions, literature, and philosophy with a focus on African metaphysics. Conducted in English. 4 credits. (CS or GP)

MLFA-315  FRANCOPHONE AFRICAN CINEMA IN TRANSLATION

Critical examination of questions of representation and reality in Francophone Africa. Analysis of the image of Africa and Africans in Western media and film. Discussion, in a postcolonial perspective, of issues of race, religion, and gender in pre-colonial, colonial, and postcolonial African cinema. Re-thinking of traditional conceptions of Africa and the African subject. Analysis of the categories of difference and otherness in African cinema. Conducted in English. Offered January term. 4 credits (CS or GP)

MLFA-330  TOPICS IN AFRICAN CIVILIZATION

Survey of African history from prehistoric times to the present through literature and philosophy. Analysis of African civilizations with a focus on African social, cultural and political history. Study Africa in the ancient world, medieval Africa, the era of European colonialism, the rise of nationalism and independence movements, and contemporary Africa. Conducted in English. 4 credits (CS or GP)

MLFA-340  TOPICS IN AFRICAN LITERATURE

Explore topics in the areas of orature, literature, performance texts, film and/or other media produced in Africa. Identify authors, major themes, and major periods and genres in African literature. In-depth analysis of a particular author or a particular theme in African literature through the examination of the basic literary conventions of plot, character, setting, point of view, and theme. Conducted in English. 4 credits (CS or GP)

MLFA-486  SENIOR SEMINAR IN AFRICAN STUDIES

Analysis of a particular theme in Africana studies from multiple disciplinary perspectives. Reading and discussion of different material in African Studies. Selection of research topic by each student and writing of a major paper. Offered spring. 4 credits. (GP)

Modern Languages - German

MLGR-030  GERMAN CONVERSATION PRACTICE

1 credit (EL)

MLGR-101  ELEMENTARY GERMAN I

Development of vocabulary, structures, and strategy essential to basic comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. Situation-based practice in asking and answering questions; identifying, comparing and describing people and things; expressing wants and needs; and discussing plans. Preparation for living in a German-speaking culture. ACTFL target: Novice High. Offered fall and January. 4 credits.

MLGR-102  ELEMENTARY GERMAN II

Continuation of 101. Continued practice in reading, writing, and talking about activities, making plans and inquiries, expressing wants and needs and discussing experiences. Some practice in narration of present, past, and future events, and also in maintaining opinions. ACTFL target: Intermediate Low.
Prerequisite: 101 or placement test. Offered spring. 4 credits.

MLGR-105  INTENSIVE ELEMENTARY GERMAN

Accelerated one-semester course that covers material of MLGR 101 and 102. Satisfies language requirement for B.A. degree. For students with some previous experience in the language, but not enough to enroll in MLGR 201, and for students with superior language-learning ability. ACTFL target: Intermediate Low. Offered spring. 5 credits.

MLGR-201  INTERMEDIATE GERMAN I

Review of skills and structures described in 101 and 102. Emphasis on building a large practical vocabulary and on using it to describe and narrate. Reading and aural exercises that use authentic materials; writing exercises that reflect real-world tasks. Preparation for living for an extended period in a German-speaking culture. ACTFL target: Intermediate Mid.
Prerequisite: a grade of C or better in 102 or placement test. Offered fall. 4 credits.

MLGR-202  INTERMEDIATE GERMAN II

Continuation of 201; appropriate for intermediate students returning from Linfields semester abroad in Vienna. ACTFL target: Intermediate Mid.
Prerequisite: a grade of C or better in 201 or placement test. Offered spring. 4 credits.

MLGR-208  INTERMEDIATE CONVERSATION GERMAN

Practice in speaking through preparation of talks, skits, and other oral exercises; strong emphasis on vocabulary building. Recommended for those returning from overseas. 3 credits.

MLGR-212  INTRODUCTION TO GERMAN CIVILIZATION II

Introduction to the contemporary culture and civilization of the German-speaking countries. Study of cultural achievements and contributions to the world; consideration of special questions inherent in dealing with other European neighbors and the world beyond. Sources include literature, film, and contemporary historical and political writing. Conducted in English. Offered fall. 3 credits.

MLGR-240  GERMAN FILM AND SOCIETY

Study of the history and development of German film from the early twentieth century to the present. Includes, but is not limited to, history of German, Austrian, and Swiss cinema, film narrative, politics and film, image of Germans and Germany through film, and images of America in German film. Acquisition of tools of visual literacy in conjunction with inquiry into modern German culture through film. Screenings of films, student presentations, lectures and discussions. Conducted in English. Offered fall. 4 credits. (CS or GP)

MLGR-301  GERMAN COMPOSITION AND CONVERSATION I

Intensive practice in task-specific writing and in comprehension of a wide variety of native speech in audio and video tapes. Discussion of a broad range of political, social and personal topics. Speaking and writing practice involves hypothesizing, supporting opinions and functioning in unfamiliar situations. Development of skills in writing well-organized essays. Review of grammar as a tool to improve writing. ACTFL target: Intermediate High.
Prerequisite: a grade of C or better in 202 or placement test. Offered fall. 4 credits. (MWI)

MLGR-302  GERMAN COMPOSITION AND CONVERSATION II

Continuation of 301. Study of advanced syntax supports high-level writing tasks. ACTFL target: Intermediate High.
Prerequisite: 301 or placement test, or for advanced students returning from study abroad. Offered spring. 3 credits. (MWI)

MLGR-312  CONTEMPORARY GERMAN CIVILIZATION

Introduction to German culture and civilization; study of cultural achievements and contributions to the world. Emphasis on contemporary social and cultural developments on the German-speaking countries. In German. Offered spring. 3 credits.

MLGR-350  TOPICS IN GERMAN LITERATURE

Study of selected topics in German literature through reading and discussion of major works. Study of literary genres and movements. Practice in literary analysis. Recent topics have included Short Prose Fiction of the 19th Century, Society and Responsibility, and East/West Literature after 1945. In German. Repeatable for credit when topic changes. 3 credits. (CS or GP)

MLGR-360  TOPICS IN GERMAN CIVILIZATION

Selected aspects of culture and change important in determining the nature of contemporary German-speaking cultures. Study and discussion of printed and broadcast sources from various humanistic and social scientific fields. Recent topics: The Folklore of the Alps and 20th Century German Society on Film. In German. Repeatable for credit when the topic changes.
Prerequisite: 312 or consent of instructor. 3 credits. (IS or GP)

MLGR-480  INDEPENDENT STUDY

A flexible course suited to the needs of the individual student. Reading, research, and writing on a special topic.
Prerequisites: 302 and consent of instructor. 1-5 credits.

Modern Languages - Interdisciplinary

MDLA-040  COMMUNITY SERVICE

Community service activity working with elementary and/or secondary teachers responsible for instruction of students learning English as their second language. Possible activities: assisting teachers in the development of appropriate English Language Learner (ELL) lessons and activities; directly instructing students; translating; and tutoring and assisting students who are not native English speakers. 1 credit. (EL)

MDLA-098  SENIOR TUTOR

1 credit (EL)

MDLA-340  INTRODUCTION TO LINGUISTICS (CROSS- LISTED WITH ANTH 340)

Language in its broadest sense. Discussion of phonetics, sound laws, and the linguistic relationship between English and other modern languages. Dialect geography, semantic change, bilingualism, and other topics. Study of the cultural roots of the Western Indo-European language family. 3 credits.

MDLA-365  ETHNIC DIVERSITY IN EASTERN AND CENTRAL EUROPE (CROSS-LISTED WITH HIST 365)

History and politics of Southeast, East Central, and Central Europe from the 1500s to the present. Consideration of ethnic, religious, cultural, and linguistic diversity from Ottoman expansion westward to Habsburg heritage of modern Austria. Taught in German. Offered fall in Vienna only. 4 credits. (IS or VP or GP)

MDLA-370  MODERN LANGUAGES RESEARCH METHODS

Practical preparation for designing and carrying out significant thesislength research project; introduction to key methodologies and theoretical approaches used in both humanities and social science disciplines. Offered Spring. 2 credits.

MDLA-380  ABROAD PORTFOLIO

Preparatory work for MDLA 483, MLFR 485, MLJP 485, and MLSP 485. Construction of a portfolio during the year abroad including self assessment of progress in all skills and increased cultural understanding, representative coursework, and oral interviews. See Majors Manual for specific requirements related to each language. All required items must be turned in on time as a prerequisite for admittance to MDLA 483. 2 credits

MDLA-483  ADVANCED CROSS-CULTURAL SEMINAR

Integration of students' personal experiences living and studying abroad with the course work completed on campus and abroad for the language major. Emphasis on the role of language, both verbal and non-verbal, in cross-cultural interactions.
Prerequisites: senior standing, acceptance as a language major, and MDLA 380. 2-4 credits. (MWI)

MDLA-487  INTERNSHIP

Practical experience in a work setting drawing upon the specialized skills developed by language majors. Additional expertise as required for a given internship setting (marketing, communications, leadership potential, etc.). Preference given to language majors and minors. 40 hours on-site for each enrolled credit.
Prerequisites: Advanced language proficiency, complete preapplication, departmental approval. 1-3 credits. (Satisfactory/ Unsatisfactory) (EL)

MDLA-490  SENIOR THESIS

By invitation from language faculty on the basis of an interview and examination. Long (8,000 words minimum) research paper pertaining to a literary, linguistic, or cultural aspect of the target culture. Written in the target language in close contact with the thesis director. Culminates in an oral defense before the language faculty. 5 credits. (WI)

Modern Languages - Latin

MLLA-101  ELEMENTARY LATIN I

Intensive introduction to Latin grammar, withreadings in classical and medieval texts.Does not fulfill language requirement unless 102also taken.Offered January.4 credits

MLLA-102  ELEMENTARY LATIN II

Continuation of 101.Offered spring.4 credits

Music (Including Dance)

MUSC-040  BEGINNING CLASS PIANO

Skills on note reading, melodic patterns, chord progressions, finger technique, transposition, harmonization, improvisation and sight-reading. Cannot be audited. Two hours each week. 1 credit. (EL)

MUSC-041  INTERMEDIATE CLASS PIANO FOR NON-MAJORS

Performance of keyboard repertoire from folk toclassical. Broadens skill development begun in040. Cannont be audited. Two hours each week.1 credit (EL)

MUSC-042  BEGINNING CLASS VOICE

Basic vocal technique for beginning singers.Performance for other students in informalclassroom setting. Cannot be audited. Two hourseach week.1 credit (EL)

MUSC-044  BEGINNING CLASS GUITAR

Development of basic guitar performance skills;music notation and terminology; technique;performance and interpretation; repertoire inclassical guitar. Two hours each week. Cannot beaudited.
Prerequisite: none.1 credit (EL)

MUSC-070  LINFIELD DANCE ENSEMBLE

Meets three hours each week.1 credit (EL)

MUSC-071  BEGINNING MODERN DANCE TECH

Basic modern dance skills, concepts, andtechniques. Awareness of movement, physicalstrength and coordination of the body and properbody alignment. Two hours each week.1 credit (EL)

MUSC-072  INTERMEDIATE MODERN DANCE TECHNIQUE

Continuation of studies begun in 071. Two hourseach week.
Prerequisite: 071 or consent of instructor.1 credit (EL)

MUSC-073  BEGINNING TAP DANCE

Basic tap dance skills including flap, shuffle,pull back, riffs, time steps, and breaks. Analysisof rhythm through movement. Combining steps intophrases and short dances. Two hours each week.1 credit (EL)

MUSC-074  BEGINNING JAZZ DANCE TECH

Basic jazz dance skills, concepts and techniques.Awareness of movement, physical strength andcoordination of the body, and proper bodyalignment. Two hours each week.1 credit (EL)

MUSC-075  BEGINNING BALLET TECHNIQUE

Basic ballet skills, concepts and techniques.Awareness of movement, physical strength andcoordination of the body, focus on proper bodyalignment. Two hours each week.1 credit (EL)

MUSC-076  INTERMEDIATE BALLET TECHNIQUE

Continuation of studies begun in 075.Two hours each week.
Prerequisite: 075 or consent of instructor.1 credit (EL)

MUSC-077  ADVANCED BALLET TECH

Continuation of studies begun in 076. Two hourseach week.
Prerequisite: 076 or consent of instructor.1 credit (EL)

MUSC-079  INTERMEDIATE TAP DANCE

Basic tap dance skills, concepts and techniquesdeveloping more complex skills and routines.Two hours each week.1 credit (EL)

MUSC-080  AFRICAN DANCE

An introduction to specific dances from variouscountries in Africa. Introduces fundamentalmovements and rhythms from many different stylesof traditional African dance. Builds techniqueand flexibility.1 credit (EL)

MUSC-084  INTERMEDIATE JAZZ DANCE TECH

Continuation of studies begun in 074. Two hourseach week.
Prerequisite: 074 or consent of instructor.1 credit (EL)

MUSC-088  STAGE MOVEMENT FOR MUSICAL

Stage movement to enhance the sensitivity andtechnique of the musical stage actor. Specializedmovement for the winter musical, includingchoreography. Two hours each week for techniqueplus rehearsals for production.
Prerequisite: audition.1 credit (EL)

MUSC-100  MUSIC FUNDAMENTALS

Elementary aspects of notation: pitch, scales, intervals, keys and key signatures, note value, meter, time signatures, triads and rhythm. 3 credits. (CS)

MUSC-101  APPLIED MUSIC FOR NON-MAJORS


$425/credit fee.1-2 credits

MUSC-108  WILDCAT MEN'S GLEE CLUB

All-male chorus consisting of singers from across campus and community; performance of variety of musical styles written for male voices; focus on building healthy singing technique and ensemble musicianship. Most performances on or near campus. Full-year commitment in ensemble is recommended. No audition required. 1 credit.

MUSC-109  LINFIELD WOMEN'S VOCAL ENSEMBLE

All-female chorus of singers from across campus;performance of variety of musical styles writtenfor treble voices; focus on building healthysinging technique and ensemble musicianship. Mostperformances on or near campus. Full-yearcommitment in ensemble is recommended. No auditionrequired.1 credit

MUSC-110  CONCERT BAND


Prerequisite: advisory audition. 1 credit.

MUSC-111  JAZZ CHOIR


Prerequisite: audition.1 credit

MUSC-112  JAZZ BAND


Prerequisite: audition.1 credit

MUSC-113  WIND SYMPHONY


Prerequisite: advisory audition.1 credit

MUSC-114  LINFIELD CHAMBER ORCHESTRA


Prerequisite: audition.1 credit

MUSC-115  CHAMBER ENSEMBLES

1. Woodwinds2. Flute Choir 3. Brass 4. Miscellaneous-Instrumental 5. Strings 6. Women's Vocal Ensemble 7. Musical Theatre-Instrumental 8. Musical Theatre-Vocal 9. Miscellaneous-Vocal
The different chamber ensemble sections areidentified by term and by section numbers on thecourse listings.
Prerequisite: audition.1 credit

MUSC-117  CHOIR


Prerequisite: audition. 1 credit.

MUSC-119  OPERA THEATRE

Performance of opera and musical theatre scenes. Rehearsal one hour per week, increasing to more intense schedule prior to performance. Offered spring. 1 credit.

MUSC-121  MUSIC THEORY I

Melodic and harmonic analysis, four-part writing and voice leading, harmonic progression, techniques of harmonization and non-harmonic tones. Elementary exercises in original composition and in analysis. Three hours each week.
Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 2 credits.

MUSC-122  EAR TRAINING & SIGHT SINGING I

Ear training and sight singing skills. Materials generally parallel 121. Taken concurrently with 121. Two hours each week. 1 credit.

MUSC-123  MUSIC THEORY II

Four-part writing and voice leading; studies of seventh chords, secondary dominants, modulation to closely related keys, borrowed chords and introduction to augmented sixth chords. Exercises in analysis and composition with emphasis on instrumental and keyboard works. Three hours each week.
Prerequisites: 121 and 122. Taken concurrently with 124. 2 credits.

MUSC-124  EAR TRAINING & SIGHT SINGING II

Continuation of studies begun in 122 which generally parallel studies in 123. Taken concurrently with 123. Two hours each week. 1 credit.

MUSC-131  UNDERSTANDING MUSIC

Materials, forms, and vocabulary used in music. Styles and genres of music literature. Representative composers from each historical period. Development of listening skills. 3 credits. (CS)

MUSC-140  BEGINNING KEYBOARD FOR PROFESSIONAL MUSICIAN

For music majors. Skills on note and clef reading, melodic patterns, chord progressions, finger technique, transposition, harmonization, improvisation, and sight-reading. Diverse repertoire and class performance. Cannot be audited. Two hours each week.
Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 1 credit.

MUSC-141  INTERMEDIATE KEYBOARD STUDIES FOR THE PROFESSIONAL MUSICIAN

For music majors. A continuation of 140 at a more intensive level. Skills on note and clef reading, melodic patterns, chord progressions, finger technique, transposition, harmonization, improvisation, and sight-reading. Diverse repertoire and class performance. Cannot be audited. Two hours each week.
Prerequisite: 140 with a grade of B or better or consent of instructor. 1 credit.

MUSC-143  INTERMEDIATE CLASS VOICE

Vocal technique for those with some previous knowledge who seek improvement as soloists and/or choral singers. Study through classical literature and classroom performances. Cannot be audited. Two hours each week.
Prerequisite: 042 or consent of instructor. 1 credit.

MUSC-145  INTERMEDIATE CLASS GUITAR

Continuation of 044. Cannot be audited. Two hours each week.
Prerequisite: 044 or consent of instructor. 1 credit.

MUSC-202  APPLIED MUSIC FOR MINORS

1 credit

MUSC-203  APPLIED MUSIC FOR FIRST & SECOND YEAR MAJORS

1-2 credits

MUSC-221  MUSIC THEORY III

Additional study of augmented sixth chords, altered dominants, Neapolitan sixth chord, diminished seventh chords, chromatic mediants, foreign key modulation and 9th, 11th and 13th chords. Advanced exercises in original composition and in analysis. Three hours each week.
Prerequisites: 123/124. Taken concurrently with 222. 2 credits.

MUSC-222  EAR TRAINING & SIGHT SINGING III

Advanced ear training and sight singing skills to parallel 221. Chromatic musical styles. Taken concurrently with 221. Two hours each week. 1 credit.

MUSC-223  MUSIC THEORY IV

Evolution of harmonic tonality into 20th century compositional techniques: ultrachromaticism, denial of harmonic function, impressionism, twelve tone technique, serialism, and other compositional devices. Short original compositions and analytical problems as preparation for upper level theory. Three hours each week.
Prerequisites: 221/222. Taken concurrently with 224. 2 credits.

MUSC-224  EAR TRAINING & SIGHT SINGING IV

Continuation of studies begun in 222 with some emphasis on 20th century musical styles. Two hours each week.Taken concurrently with 223. 1 credit.

MUSC-225  MUSIC AND TECHNOLOGY

Introduction to the practical application of computers, synthesizers and audio equipment in classical and popular music.
Prerequisite: 121 or consent of the instructor. 3 credits.

MUSC-233  MUSIC HISTORY & LITERATURE: AN INTRODUCTION

Primarily for music majors, minors, and students with strong backgrounds in music. In-depth as well as broad coverage of the following: materials, forms, and vocabulary used in music; styles and genres of music literature; representative composers from each historical period; development of listening skills.
Prerequisite: 121 or consent of the instructor. 3 credits. (CS or VP)

MUSC-234  LYRIC DICTION

Phonetic study of Italian, French, and German. Emphasis on applying diction skills through performing solo voice repertoire. Corequisite: Applied Music - Voice. 3 credits.

MUSC-240  ADVANCED KEYBOARD STUDIES FOR THE PROFESSIONAL MUSICIAN

For music majors. A continuation of 140/141 at a more intensive level. Skills on note and clef reading, melodic patterns, chord progressions, finger technique, transposition, harmonization, improvisation, and sight-reading. Diverse repertoire and class performance. Cannot be audited. Prepares the music education major for the required piano proficiency.
Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 1 credit.

MUSC-241  ADVANCED KEYBOARD STUDIES FOR THE PROFESSIONAL MUSICIAN II

For music majors. A continuation of 240 at a more intensive level. Skills on note and clef reading, melodic patterns, chord progressions, finger technique, transposition, harmonization, improvisation, and sight-reading. Diverse repertoire and class performance. Cannot be audited. With successful completion of this course with a grade of B or better, the music education major fulfills the required piano proficiency.
Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 1 credit.

MUSC-243  BASIC CONDUCTING

Study of and experience with the basic techniques of choral and instrumental conducting.
Prerequisite: 123 or consent of instructor. 2 credits.

MUSC-245  INTRO TO ORGAN LITERATURE & PERFORMANCE

Techniques and practices in organ playing.Exercises in keyboard and pedaling; discussion ofregistration; regular prepared performances ofstandard pieces in the repertory. Exposure tothe art of organ building and historicalcompositional practices.
Prerequisite: Intermediate level piano with repertoire including Eight Little Preludes and Fugues (J.S. Bach), Microcosmos Book III (Bartok), and Kindersangen (Schumann) or by audition. 2 credits.

MUSC-251  AMERICAN SENSE IN SOUND

A study of the three main areas of American contribution to the world's music: classical music, musical theatre, and jazz. 3 credits. (CS or US)

MUSC-312  MUSICIANSHIP FOR ELEMENTARY TEACHERS

Background for planning enjoyable educational musical experiences in the classroom. Meets the Oregon Department of Education requirement for preparation of classroom teachers for music teaching. Should be taken prior to student teaching. 3 credits. (CS)

MUSC-320  MUSICAL FORM AND ANALYSIS

Survey of all major musical forms with a comprehensive discussion of appropriate analytical techniques and practical application to analytical projects. Two hours each week.
Prerequisites: 223, 224 and consent of instructor. 2 credits. (MWI)

MUSC-326  ORCHESTRATION

Beginning study of orchestration with a survey of instruments and their use in small and large ensemble writing. Application through orchestration and performance of assigned projects. Two hours each week.
Prerequisites: 223, 224 and consent of instructor. 2 credits.

MUSC-328  CONTRAPUNTAL TECHNIQUES

Counterpoint and contrapuntal forms used to refine and develop techniques begun in lower level theory. Survey of major contrapuntal forms and techniques with application to counterpoint projects. Two hours each week.
Prerequisites: 223, 224 and consent of instructor. 2 credits.

MUSC-339  MUSIC METHODS: ELEMENTARY

Methods and materials, including practical and artistic components, needed for teaching music at the elementary level. Extensive off-campus observation and possible aiding or teaching in the public schools. 2 credits.

MUSC-340  STRING METHODS

Basic playing technique for each of the four-stringed instruments; violin, viola, cello, and bass. Bowing, finger patterns, notations, and discussion of methods for teaching strings. Two hours each week. Offered in alternate years. 1 credit.

MUSC-341  WOODWIND METHODS

Basic playing techniques for flute, oboe, bassoon, clarinet, and saxophone. Basic embouchures, fingerings, reed problems, instrument care, and methods of teaching woodwinds. Two hours each week. Offered in alternate years. 1 credit.

MUSC-342  BRASS METHODS

Basic playing techniques for trumpet, trombone, horn, baritone, and tuba. Basic embouchures, fingerings, and slide techniques. Instrument care and discussion of methods for teaching brass. Two hours each week. Offered in alternate years. 1 credit.

MUSC-343  PERCUSSION METHODS

Basic playing techniques for snare drum, tympani, cymbals, and other percussion instruments. Writing and performing small scale pieces for class performance. Methods for teaching percussion. Two hours each week. Offered in alternate years. 1 credit.

MUSC-347  CHORAL METHODS: SECONDAY

Methods and materials, including practical and artistic components, needed for teaching choral music at the secondary level. Extensive off-campus observation and possible aiding or teaching in the public schools. 2 credits.

MUSC-348  INSTRUMENTAL METHODS: SECONDARY

Methods and materials, including practical and artistic components, needed for teaching instrumental music at the secondary level. Extensive offcampus observation and possible aiding or teaching in the public schools. 2 credits. (MWI)

MUSC-349  ART SONG

A detailed study of one sub-area of the art song repertoire chosen from: a) the German Lied; b) the French melodie; c) Russian song of the Romantic Period; d) the contemporary American art song. 4 credits.

MUSC-354  MUSIC HISTORY: 20TH CENTURY MUSIC

Musical style, forms, composers, and media. Performance practice of compositions from the 20th century.
Prerequisites: 221 and 233, or consent of instructor. 3 credits. (CS)

MUSC-355  WOMEN IN MUSIC

A study of art and popular music to create awareness and inform attitudes about women's contributions. Topics include performers and composers, characterizations of women in music literature, current gender ideology, and past and present cultural values affecting women's participation in music. 3 credits. (CS or GP)

MUSC-356  MUSIC HISTORY: MEDIEVAL, RENAISSANCE, And Baroque Eras

Music literature, style, forms, composers, media, and performance practices of music through 1750.
Prerequisites: 123 and 233, or consent of instructor. 3 credits. (CS)

MUSC-357  MUSIC HISTORY: CLASSICAL & ROMANTIC PERIODS

Musical styles, forms, composers, media, and performance practice of music from 1750 to 1900.
Prerequisites: 123 and 233, or consent of instructor. 3 credits. (CS)

MUSC-360  CLASSICAL MUSIC IN THE NORTHWEST

Several days spent at a music festival. Discussion sessions and lectures about music heard. Reading about composers and genres represented on the program. 1 credit.

MUSC-403  APPLIED MUSIC FOR THIRD & FOURTH YEAR MAJORS

For students who have passed Junior standing.
$55 usage fee.1-2 credits

MUSC-443  ADVANCED CONDUCTING

Advanced techniques in choral and instrumental conducting. Score selection with in-depth analysis. Includes final conducting project with selected group.
Prerequisite: 243. 2 credits.

MUSC-447  VOCAL PEDAGOGY

Development and practical application of techniques for teaching voice/choir in the classroom and private studio. For the music education and vocal performance concentrations. Research and observation, with experience teaching fellow students. Three hours each week.
Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Offered in alternate years. 2 credits.

MUSC-448  KEYBOARD ACCOMPANYING

Work with both instrumentalists and vocalists exploring the various techniques involved in accompanying the sonata, art song or lied, solo concerto, operatic aria, American popular music, and the dance studio. Meets two hours a week.
Prerequisites: one year of music theory, one year of music history, and piano skills of the intermediate to advanced level. Offered in alternate years. 2 credits.

MUSC-449  KEYBOARD PEDAGOGY

Materials for the beginner through the advanced performer. Basic keyboard technique; standard keyboard repertoire from the 18th century to the present including art music as well as contemporary American idioms; application in the teaching setting. Meets two hours a week.
Prerequisites: one year of music theory, one year of music history, and piano skills of intermediate to advanced level. Offered in alternate years. 2 credits.

MUSC-480  INDEPENDENT STUDY

Advanced study and/or research in theory, applied music pedagogy, musicology, or music education.
Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 1-5 credits.

MUSC-487  INTERNSHIP

1-5 credits (EL)

MUSC-490  SENIOR THESIS

Advanced study on a topic of special interest to the student, generally in the form of research or musical analysis.
Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 3 credits. (MWI)

MUSC-491  SENIOR RECITAL

Preparation and presentation of applied music or composition repertoire in the student's applied area, under the instructors supervision.
Prerequisite: three years of prior applied study or equivalent. Recital subject to pre-recital jury examination before public presentation. 1 credit. (MWI)

MUSC-492  SENIOR PROJECT

Final culminating project for Music Composition-Theory students. May focus on a significant composition for multiple instruments and/or voice with a supporting paper, a set of pieces composed for a specific purpose with presentation and supporting paper, or a theoretical issue in music theory with paper and presentation of findings. 1 credit. (MWI)

Philosophy

PHIL-170  CRITICAL THINKING

Introduction to logical and inductive reasoning emphasizing arguments in everyday contexts. Common informal fallacies and their relation to debates about current events and prominent philosophical arguments. Topics including emotive and ambiguous language, causation, common statistical mistakes, and how to read polls. Offered spring of oddnumbered years. 4 credits.

PHIL-180  MORAL PROBLEMS

General introduction to Western ethical philosophy with a focus on application of ethical theory to contemporary moral issues. Examination of classic and contemporary readings to gain working familiarity with central theories, issues, and moral dilemmas in ethics. Some comparative work in Non-western and/or divergent U.S. ethical traditions. Examination of issues in both normative and metaethics, including: the problems of relativism and skepticism; the nature and limits of moral obligations to others; religion an d ethics; and ethical analysis applied to social and political issues relevant to 21st century U.S. life. 4 credits. (UQ or US)

PHIL-190  LOGIC

Introduction to categorical logic, truth-functional logic, quantificational logic, induction, and the classification of logical fallacies. Includes translation of arguments in ordinary language into their logical equivalents as well as some study of the properties of logical systems. Offered spring of odd-numbered years. 4 credits. (QR)

PHIL-210  SPORT, PHILOSOPHY AND SOCIETY (CROSS- LISTED WITH SOAN 210)

Examination of sport from philosophical and sociological perspectives. Topics may include metaphysics of sports and games, sports and technology, human embodiment and sports, issues of race, gender, and politics, unique ethical problems of sports (e.g. doping), sport and society, the connections between art, aesthetics, and sport, or the relation between sport, culture, and life. Readings from classical and contemporary sources. Offered fall of even-numbered years. 4 credits. (UQ)

PHIL-230  ANCIENT PHILOSOPHY

Historical survey of ancient Western philosophy from the Presocratics to the Neoplatonism of Plotinus (6th Century BCE to 6th Century CE). Study of selected primary source readings to examine foundational Western questions and conceptions about the nature of being, the nature and limits of knowledge, and the nature and origin of politics and morality. Offered fall of odd-numbered years. 4 credits. (UQ)

PHIL-270  PHILOSOPHY OF EDUCATION

Examination of educational philosophies operative in and/or relevant to the U.S. educational tradition. Designed to bring into focus the often unexamined ways in which educational goals, policies, procedures, methods, etc. are founded upon particular conceptions of the nature, purpose, and interrelations of human beings. Primary source readings are utilized to critically interrogate selected educational theories, practices, and outcomes through an examination of the philosophical and cultural assumptions and practices of their respective theorists and practitioners. Offered spring semester of odd numbered years. 4 credits. (UQ or US)

PHIL-280  PHILOSOPHY & LITERATURE

Examination of imaginative literature as a vehicle for philosophy, examining those philosophical problems best suited to literary expression. Variable content where philosophical and critical pieces work in conjunction with works ranging from novels and short stories to plays or poems. Considers such issues as truth and literature, interpretation, authorship, ontology of fictional characters, and the definition of literature. Offered spring of even-numbered years. 4 credits. (UQ)

PHIL-285  Philosophy of Science

Introduction to philosophy of science, including such topics as verification and falsification of theories, laws in nature, objectivity, impartiality, theory versus description, and value commitments of scientists outside the framework of scientific explanation. Offered fall of odd-numbered years. 4 credits (UQ)

PHIL-360  PHILOSOPHY OF LAW

Examination of moral dimension of legal reasoning (jurisprudence), with consideration of such topics as natural law, legal positivism, jurisprudence and the U.S. Constitution, international law, and moral justification of punishment. Offered fall of odd-numbered years. 4 credits. (UQ)

PHIL-370  20TH CENTURY PHILOSOPHY

Historical survey of twentieth-century philosophy, including pragmatism, positivism, ordinary language philosophy, process philosophy, and post-modern philosophy. Offered fall of even-numbered years. 4 credits. (UQ)

PHIL-375  COMPARATIVE PHILOSPHY: ASIAN THOUGHT

Study of philosophical and cultural traditions of some area(s) of Asia, as compared with those traditions in the West, especially the U.S. Readings consist of primary and secondary sources in literature of East-West comparative philosophy, including texts of Confucianism, Taoism, Buddhism, and/or Hinduism. Offered January term or spring of even-numbered years. 4 credits. (UQ or GP)

PHIL-380  EXISTENTIALISM

Examination of interrelated movements of Existentialism and Phenomenology, beginning with Dostoyevsky or Nietzsche as introduction to existentialist themes. Primary source readings include texts from selection of movements' most influential thinkers: Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Husserl, Heidegger, Arendt, Sartre, DeBeauvoir, and/or Merleau-Ponty. Some analysis and/or reading of contemporary issues or texts. Offered fall of odd-numbered years. 4 credits. (UQ)

PHIL-430  CONTEMPORARY TOPICS IN PHILOSOPHY

Senior-level seminar focusing on key issue(s), current topic(s), and/or exploring some school(s) of thought from the last forty years of philosophical scholarship. Topical content variable, according to discretion and expertise of instructor. May be repeated for credit with different content.
Prerequisite: at least one lower-level philosophy class or consent of instructor. Offered spring of odd-numbered years. 4 credits. (UQ)

PHIL-439  PEER INSTRUCTION

Advanced study opportunity for outstanding students to assist faculty members in the classroom. Focus on course content and pedagogy.
Prerequisites: Application and consent of instructor. 1-4 credits. (Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory)

PHIL-460  AMERICAN PHILOSPHY

Examination of the historical emergence and nature of classical U.S. American Philosophies, including Puritanism, Transcendentalism, and Pragmatism, with concentration on American Pragmatism. Primary source readings include contemporary American perspectives, including one or more of the following: Neo-Pragmatist, Native American, African American, and/or Latin American perspectives.
Prerequisite: at least one lower-level philosophy course or consent of instructor. Offered spring of odd-numbered years. 4 credits. (UQ or US)

PHIL-470  PHILOSOPHY OF MIND

Examination of issues arising when we think philosophically about the mind, with consideration of advances in neuroscience, cognitive science, and artificial intelligence. Questions include: what is mind , what counts as a thinking being , what is consciousness , could a robot or computer ever be considered a person Topics include dualism, materialism, the nature of consciousness, the nature of thought, and others.
Prerequisite: at least one lower-level philosophy class or consent of instructor. Offered fall of odd-numbered years. 4 credits. (UQ)

PHIL-487  INTERNSHIP

Individualized learning in applied philosophy through work in an approved business, government agency, or community organization.
Prerequisites: junior standing or higher, and consent of instructor. 3-4 credits (EL)

PHIL-490  SENIOR RESEARCH/THESIS

Intensive research on a topic of special interest to the student, culminating in a senior thesis on an advanced topic in philosophy. Seminar includes course readings, discussions, and presentations, along with research guidance and collaborative writing support. Required of majors in their senior year. Minors may enroll with instructor consent. Offered every fall. 4 credits. (MWI)

Physics

PHYS-025  LABORATORY TECHNIQUES: MACHINE SHOP


$30 lab fee. 1 credit (EL)

PHYS-100  HOW THINGS WORK

Introduction to physical concepts behind modern technology. Studies of science of every day phenomena considered, including how electricity is generated, how refrigerators operate, and how CDs and DVDs contain information. Lecture, readings, writing, and discussion. Recommended: MATH 105 or equivalent. 3 credits. (NW)

PHYS-101  DESCRIPTIVE ASTRONOMY

The solar system, stars and their evolution, galaxies and cosmology. Emphasis on observational evidence. Lecture, discussion, and occasional evening observing sessions. 3 credits. (NW)

PHYS-102  THE PHYSICS OF ART & MUSIC

Ways that artistic expression are explained through physical mechanisms. Studies of light, color, and sound will be explored. Lecture, discussion, and occasional evening trips.
$50 lab fee. 3 credits. (NW)

PHYS-103  PHYSICAL GEOLOGY

The earth's crust and mantle with emphasis on physical and chemical processes. Concepts of energy, uniformity, and plate tectonics. Erosion by various agents, volcanism, earthquakes, and mountain building. Lecture, discussion, and laboratory, including mapping and field work. 3 credits. (NW)

PHYS-109  AVIATION PHYSICS & GROUND SCHOOL

Introduction to all physical aspects of flying: aerodynamics, forces, meteorology, electromagnetic spectrum, and vectors. Complete ground school training coverage for those seeking a private pilot's license for single-engine land planes. 3 credits. (NW)

PHYS-210  INTRODUCTION TO MECHANICS

Introduction to the various ways in which the mechanical universe is described, using the concept of particles, waves, and flows. Extensive treatment of Newtonian mechanics, including motion, forces, energy, and waves. The special theory of relativity and basic ideas of quantum mechanics are introduced. Lecture, discussion, and laboratory.
$15 lab fee.

PHYS-211  INTRODUCTION TO ELECTROMAGNETISM

Introduction to the study of electromagnetic force, including the basic laws of electricity and magnetism, the concept of a field, Maxwell's equations, basic circuits, elecromagnetic radiation, and optics. The relationship of electromagnetism to the special theory of relativity. Lecture, discussion, and laboratory.
$15 lab fee.
Prerequisite: 210. Recommended: MATH 175 concurrently. 5 credits. (QR)

PHYS-215  MODERN PHYSICS

Developments since 1900; relativity, the nature of radiation and matter and their interaction, radioactivity, elementary quantum mechanics, introductory atomic and nuclear physics. Lecture and discussion.
Prerequisite: 211 and MATH 175. Recommended: 385 and CHEM 210 concurrently. Offered fall. 4 credits. (NW)

PHYS-220  THERMAL & STATISTICAL PHYSICS

Study of solids, liquids, and gases at the atomic level to develop appreciation for and mathematical understanding of their thermal properties. Topics derive from thermodynamics, statistical mechanics, and solid state physics including transport processes, energy distributions, classical and quantum statistical development.
Prerequisites: 211 and MATH 175. Recommended: CHEM 210. Offered spring. 3 credits.

PHYS-252  ENGINEERING STATICS AND DYNAMICS

Newtonian mechanics with emphasis on problem-solving and engineering applications: force, mass, and acceleration; force systems; free-body diagrams; distributed forces; particle kinematics; motion of rigid bodies; conservation of energy; translational and angular momentum; systems of particles; applications of vector algebra and calculus. Lecture and discussion.
Prerequisite: 210 and MATH 200 (may be taken concurrently. Offered fall of odd numbered years. 4 credits.

PHYS-253  STRENGTH OF MATERIALS

Continuation of study of engineering mechanics following 252. Equilibrium and geometric compatibility in devices and structures; Hookes Law, stress and strain in variously loaded members; deformation and deflection; theory of failure. Lecture and discussion.
Prerequisites: 210 and 252. Offered spring of even numbered years. 3 credits.

PHYS-303  INTRODUCTION TO MATERIALS SCIENCE

Introduction to the science of materials (metals, ceramics, polymers, composites, and semiconductors). Crystal structures and designations. Techniques of materials characterization. Mechanical, thermal, electrical, and magnetic properties. Forming and materials processing. Problem solving, lecture, discussion, and field trips.
Prerequisite: 215. 3 credits.

PHYS-315  CIRCUITS AND ELECTRONICS I

Electrical concepts and measurements. Circuit laws and theorems. Analysis of dc and ac steady state circuits, including phasor analysis techniques and Bode plots. Operational amplifiers and diodes. Digital combinational and sequential logic circuitry. Lecture, discussion, and laboratory.
Prerequisite: MATH 170. Recommended: 211, junior standing. Offered fall. 4 credits. (NW)

PHYS-316  CIRCUITS AND ELECTRONICS II

Semiconductor materials and solid-state devices. Diode and transistor circuits. Selected topics such as magnetism, inductors, and transformers; second-order ac and dc circuit analysis; Laplace and Fourier transforms; analog to digital conversion; and electronic system design. Completion of an independent project. Lecture, discussion, and laboratory.
Prerequisite: 315. Offered spring of odd-numbered years. 4 credits. (QR)

PHYS-325  COMPUTATIONAL PHYSICS

Use of computers in scientific problem-solving using MATLAB, algorithm development, numerical differentiation and integration, sorting, data analysis, simulation development. Laboratory and lecture.
Prerequisites: 211 or consent of instructor. 3 credits. (QR)

PHYS-370  ADVANCED TOPICS IN PHYSICS

Selected advanced physics topics.
Prerequisite: 215 or consent of instructor. 3 credits.

PHYS-385  GREAT EXPERIMENTS IN PHYSICS

Experiments in modern physics, thermal physics, and electricity and magnetism. Introduction to planning and executing physics experiments. Introduction to writing reports in the standard journal style.
Prerequisite: 215 (may be taken concurrently). 1 credit.

PHYS-386  EXPLORATIONS IN EXPERIMENTAL PHYSICS

Design and execution of physics experiments. Most projects will be drawn from topics in modern physics, thermal physics, and electricity and magnetism. Results will be reported using standard journal style.
Prerequisite: 385. Offered spring. 1 credit.

PHYS-420  CLASSICAL MECHANICS

Classical theories and analytical methods of statics and dynamics: kinematics, vectors and tensors, potential theory, moving coordinate systems and generalized methods. Lecture and discussion.
Prerequisites: 211 and MATH 200. Recommended: MATH 210. Offered fall. 4 credits.

PHYS-440  ELECTRICITY AND MAGNETISM I

Review of vector analysis, electrostatic and magnetostatic theory, field properties in matter. Lecture and discussion.
Prerequisites: 211 and MATH 200. Recommended: MATH 210. Offered fall. 3 credits.

PHYS-441  ELECTRICITY & MAGNETISM II

Electrodynamics, Maxwell's equations, electromagnetic waves, radiation, relativity.
Prerequisite: 440. Offered spring. 3 credits.

PHYS-475  QUANTUM PHYSICS

Quantum mechanics and its application in studies of atomic systems and nuclei. Lecture and discussion.
Prerequisites: 215 and MATH 200. Recommended: 420, MATH 210, 250, and junior standing. Offered spring. 4 credits.

PHYS-480  INDEPENDENT STUDY

Supplemental work for students with advanced standing in physics. By permission. 1-5 credits.

PHYS-485  PHYSICS COLLOQUIUM

Presentations of topics of current interest by visiting speakers, faculty, and students. May be repeated for credit. 1 credit.

PHYS-488  RESEARCH

Individual research projects for Physics and Applied Physics majors. Work done in collaboration with faculty. Departmental permission required. May be repeated for credit. 1-5 credits.

PHYS-489  THESIS RESEARCH

Required of all Physics and Applied Physics majors in the senior year.
Prerequisite: 386. 1-5 credits.

PHYS-490  SENIOR THESIS

Comprehensive written report on advanced level individual investigative project. Also requires public oral presentation of project and participation in Physics Colloquium. Baccalaureate thesis required of all Physics and Applied Physics majors.
Prerequisites: 489 and senior standing. Offered spring. 3 credits. (MWI)

Political Science

POLS-201  AMERICAN POLITICS

How our national government is supposed to workand how it does work. Problems and tensions.Contemporary issues and controversies.4 credits (IS or US)

POLS-220  GREAT POLITICAL THINKERS

Unchanging and continuing themes and issues ofpolitics and political philosophers. Originalworks of selected major political theoristsincluding Plato, Aristotle, Machiavelli, thecontract theorists, and Marx.4 credits (UQ)

POLS-225  THE STUDY OF LAW

The nature, functions, uses, and operations of the legal process. Types of law (civil, criminal, equity) courts, judges, and other legal actors. Specific current problems to illustrate the legal process. 4 credits. (IS)

POLS-230  RESEARCH METHODOLOGY

Qualitative and quantitative approaches to the study of politics and public policy. The logic, assumptions, goals, and limitations of the scientific approach to the study of politics, with emphasis on quantitative methods and the use of computers in research.
Prerequisite: 201, 210, or 220, or consent of instructor. 5 credits. (QR)

POLS-240  STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENT

State and local government structures, processes, and policies. Problems of local-state cooperation and relations with specific policy areas of concern to these governmental levels, including pollution, law enforcement, taxation, and education. 4 credits.

POLS-310  AMERICAN POLITICAL THOUGHT

American political thought from colonial times to the present. Consideration of how the political theories of early American thinkers addressed the problems of their age and relate to modern problems and issues. Theories of change and resolution. Application of contemporary theories from various areas in society to evolutionary trends in American thought. 4 credits. (UQ or US)

POLS-312  REBELS, THUGS, AND SKEPTICS: TWENTIETH- CENTURY POLITICAL THEORY

Examination of original works of twentieth-century political theory. Consideration of alternative views of central political concepts such as power, liberty, equality, and resistance.
Prerequisites: 220 or PHIL 365, or consent of the instructor. 4 credits. (UQ)

POLS-315  POLITICS AND RELIGION (CROSS-LISTED WITH RELS 315)

Examination of the relationship between politics and religion in varying contexts: theories of the role of religion in government and society, religious social movements, contemporary political controversies involving religion.
Prerequisites: 201, 210, or 220, or RELS 110 or 115 or consent of instructor. 4 credits. (UQ)

POLS-320  LAW, RIGHTS AND JUSTICE

Examination of rights and justice in the United States. Analysis of law in society. The concepts of obligation, authority, disobedience, and punishment. Focus on contemporary legal controversies.
Prerequisite: any POLS 200-level course or consent of instructor. 4 credits. (IS or UQ)

POLS-325  US SUPREME COURT

Exploration of the role of the Supreme Court in the American political system. Examination of debates over the Court's proper role in the system, empirical research on judicial behavior, and the role of the executive and legislative branches in the judicial nomination and confirmation process. 4 credits. (IS)

POLS-330  POLITICS & THE ARTS

Exploration of what can be learned about politics from other disciplines, including literature, film, and the fine arts. 4 credits.

POLS-333  GENDER AND POLITICS

Exploration of concepts of gender in society and their social and political implication. Analysis of sex, gender, and sexuality through different theoretical approaches. Focus on political behavior, rights, recognition and justice. 4 credits. (IS or GP)

POLS-335  TOPICS IN PUBLIC POLICY

The making, content, and consequences of public policies in American, cross-national and/ or international contexts. Analysis of the policy making process in general and the study of specific types of public policies. Health care, education, energy, environmental protection and social welfare.
Prerequisite: sophomore standing or higher. Offered every two years. 4 credits. (IS)

POLS-337  MASS MEDIA AND THE LAW (CROSS-LISTED WITH MSCM 337)

See MSCM 337. 4 credits.

POLS-345  MASS MEDIA, POLITICS AND PUBLIC OPINION CROSS-LISTED WITH MSCM 345)

See MSCM 345. 4 credits.

POLS-361  CURRENT DEBATES IN US FOREIGN POLICY

Formal debate course on the current problems in US foreign policy. Possible topics included: US military intervention abroad, US foreign economic policy, climate change. humanitarian intervention, weapons proliferation, immigration, democracy promotion, and regional issues.
Prerequisites: 210 and/or 384 recommended. 4 credits (IS or GP)

POLS-362  INTERNATIONAL LAW, ETHICS, AND GLOBAL GOVERNANCE

Provides introduction to international public law and the global governance arrangements that aim to address many of the world's most urgent problems, including use of force, climate change, poverty, and human rights violations. Special emphasis on moral and ethical dimensions of these issues.
Prerequisite: 210 strongly recommended. Offered fall. 4 credits. (IS or GP)

POLS-365  TOPICS IN AMERICAN POLITICS

Topics important to the study of the American political system, for example, the American Presidency, American Politics and the Culture Wars, and Why Americans Hate Politics.
Prerequisite: 210 strongly recommended. Offered every two years. 4 credits. (IS)

POLS-370  TOPICS IN INTERNATIONAL POLITICS

Exploration of various areas of international politics. Possible topics include globalization, international environmental politics, women and war, international law and human rights, advanced study of theories of international relations, U.S. foreign policy. 4 credits. (IS or GP)

POLS-371  POLITICAL PSYCHOLOGY

Explanation of political attitudes and behavior based on individual and group psychology. Various psychological theories explaining political behavior are examined, as well as a wide variety of issues including war, terrorism, leadership, voting behavior and differences in elite and mass decision making.
Prerequisite: junior standing or higher, or consent of instructor. Offered every 2-3 years. 4 credits (IS)

POLS-380  TOPICS IN POLITICAL THEORY

Advanced seminar in political theory. Varying topics such as concepts of justice, order, authority, ethics, and other subjects central to political theory.
Prerequisite: 215 (for majors) or consent of instructor. Offered fall. 4 credits. (UQ)

POLS-385  TOPICS IN COMPARATIVE POLITICS

Comparison of the major political institutions and processes of nations in the same region, or of one nation with those of the United States and other nations with which a student is familiar. Possible foci: Britain, Canada, Germany, Latin America, Africa, and Western Europe.
Prerequisite: 390 or consent of instructor. 4 credits. (IS or GP)

POLS-390  COMPARATIVE POLITICS

Domestic political systems of countries in various world regions, including Western Europe, former communist countries, and developing countries in a framework of comparative analysis. Attention to understanding how modern political systems try to resolve domestic and international problems.
Prerequisite: sophomore standing or higher. 4 credits. (IS or GP)

POLS-450  JAN TERM IN WASHINGTON DC

Opportunities to learn how Washington works, including site visits to key institutions, briefings with members of the media, study of legislative and executive branches of government, and research projects. 5 credits.

POLS-480  INDEPENDENT STUDY

For students wanting to investigate further topics of interest developed in regular courses or desiring to study material not specifically addressed in other courses. 1-5 credits.

POLS-487  EXPERIENCES IN POLITICS: INTERNSHIP

Strongly recommended during junior year. 3 credits. (Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory) (EL)

POLS-490  SENIOR SEMINAR

Capstone course in Political Science. Includes instruction on research design, appropriate research methods in different subfields, peer review workshops, professional development workshops. Successful completion requires integrative thesis paper and oral defense of research.
Prerequisites: senior standing and Political Science major status. Offered spring. 3 credits. (MWI)

Psychology

PSYC-080  RESEARCH ASSISTANTSHIP IN PSYCHOLOGY

Applied learning experience in psychologyinvolving an introduction to research throughassisting with a psychology faculty member'songoing research program. May be repeated once forcredit.1 credit (EL)

PSYC-181  INTRODUCTION TO ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY

Introduction to the classification, causes, and treatment of dysfunctional behavior, with emphasis on phenomenology, theoretical issues, and research.
Prerequisite: 101. Typically offered fall and spring. 4 credits. (IS)

PSYC-182  INTRODUCTION TO BIOPSYCHOLOGY

Introduction to the physiological, biochemical, and neuroanatomical foundations of behavior and mental processes. Attention to central nervous system function and psychoactive drug effects, sensory/perceptual processes, sleep and dreaming, learning phenomena, memory mechanisms, human communication disorders, and abnormal behavior.
Prerequisite: 101. Typically offered fall and spring. 4 credits. (NW)

PSYC-183  INTRODUCTION TO COGNITION

Exploration of theory and approaches to the study of thinking, memory, problem solving, concept formation, and related areas.
Prerequisite: 101. Typically offered fall. 4 credits. (NW)

PSYC-186  INTRO TO DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY

Study of the cognitive, physical, emotional, and interpersonal development of an individual from birth through adolescence. Issues posed by life stages and transitions, including infancy, childhood, and adolescence. Students may not receive credit for both 155 and 186.
Prerequisite: 101. Typically offered fall and spring. 4 credits. (IS)

PSYC-187  INTRODUCTION TO PERSONALITY PSYCHOLOGY

Introduction to contemporary and historical perspectives in personality psychology. Topics include trait, social-cognitive, and motivational approaches to personality; personality consistency, stability, change, and development; origins and outcomes of personality.
Prerequisite: 101. Typically offered fall and spring. 4 credits. (IS)

PSYC-188  INTRODUCTION TO SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY

The individual in social settings. Social cognition, attitudes, attributions, aggression, altruism, affiliation, conformity. Research, theory and application.
Prerequisite: 101. Typically offered spring. 4 credits. (IS)

PSYC-203  AGGRESSION & CHILDREN

Study of aggression and violence in the lives of children and adolescents. Exploration of the development of aggression, including relevant theories and research, and the effects of family and community violence on development. Lecture and discussion.
Prerequisite: 101. 4 credits.

PSYC-250  DESIGN AND ANALYSIS

Techniques for designing empirical research andanalyzing data. Experimental designs,accompanying statistical techniques.Methodological and statistical validity issues.Correlation and descriptive designs, researchethics, and research presentation. Practicalapplication via laboratory exercises.
Prerequisites: any two of the following--101, 181,182, 183, 186, 187, 188; and completion of MATH140 recommended.4 credits (QR)

PSYC-275  LEARNING

Exploration of an organism's adaptive capacity to acquire information. Use of the scientific method to explore principles and empirical phenomena of classical (Pavlovian) and instrumental/ operant conditioning. Attention also given to memory processes in primarily nonhuman animals, and the work of systematic theorists (e.g., Hull, Tolman) discussed to acquaint students with major historical figures in the field. Lecture/discussion portion of the course considers empirical findings, theories, and applications within the field of learning, while the learning simulation projects provide an opportunity for the student to see these principles in action.
Prerequisite: any one of the following: 101, 181, 182, 183, 186, 187 or 188. Offered spring of even-numbered years. 4 credits. (NW)

PSYC-285  COGNITIVE NEUROSCIENCE

Introduction to the neural bases of cognitive functioning. Examination of both lower-order functions such as perception and encoding, and higher-order functions such as memory and language, at both a cellular and systems level of analysis.
Prerequisite: any one of the following: 101, 182, 183, or BIOL 212, 213. Offered spring of even-numbered years. 4 credits. (NW)

PSYC-288  PSYCHOLOGY OF LANGUAGE

Introduction to the psychological study of language representation, development and processing. Examines issues involved in ordinary language use from a psycholinguistic point of view; including how individuals comprehend, produce and acquire language, social rules involved in language use, and the effects of second language learning on language representation. Offered spring semester of odd-numbered years. 4 credits (NW)

PSYC-325  DRUGS AND BEHAVIOR

General principles of drug effects with attention to neural mechanisms of drug action, addiction, tolerance, and drug classification. Drug use in the treatment of psychopathologies, and drug effects on learning, cognitive, and social processes. Laboratory exposure to experimental research techniques in behavioral pharmacology and descriptive research techniques in psychopharmacology. Requires work with live animals (rats and/or mice).
$35 lab fee.
Prerequisites: 250 and any one of the following: 101, 181, 182, 183, 186, 187, 188. 4 credits.

PSYC-330  SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY OF TERRORISM

Examination of psychological factors in terrorism, becoming a terrorist, suicide terrorism, and being a target of terrorist activities. Exploration of role of psychology in dealing with terrorism. Other topics as generated by students enrolled in course.
Prerequisites: 101 and junior or senior standing. Offered spring. 4 credits.

PSYC-341  MEDIA & CHILD DEVELOPMENT

The role of media in the lives of children and adolescents. Theories and current research on the effects of television, movies, magazines, music, the internet, and video games on cognitive, emotional, and social development. Topics include educational media, advertising, violent media, health behaviors, and policy issues.
Prerequisite: 250 with a grade of C- or higher, or consent of instructor. 4 credits.

PSYC-347  PSYCHOLOGY OF WOMEN AND GENDER

Current theory and research regarding the psychology of gender. Exploring psychological implications of gender in relation to biology, sexuality, and culture. Topics include (but are not limited to) research methods, achievement, the workplace, parenting, relationships, happiness, and health.
Prerequisites: 101 and an area course (181,182,183,186,187,188), or consent of instructor. Typically offered fall of even numbered years. 4 credits.

PSYC-352  CHILD & ADOLESCENT CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY

Survey of child and adolescent psychopathology and psychotherapy from a developmental perspective. Includes information on description, prevalence, etiology, prognosis, and prevention/intervention of prominent childhood disorders and related phenomena.
Prerequisite: 181 or 186. 4 credits. (IS, WI)

PSYC-362  THEORIES OF COUNSELING AND PSYCHOTHERAPY

Comparisons of major contemporary theories including: psychodynamic, behavioral, humanistic, cognitive, and family system theories. Emphasis on components of each theory, similarities and differences among theories, and application of theories described in current professional psychology literature.
Prerequisite: 181 or 187. 4 credits. (IS)

PSYC-372  PSYCHOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT: AN INTRODUCTION

Basic introduction to psychological assessment. Theories, methods, applications, and limitations of assessment in various areas. Ethical and cultural issues addressed, as well as problems of test administration, construction, and evaluation.
Prerequisites: 250 with C- or above and one area course (181, 182, 183, 186, 187, 188). 4 credits.

PSYC-381  SEMINAR IN ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY

Advanced topics in the phenomenology, classification, and integration of theory and research in the study of dysfunctional behavior, etiology, and treatment.
Prerequisites: 181, 250 with a grade of C- or higher, or consent of instructor. Typically offered fall. 4 credits. (WI)

PSYC-382  SEMINAR IN BIOPSYCHOLOGY

Physiological, biochemical, and neuroanatomical foundations of behavior and mental processes. Primary resources in basic and applied research. Laboratory experience with histological techniques for imaging the nervous system. Research into structure-function relationships in the CNS. Use of classical and operant conditioning techniques to study biological bases of learning. Requires work with live animals (rats and/or mice).
$25 lab fee.
Prerequisites: 182 and 250, or consent of instructor. Typically offered spring of odd-numbered years. 4 credits. (WI)

PSYC-383  SEMINAR IN COGNITION

Advanced study of major theories and findings of cognitive science. Topics include attention and visual search, memory, language, reasoning, expertise, problem solving, creativity, intelligence, problems in everyday living, contemporary issues in cognitive science.
Prerequisites: 183 and 250, or consent of instructor. Typically offered spring of evennumbered years. 4 credits. (WI)

PSYC-386  SEMINAR IN DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY

Examination of biological processes, cognitive processes, psychosocial processes, and their functional vs. dysfunctional components across infancy, childhood, and adolescence.
Prerequisites: 186 and 250 with a grade of C- or higher, or consent of instructor. Typically offered spring. 4 credits. (WI)

PSYC-387  SEMINAR IN PERSONALITY PSYCHOLOGY

Advanced study of research and theory in personality psychology. Focus on topics in current personality research from trait, social cognitive, and motivational perspectives.
Prerequisites: 187 and 250 with a grade of C- or higher, or consent of instructor. Typically offered fall. 4 credits. (WI)

PSYC-388  SEMINAR IN SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY

Advanced study of topics in social psychology. Social cognition and attribution theory, attitudes and cognitive consistency theories, impact of the group on the individual, self-awareness.
Prerequisite: 188 or consent of instructor. Typically offered fall. 4 credits. (WI)

PSYC-480  INDEPENDENT STUDY/RESEARCH

Student investigation of special interests or research based on a detailed statement of intent and a letter of support from the sponsoring faculty member.
Prerequisites: three psychology courses and departmental permission. No more than 10 credits to be taken as 480. 1-5 credits.

PSYC-485  SENIOR SEMINAR: ISSUES IN PSYCHOLOGY

Topics vary with instructors. Psychology staff and other faculty as resource people.
Prerequisite: senior standing or consent of instructor. 4 credits. (MWI)

PSYC-487  PSYCHOLOGY INTERNSHIP

Individualized learning in applied psychology through work in a community service agency.
Prerequisite: consent of internship supervisor. 3-5 credits. (EL)

PSYC-490  RESEARCH AND THESIS

3-5 credits

PSYC-492  RESEARCH EXPERIENCE IN PERSONALITY/SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY

Collaborative research experience in personality and/or social psychology. Discussion of research literature, refinement and implementation of a specific research idea or proposal previously developed in PSYC 387 or 388, application of research methods skills learned in PSYC 250, and practice in interpreting and presenting data. Project developed in close consultation with the professor, providing students with hands-on experiential learning about conducting research. Research projects may involve independent or team investigations.
Prerequisites: 187 and 387, or 188 and 388, or consent of instructor. 4 credits. (WI, EL)

PSYC-493  RESEARCH EXPERIENCE IN ABNORMAL/DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY

Collaborative research experience in abnormal and/ or developmental psychology. Discussion of research literature, refinement and implementation of a specific research idea or proposal previously developed in PSYC 381 or 386, application of research methods skills learned in PSYC 250, and practice in interpreting and presenting data. Project developed in close consultation with the professor, providing students with hands-on experiential learning about conducting research. Research projects may involve independent or team investigations.
Prerequisites: 181 and 381, or 186 and 386 and 250, or consent of instructor. Typically offered fall and spring 4 credits. (WI, EL)

PSYC-494  RESEARCH IN BIOPSYCHOLOGY AND COGNITIVE PSYCHOLOGY

Collaborative research experience in biopsychology and/or cognitive psychology. Discussion of research literature, refinement and implementation of a specific research idea or proposal previously developed in PSYC 382 or 383, application of research methods skills learned in PSYC 250, and practice in interpreting and presenting data. Project developed in close consultation with the professor, providing students with hands-on experiential learning about conducting research. Research projects may involve independent or team investigations.
Prerequisites: 182 and 382, or 183 and 383 and 250, or consent of instructor. Typically offered fall and spring. 4 credits. (EL)

Religious Studies

RELS-115  RELIGIOUS ETHICS

Formation and meaning of religious ethics incontemporary life. Human responsibility,community, racism, sexism, violence, war.4 credits (UQ or GP or US)

RELS-160  PHILOSOPHY EAST & WEST (CROSS-LISTED WITH PHIL 160)

Comparative introductory study of majorphilosophical traditions of east and west: ethics,metaphysics, epistemology, philosophy of religion.4 credits (UQ or GP)

RELS-200  NEW TESTAMENT GREEK

Study of Greek grammar; readings from the NewTestament; use of exegetical tools. With 201(Greek Readings), meets the language requirementfor the BA.5 credits

RELS-201  GREEK READINGS

Greek from the New Testament, Stoic authors,Hellenistic Jewish texts, and early churchfathers.
Prerequisite: 200.3 credits

RELS-202  HEBREW I

Elements of Hebrew grammar. Language tapes and class exercises to give the student experience in spoken, elementary, Modern Hebrew; readings from prose sections of the Hebrew Bible. With 203, meets the language requirement for the BA. 5 credits.

RELS-203  HEBREW II: READINGS IN BIBLE

Selected passages from the prose and poetry of the Hebrew Bible.
Prerequisite: 202. 3 credits.

RELS-220  CHRISTIANITY

Prominent people, movements, and doctrines within Christianity. Special attention to primary source materials and biographies. 4 credits. (UQ or VP)

RELS-230  RELIGIOUS THINKERS

Exposition of contemporary theologians throughprimary reading sources.4 credits (UQ)

RELS-254  FOLKLORE AND MYTHOLOGY (CROSS-LISTED WITH ANTH 254)

See ANTH 254. 4 credits.

RELS-260  DEAD SEA SCROLLS

The discovery, content, and historical context of the Dead Sea Scrolls. What the Scrolls tell us about Second Temple Judaism, the origins of Christianity, the history of the biblical text, the Qumran community. Making the scrolls available to the general public. Not open to those who have taken INQS 125: The Dead Sea Scrolls. 4 credits. (UQ or VP)

RELS-265  JOHN AND THE GNOSTIC GOSPELS

Examination of the Gnostic Christian texts discovered at Nag Hammadi, Egypt, as context for the Gospel of John. Topics include: the variety of early Christian communities; roles of women in early Christian churches; the so-called Q Document; the politics of Christian canon formation; the Gospel of John as an orthodox response to Gnostic Christians. Not open to those who have taken INQS 125: John and the Gnostic Gospels. 4 credits. (UQ or VP)

RELS-310  HISTORY OF RELIGION OF THE MIDDLE EAST (CROSS-LISTED WITH HIST 310)

Prominent periods and events in the formation and development of the three major religious traditions of the Middle East: Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Historical context, the prophet, conquest and empire, crisis and disaster, Holy Text.
Prerequisite: sophomore standing or higher. 4 credits. (UQ or VP or GP)

RELS-315  POLITICS AND RELIGION (CROSS-LISTED WITH POLS 315)

Examination of the relationship between politics &religion in varying contexts: theories of the roleof religion in government and society, religioussocial movements, contemporary politicalcontroversies involving religion.
Prerequisite: POLS 201, 210, or 220; or RELS 110or 115, or consent of instructor.4 credits

RELS-320  PILGRIMAGES: SACRED JOURNEYS

A study of the role and practices of pilgrimages in major religious traditions. Exploration of symbolic pilgrimages including the use of labyrinths. Relevance for personal practice and sacred journeys. 4 credits. (UQ or GP)

RELS-325  FORGIVENESS AND RECONCILIATION

A study of the theology, role and practices of forgiveness in four major religious traditions: Buddhism, Judaism, Islam, and Christianity. Includes examination of forgiveness, revenge, reconciliation and restorative justice. Case studies will focus on individuals, group/cultures, and national contexts. Relevance for personal practice will be explored. 4 credits. (UQ)

RELS-340  MONKS AND MYSTICS

Study of western monasticism and the way of the mystic. Focus on Trappists, their community and spiritual disciplines. Visits to Trappist Abbey, dialogue with monks. Additional trip to Brigittine monastery and Benedictine convent. Academic reflection and personal exploration. 4 credits. (UQ)

RELS-380  BUDDHISM

Examination of Buddhist teachings on the cause of suffering and its mitigation. Four Noble Truths, Dependent Causation, meditation, scriptures, the Sangha, Mahayana and Theravada Buddhism, Pure Land, Tibetan, and Zen groups. Buddhism in America. 4 credits. (UQ or GP)

RELS-383  TIBETAN BUDDHISM

Introduction to Buddhism of Tibet and the Tibetan diaspora communities, particularly in India and the Himalayan region (Nepal, Bhutan, etc.), as well as that of westerners (Americans, Europeans, Australians, etc.) who identify themselves as Buddhist within a specifically Tibetan tradition. Basic Tibetan Buddhist doctrines and practices, institutions and identity formation, historically and in a contemporary context. 4 credits. (UQ or GP)

RELS-435  DEATH & DYING

American ways of death and dying. Cultural immorality, obscenity, confrontation, technicalities, realities, living. 4 credits. (UQ)

RELS-439  PEER INSTRUCTION: RELIGIOUS STUDIES

Advanced opportunity for outstanding students to assist faculty members in the classroom. Typically involves tutoring in a language course or introductory content course. Focus on course content and pedagogy.
Prerequisites: application and consent of instructor. 1-4 credits. (Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory) (EL)

RELS-480  INDEPENDENT STUDY

Independent study for students of advanced standing under the supervision of departmental faculty.
Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 1-5 credits.

RELS-485  SENIOR SEMINAR

First course of departmental capstone sequence. Examination of academic approaches to the understanding of religious phenomena. Focus on theories and methods of analysis. Leads to completion of a proposal for the senior thesis.
Prerequisite: consent of department. 4 credits.

RELS-487  INTERNSHIP

Individualized learning in applied religion through working in a church, synagogue, temple, or other institution related to a denomination or ecumenical group. Letter grades.
Prerequisite: consent of department. 4 credits. (EL)

RELS-490  SENIOR THESIS

Second course of departmental capstone sequence. Advanced research and writing in consultation with one or more members of the department.
Prerequisites: 485 and senior standing. 4 credits (MWI)

Sociology and Anthropology

SOAN-040  COMMUNITY SERVICE

Community service activity, helping with such social services as nursing home care, tutoring, family recreation programs, juvenile corrections, special day schools. Requires 40 hours of service. May be repeated for credit.
Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 1 credit. (EL)

SOAN-210  SPORT, PHILOSOPHY AND SOCIETY (CROSS- LISTED WITH PHIL 210)

Role of sport in contemporary political, economic, and social issues; sport as cultural representation; sport and deviance; sport and socialization; sport and the reproduction of social inequality (race, class, gender, and sexual orientation); sport and imperialism. 4 credits. (UQ)

SOAN-221  RELIGION, SOCIETY AND CULTURE

Examines religion and religious belief as a social phenomenon. Focuses on the relationship between society and religion, and the role that religion plays in individuals' lives, with special emphasis on the larger social and cultural context of religious belief and expression in the United States. Topics to be considered include: belief and its institutionalization, religion as a social form, forms of religious organization, religion and social change, politics and religion, fundamentalism, religion in popular culture, secularization, and the shifting boundaries of religious and non-religious activity. 4 credits. (IS or UQ)

SOAN-222  MEXICO, CENTRAL AMERICA & THE CARIBBEAN: SOCIETIES AND CULTURES

Social organizations and cultures of Mexico, Central America, and the Caribbean. Patterns of economic, political, and social organization, including ethnicity, gender, race, class, and other social cleavages. Migration to the United States and effects on U.S. society, including Latinas and Latinos, Rastafarian influences, and U.S. migration policy. 4 credits. (IS or GP)

SOAN-226  SOUTH AMERICA: PEOPLES ABD CULTURES OF THE LEAST KNOW CONTINENT

Social organization, cultures, and histories of the diverse peoples of South America. Current patterns of economic, political, and social organization, including countryside and cities; ethnic, class, and other social cleavages; local, national, and international levels of integration. 4 credits. (IS or GP)

SOAN-229  CONTEMPORARY CHINESE SOCIETY

Overview of Chinese society, drawing on insights from anthropology, sociology, history, political science, religion, gender studies, and economics. Continuity and change in Chinese cultural traditions and the unity and diversity of Chinese culture both within Chinese national borders and with overseas Chinese. Orientalism, religion, marriage, kinship, gender, ethnicity, traditional medicine, understandings of the body, the usefulness of a "timeless Chinese" concept, and the possibility of a Chinese sense of self. 4 credits. (IS or GP)

SOAN-230  PEOPLES AND CULTURES OF SOUTH ASIA

Peoples and cultures from Afghanistan to Thailand, their social, economic, and religious institutions, regional disputes and conflicts. Forces for change, urban and rural strategies for survival and development, roles of women. 4 credits.

SOAN-232  MEDICINE AND CULTURE

Cultural bases of illness and curing; ethnographic examination of how non-Western societies perceive and treat illness and how knowledge of non-Western practices can be used to critique and inform the management of our own health problems. Meanings of sickness, nature of relationships between patients and healers, and effects of culture on health. 4 credits. (IS or GP)

SOAN-240  UTOPIAS/DYSTOPIAS

Exploration of theory of utopic and dystopic thought, social theory and their representation in works of science fiction. Specific areas of focus include gender and sex, sexual orientation, race, societal structure, war, terrorism, peace, inequality and political theory. 4 credits. (IS or UQ)

SOAN-244  THE OTHER EUROPE

Marginalized populations of the European subcontinent and their cultures in historical and anthropological perspective: East Europeans, Basques, Roma, Jews, Irish, recent Asian and African immigrants, and European underclasses. Views of pre-modern and modern European Civilization from core and periphery. Other Europeans and the U.S. 4 credits. (IS or GP)

SOAN-250  ENVIRONMENTAL SOCIOLOGY (also listed as ENVS 250)

Relationship between social groups and natural and human-built environment, human-induced environmental decline, sustainable alternatives, environmentalism as social movement, public environmental opinion, environmental racism and classism. Social dimensions of built environment including urban sprawl, development, place, space, community, and urban design. 4 credits. (IS)

SOAN-251  SOCIOLOGY OF MUSIC SUBCULTURES

Sociological and Anthropological investigation of music subcultures in modern society. Focus on the social and cultural significance of popular and folk music genres with a particular emphasis on sociological theories of representation, identity, community, subculture, tradition, authenticity, and social change. Emphasis on social institutions, social interaction, and their interrelationship. 4 credits. (CS)

SOAN-275  TOPICS: OTHER AMERICANS

A field-based topics course submerging students in a marginal or counter-cultural community. Methodological training in field research. May be repeated with consent of instructor. 4 credits. (IS or US)

SOAN-280  FAMILIES IN COMPARTV PERSPECT

Examines the family as a social institution, both domestically and globally. Addresses historical and cultural perspectives, with emphasis on family diversity, variations in family form and life style, and the interdependence between family and other institutions. Analysis of major family issues, as well as forces for change in the family. 4 credits. (IS or US)

SOAN-307  SOCIAL RESEARCH METHODS

For future researchers and consumers of research. Designs for research on social behavior, data collection, and analysis; reporting results; funding of research; uses of research in social work, government, and management. Four hours of lecture and three hours of lab each week. Includes laboratory.
Prerequisite: 101 or ANTH 111. 5 credits. (QR)

SOAN-330  SOCIOLOGY OF COMMUNITY

Examines the social science concept of community and its context in rural life. Focus on the intersection of rural and urban cultures. Issues covered include racial and cultural diversity, globalization and rural communities, urban-rural migration, community identity and change, community building, and community survival. Experiential component focusing on local region.
Prerequisites: SOCL 101 or ANTH 111. 4 credits. (IS)

SOAN-350  GLOBAL POLITICAL ECONOMY: SOCIAL AND CULTURAL PERSPECTIVES

Understanding economic behavior in nonindustrial societies by locating it in its wider social and cultural setting. Survey of major theoretical positions and review of concrete cases; issues arising from ongoing incorporation of formerly autonomous economies into dominant world system.
Prerequisite: SOCL 101 or ANTH 111 or consent of instructor. 4 credits.

SOAN-375  CITY AND COUNTRYSIDE IN TRANSITION

Local socio-cultural organization in state societies, using ethnographic field methods to explore such topics as ethnicity and tribalism, patron-client relations and brokers, the interrelation of formal institutions and informal social relations, and the tension between urban and rural societies.
$50 lab fee.
Prerequisite: SOCL 101 or ANTH 111. 4 credits. (IS)

SOAN-385  SEMINAR: SOCIAL THEORY

Junior-level seminar focusing on the major intellectual currents leading to the development of the sciences of culture, society, and human social behavior. Four hours of lecture and two hours of lab each week.
Prerequisites: SOCL 101 or ANTH 111, and junior standing. 5 credits.

SOAN-404  SOCIAL MOVEMENT, CITIZENSHIP & DISSENT

Social movements in cross-cultural perspective ranging from microsociological to macrosociological. Political, economic, gender, religious, racial, and lifestyle issues that have been a focus of collective activity in promoting or resisting change on a sociocultural level. Resource mobilization, the J-curve theory of revolution, class conflict, urban social movements, identity construction, new social movements, and issues of citizenship and dissent.
Prerequisites: SOCL 101 or ANTH 111, SOAN 307 and 385. 4 credits. (MWI)

SOAN-439  PEER INSTRUCTION

Opportunity for outstanding students to assist faculty in the classroom and laboratory. May not be repeated for credit.
Prerequisites: Application and consent of instructor. 3-5 credits. (Satisfactory/ Unsatisfactory) (EL)

SOAN-454  SYMBOLS IN SOCIETY AND CULTURE

Study of world cultures as systems of symbols and the process by which people give meaning to their world and their action in it. Critical examination of theoretical models used in the analysis of a variety of semantic domains: ritual, myth, media, popular culture, folklore, politics, and the self.
Prerequisites: SOCL 101 or ANTH 111, SOAN 307, and 385. 4 credits. (MWI)

SOAN-456  SOCIO-CULTURAL CHANGE: TRANSFORMATION, COLLAPSE, REBIRTH

Understanding transformations underway in late modernity which may presage collapse; survey of major theoretical positions and concrete cases to discern patterns and processes involved in transformation, collapse and rebirth of complex societies; causes and consequences of societal collapse, including what actually "collapses" when collapse happens.
Prerequisites: SOCL 101 or ANTH 111, SOAN 307 and 385. 4 credits. (MWI)

SOAN-460  GENDER, SEXUALITY AND THE BODY

Gender, sexuality, and the body as focus for both independent and interrelated areas of scholarship using several theoretical perspectives; examination of ethnographic materials from a wide variety of cultural contexts.
Prerequisites: SOCL 101 or ANTH 111, SOAN 307 and 385. 4 credits. (MWI)

SOAN-465  SELF AND SOCIETY

Examines the concept and notion of the self and identity through a symbolic interaction perspective, particularly on how the self is affected in a given social context. Major areas of focus include education, gender, race, and community/ nation.
Prerequisites: SOCL 101 or ANTH 111, SOAN 307, and 385. 4 credits. (MWI)

SOAN-480  INDEPENDENT STUDY

Study of special topics not available as courses. For advanced students.
Prerequisites: approval of supervising instructor and department chair. 1-5 credits.

SOAN-485  SENIOR PROSEMINAR I: THEORY AND PRACTICE

Capstone course for graduating seniors focusing on the practice of sociology and anthropology. Work includes preparation of portfolios, self-assessment on the meeting of departmental goals, research into graduate school opportunities and other career options, organization of SOAN Tables, teaching in other classes and public presentations, discussion of the relationship between social theory and practice and independent theoretical readings.
Prerequisites: SOCL 101 or ANTH 111, SOAN 385, and senior standing or consent of instructor. Offered fall, spring. 4 credits (2 per semester).

SOAN-486  SENIOR PROSEMINAR II: THEORY AND PRACTICE

Capstone course for graduating seniors focusing onthe practice of sociology and anthropology. Workincludes preparation of portfolios, self-assessment on the meeting of departmental goals,research into graduate school opportunities andother career options, organization of SOAN Tables,teaching in other classes and public presenta-tions, discussion of the relationship betweensocial theory and practice and independenttheoretical readings.
Prerequisites: SOCL 101 or ANTH 111; SOAN 385, andsenior standing or consent of instructor.Offered fall, spring.4 credits (2 per semester/see SOAN 485)

Sociology and Anthropology - Anthropology

ANTH-203  HUMAN ADAPTIVE STRATEGIES

Social scientific findings and ways of understanding humanitys place in nature and our current ecological predicament; causes and consequences (environmental, demographic, economic, political and cultural) of humankinds transition from food foraging to Neolithic and now industrial adaptive strategies; scientific, policy and cultural implications and aspects of these changes and interactions through case studies at global, regional and local scales.
$60 lab fee. Offered spring. 4 credits (IS or GP)

ANTH-255  MUSEUMS: OBJECTS & ARTIFACTS

Introduction to the modern museum and museum work. Historical context and types of museums. Collecting, interpreting, and preserving objects of artistic, cultural, and scientific value. Field trips to museums and laboratory training in association with the Linfield Anthropology Museum. Includes laboratory. 3 credits. (CS)

ANTH-290  PLANTS AND SOCIETY (CROSS-LISTED WITH BIOL 290)

4 credits. (NW)

ANTH-340  INTRODUCTION TO LINGUISTICS (CROSS- LISTED WITH MDLA 340)

See MDLA 340. 3 credits.

ANTH-355  MUSEUMS: EXHIBITING CULTURES

Anthropology museums in their historical and sociological context. Critical examination of artifact collections, exhibits, and exhibiting theories as representative of cultural values and social conflicts. Museums and the politics of culture. Field trips to Northwest museums and preparation of Linfield Anthropology Museum exhibits.
$25 lab fee. Includes laboratory.
Prerequisite: 111. Recommended: 255. 4 credits. (CS)

ANTH-410  TOPICS IN PHYSICAL ANTHROPOLOGY AND ARCHAEOLOGY

Field- and laboratory-based course with focus on such selected topics as primate studies, ancient estuary environments, and archaeology of the Holy Land. May be repeated once for credit with different content. Includes laboratory.
Prerequisites: 112, SOAN 307, and 385. 4 credits.

Sociology and Anthropology - Sociology

SOCL-206  SOCIAL WORK PRACTICE

Methods of social work with individuals, families,and other groups, from intake interview totermination. Ways social workers use private,voluntary, and government resources. Practicalproblems and the skills needed to accomplishobjectives within the limits of laws and policies.3 credits

SOCL-297  TOPICS IN APPLIED SOCIOLOGY AND SOCIAL WORK

Introductory-level course focusing on key issues in social work and applied sociology, such as addictions, homelessness, domestic violence, and poverty. May be repeated once for credit with different content.
Prerequisite: 101 or consent of instructor. 3 credits. (IS)

SOCL-335  SOCIOLOGY OF EDUCATION

Examines the sociological principles that relate to education in the United States. Topics include theoretical approaches to education, stratification, adolescent behavior and subcultures, the relationship between education and other institutions, and educational reform.
Prerequisite: 101 or consent of instructor. 4 credits. (IS or US)

SOCL-370  SOCIETY, STATE AND SOCIAL POLICY

Analysis of the complexities of social policy in the U.S. Strategies for examining social policy; role of government and outside forces in forming policy. Several current policies discussed.
Prerequisite: 101. 4 credits. (IS or US)

Theater and Communication Arts - Theatre

THTR-010  THEATRE PRACTICUM PRODUCTION 1

Paracurricular version of 110. 1 credit. (EL)

THTR-012  THEATRE PRACTICUM: PRODUCTION 2

Paracurricular version 112. 1 credit. (EL)

THTR-013  THEATRE PRACTICUM: PRODUCTION 3

Paracurricular version of 113. 1 credit. (EL)

THTR-014  THEATRE PRACTICUM: PRODUCTION 4

Paracurricular version 114. 1 credit. (EL)

THTR-020  THEATRE PRACTICUM: ACTING 1

Paracurricular version of 120. 1 credit. (EL)

THTR-021  THEATRE PRACTICUM: ACTING 2

Paracurricular version of 121. 1 credit. (EL)

THTR-022  THEATRE PRACTICUM: ACTING 3

Paracurricular version of 122. 1 credit. (EL)

THTR-023  THEATRE PRACTICUM: ACTING 4

Paracurricular version of 123. 1 credit. (EL)

THTR-110  THEATRE PRACTICUM: PRODUCTION 1

Laboratory experience in theatre production with focus on design and technical theatre. Requires participation on one or more production crews for major theatre presentations. Specific work assignments vary by semester and production. 1 credit (EL)

THTR-112  THEATRE PRACTICUM: PRODUCTION 2

Second-level laboratory experience in theatre production with focus on design and technical theatre. Requires participation on one or more production crews for major theatre presentations. Specific work assignments vary by semester and production. 1 credit. (EL)

THTR-113  THEATRE PRACTICUM: PRODUCTION 3

Third-level laboratory experience in theatre production with focus on design and technical theatre. Requires participation on one or more production crews for major theatre presentations. Specific work assignments vary by semester and production. 1 credit. (EL)

THTR-114  THEATRE PRACTICUM: PRODUCTION 4

Fourth-level laboratory experience in theatre production with focus on design and technical theatre. Requires participation on one or more production crews for major theatre presentations. Specific work assignments vary by semester and production. 1 credit. (EL)

THTR-120  THEATRE PRACTICUM: ACTING 1

Participation in experiential activity of acting in major Linfield College theatre production. Application of skills learned in 181 and other acting courses. Development of actor as one facet of production ensemble. 1 credit. (EL)

THTR-121  THEATRE PRACTICUM: ACTING 2

Participation in experiential activity of acting in major Linfield College theatre production. Second-level application of skills learned in 181 and other acting courses. Development of actor as one facet of production ensemble. 1 credit. (EL)

THTR-122  THEATRE PRACTICUM: ACTING 3

Participation in experiential activity of acting in major Linfield College theatre production. Third-level application of skills learned in 181 and other acting courses. Development of actor as one facet of production ensemble. 1 credit. (EL)

THTR-123  THEATRE PRACTICUM: ACTING 4

Participation in experiential activity of acting in major Linfield College theatre production. Fourth-level application of skills learned in 181 and other acting courses. Development of actor as one facet of production ensemble. 1 credit. (EL)

THTR-162  FUNDAMENTALS OF THEATRE DESIGN AND DRAWING

Exploration of design elements common to scenic, costume, and lighting design and the visual processes necessary for communicating these elements, including sketching, drafting, and rendering.
$60 fee. Offered fall. 3 credits. (CS)

THTR-170  INTRODUCTION TO THEATRE

Audience-based approach to theatre that develops observational skills and perceptions in order to enhance students' understanding and enjoyment of theatre events. Introduction to acting, directing, dramatic structure and form, and technical theatre.
$40 fee. 3 credits. (CS)

THTR-181  ACTING

Fundamentals of acting, including techniques that free the actor, basic skills needed to communicate inner truth, analysis of roles, interdependence of all people on stage. Public performance of final scenes. Appropriate for both majors and non-majors. 3 credits. (CS)

THTR-185  STAGECRAFT

Principles and methods of stagecraft as used in theatre and other productions. Two- and three-dimensional scenery, production organization, and safety. Lecture, discussion, and laboratory work.
$40 fee. Offered spring. 3 credits. (CS)

THTR-210  THEATRE PRACTICUM: PRODUCTION 5

Advanced laboratory experience in theatre production focusing on design and technical theatre. Participation on one or more production crews for major theatre presentations. May include crew head or assistant technical director responsibilities.
Prerequisite: one 100-level theatre production practicum course. 1 credit. (EL)

THTR-211  THEATRE PRACTICUM: PRODUCTION 6

Second-level advanced laboratory experience in theatre production focusing on design and technical theatre. Participation on one or more production crews for major theatre presentations. May include crew head or assistant technical director responsibilities.
Prerequisites: one 100-level theatre production practicum course and 210. 1 credit. (EL)

THTR-212  THEATRE PRACTICUM: THEATRE PRODUCTION STAFF ASSISTANT 1

Participation as assistant director or assistant dramaturg on theatre production staff for one major theatre presentation. Application of principles from 370. Intense experiential activity that also requires research and creative contributions appropriate to the role and in support of director.
Prerequisites: 370 and consent of instructor. 1 credit.

THTR-213  THEATRE PRACTICUM: PRODUCTION STAFF ASSISTANT 2

Participation as assistant scenic designer, assistant lighting designer, assistant costume designer, or assistant sound designer on theatre production staff for one major theatre presentation. Application of principles from 380, 385, 390 and/or 466. Intense experiential activity that also requires research and creative contributions appropriate to role and in support of designer.
Prerequisites: 380, 385, 390 or 466 (Topics: Sound Design) as appropriate, and consent of instructor. 1 credit. (EL)

THTR-270  PLAY READING AND ANALYSIS

Directed reading of classical and contemporary plays. Provides an introduction to dramatic literature and various approaches to play analysis. 1 credit.

THTR-281  INTERMEDIATE ACTING

A second acting course to broaden and polish performance skills. Emphasis on motivation, physicalization, development of vocal instrument and use of dialects, auditioning and beginning media acting skills. Public performance required. Open to all students. Three lecture/lab sessions per week.
$40 fee. Offered spring of even-numbered years.
Prerequisite: 181. 3 credits. (CS)

THTR-290  STAGE MAKEUP

Makeup for stage, including materials and procedures, character interpretation, design creation, and application.
$60 fee. Offered spring of odd-numbered years. 2 credits.

THTR-295  THEATRE BUSINESS AND PROMOTIONS

Theatre organization and management. Promotional methods for theatre. Includes budget costing and purchasing, ticket management, box office procedures, visuals, promotional methods, and program development. Offered fall of odd-numbered years. 2 credits.

THTR-314  THEATRE PRACTICUM: STAGE MGMNT 1

Participation as stage manager on theatre production staff for one major theatre presentation during semester. Application of principles from THTR 365. Intense experiential activity that also requires research and creative contributions.
Prerequisites: 365 and consent of instructor. 1-2 credits.

THTR-315  THEATRE PRACTICUM: STAGE MANAGING 2

Participation as stage manager on theatre production staff for one major theatre presentation during the semester. Second-level application of principles from 365. Intense experiential activity that also requires research and creative contributions.
Prerequisites: 365 and consent of instructor. 1-2 credits.

THTR-316  THEATRE PRACTICUM: DESIGN

Participation as scenic designer, lighting designer, costume designer, or sound designer on the production staff for a major theatre presentation. Application of principles from THTR 380, 385 and/or 390. Intense experiential activity for the exceptional student with demonstrated talent in design.
Prerequisites: 380, 385, or 390 as appropriate, 212, and invitation of the faculty. 2-3 credits.

THTR-317  THEATRE PRACTICUM: DIRECTING

Participation as director for a major theatre presentation. Application of principles from THTR 370 and 371. Intense experiential activity for the exceptional student with demonstrated talent in directing.
Prerequisites: 212, 370, 371 and invitation of the faculty. 2-3 credits.

THTR-320  THEATRE PRACTICUM: ADVANCED ACTING

Participation as actor in a "major" role (as determined by the faculty) in a main stage presentation. Application of principles from THTR 181 and 281.
Prerequisites: 181, 281, invitation of the faculty, and successful casting in a production by participating in the audition process. 2-3 credits.

THTR-365  STAGE MANAGEMENT

Theory and practice in procedures used to organize, mount, run, and strike a production, including responsibilities during rehearsals for crew assignments, scheduling, and performance operations. Offered spring of even-numbered years. 2 credits.

THTR-370  PLAY DIRECTING

The director's tasks in preparing, rehearsing, and mounting a show. Play analysis, casting, scheduling, blocking, business, picturization, and polishing. Three lecture/lab sessions per week.
$45 fee.
Prerequisites: 181, Theatre Arts major or minor status, or consent of instructor. Offered fall of odd-numbered years. 3 credits.

THTR-371  ADVANCED DIRECTING

Practical application of principles from 370. Examination of advanced directing theory and practice, including varied stylistic approaches and conventions. Includes public performance integrating theatrical production elements. Three lecture/lab sessions per week.
$45 fee.
Prerequisites: Theatre major, successful completion of 370 (course work and final project), application, and consent of theatre instructors. Offered spring of even-numbered years with sufficient student interest and departmental resources. 3 credits.

THTR-380  SCENE DESIGN

Visual interpretation of play scripts and thematic ideas, including concept development, advanced drafting and rendering techniques, and model building. Designs for proscenium, thrust, and arena stage. Lecture, discussion, lab.
$180 fee.
Prerequisites: 162 and 185, or consent of instructor. Offered spring of odd-numbered years. 3 credits. (CS)

THTR-385  LIGHTING DESIGN

Principles of design, electricity, lighting instrument function and maintenance, script analysis and concept development, control systems, drafting and lighting theory for stage performances. Lecture, discussion and laboratory work.
$25 fee.
Prerequisites: 162 and 380, or consent of instructor. Offered spring of even-numbered years. 3 credits. (CS)

THTR-390  COSTUME DESIGN

Theories and techniques of design for visual interpretation of the playscript, including study of principles of line, silhouette, texture. Study of relationships among historical context, characterization and costume. Lecture, discussion and laboratory work.
$125 fee.
Prerequisite: 162 or consent of instructor. Offered fall of even-numbered years. 3 credits. (CS)

THTR-466  TOPICS IN THEATRE DESIGN AND TECHNOLOGY

Advanced design and technology studio course for majors and minors. Developing specialized scenographic talents and techniques through topics such as scene painting, model-making in theatrical design, sound, and computer technology in the theatre. Offered every 2-3 years as resources permit. May be repeated once for credit with different content.
$30 fee.
Prerequisites: 162 and consent of instructor. 3 credits.

THTR-470  THEATRE HISTORY AND LITERATURE I

Development of Western and major non-Western theatre traditions to 1700, including sociological, philosophical, and cultural foundations of each major period; dramatic literature; physical stage and production techniques; major critical theories.
$45 fee.
Prerequisite: junior standing or higher. Offered fall of even-numbered years. 4 credits. (CS or VP, MWI)

THTR-473  THEATRE HISTORY AND LITERATURE II

Development of Western and major non-Western theatre traditions from 1700 to the present, including sociological, philosophical, and cultural foundations of each major period and aesthetic movement; dramatic literature; physical stage and production techniques.
$45 fee.
Prerequisite: junior standing or higher. Offered spring of odd-numbered years. 4 credits. (CS or VP, MWI)

THTR-475  AMERICAN MUSICAL THEATER

History and analysis of American musical theatre as exemplified primarily by the Broadway stage. Major forms that contributed to the contemporary musical theatre, including opera, operetta, minstrels, vaudeville, and revue. Offered in the Adult Degree Program and, as resources permit, on the McMinnville campus. 3 credits.

THTR-481  TOPICS IN THEATRE PERFORMANCE

Advanced studio acting for majors and minors. Focus on specialized acting styles and techniques through topics such as acting Shakespeare, farce, ancient tragedy, mime, performance art, and improvisation. Three lecture/lab sessions per week. Offered every 2-3 years as resources permit. May be repeated once for credit with different content.
$45 fee.
Prerequisites: 181 and 281, or consent of instructor. 3 credits. (CS)

THTR-489  SENIOR CAPSTONE SEMINAR

Capstone course focusing on the holistic and collaborative practice of theatre. Includes selfassessment, preparation of portfolios, research into graduate school opportunities, internships and other career options, development of an article of "publishable" quality tailored to the interest of the student, public demonstration of skills through formal oral presentation of electronic portfolio.
Prerequisite: senior standing. Offered fall. 3 credits. (WI)

Theatre and Communication Arts

TACA-040  COMMUNITY SERVICE

Community service activity at an appropriate organization as arranged through the department by individual students.
Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 1 credit. (EL)

TACA-287  INTERNSHIP

Supervised work at an appropriate organization as arranged through the department by individual students. Theatre internships in production, front-of-house, or performance activities. Communication Arts internships in the areas of intercultural, interpersonal, political, organizational, or public communication.
Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 1-3 credits. (EL)

TACA-439  PEER INSTRUCTION

Advanced opportunity for outstanding students to assist faculty members in the classroom or laboratory. Focus on course content and pedagogy.
Prerequisites: application and consent of instructor. 3 credits. (Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory) (EL)

TACA-480  INDEPENDENT STUDY

Advanced study in Theatre or Communication Arts arranged with a professor and approved by the director of the area of study.
Prerequisite: consent of department chair. 1-3 credits.

TACA-487  CAPSTONE INTERNSHIP

Supervised work at an appropriate organization as arranged individually through the department. Theatre internships in production or performing activities. Communication Arts internships in the areas of intercultural, interpersonal, political, organizational, or public communication. Includes reflective paper. Elective experience for exceptional students. May not be repeated.
Prerequisites: senior standing and invitation of the faculty. 2-3 credits. (EL)

Theatre and Communication Arts - Communication Arts

TCCA-027  PERFORMANCE EVENTS PRACTICUM 1

Paracurricular version of 127. 1 credit. (EL)

TCCA-028  PERFORMANCE EVENTS PRACTICUM 2

Paracurricular version of 128. 1 credit. (EL)

TCCA-029  PERFORMANCE EVENTS PRACTICUM 3

Paracurricular version of 129. 1 credit. (EL)

TCCA-051  PUBLIC SPEAKING EVENTS PRACTICUM 1

Paracurricular version of 151. 1 credit. (EL)

TCCA-052  PUBLIC SPEAKING EVENTS PRACTICUM 2

Paracurricular version of 152. 1 credit. (EL)

TCCA-053  PUBLIC SPEAKING EVENTS PRACTICUM 3

Paracurricular version of 153. 1 credit. (EL)

TCCA-057  DEBATE PRACTICUM 1

Paracurricular version of course 157. 1credit. (EL)

TCCA-058  DEBATE PRACTICUM 2

Paracurricular version of 158. 1 credits. (EL)

TCCA-059  DEBATE PRACTICUM 3

Paracurricular version of 159. 1 credit. (EL)

TCCA-127  PERFORMANCE EVENTS PRACTICUM 1

Active participation in the Linfield Forensics Program through practice sessions and level one competition in performance of literature events at intercollegiate tournaments. Focus on improving skills in dramatic and humorous performance. 1 credit. (EL)

TCCA-128  PERFORMANCE EVENTS PRACTICUM 2

Active participation in the Linfield Forensics Program through practice sessions and level two competition in performance of literature events at intercollegiate tournaments. Focus on improving skills in dramatic and humorous performance. 1 credit. (EL)

TCCA-129  PERFORMANCE EVENTS PRACTICUM 3

Active participation in the Linfield Forensics Program through practice sessions and level three competition in performance of literature events at intercollegiate tournaments. Focus on improving skills in dramatic and humorous performance. 1 credit. (EL)

TCCA-130  INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATION

Theory and application of skills in relational communication. Emphasis on self-awareness, listening, verbal and nonverbal codes, role competency, conflict management. 3 credits. (IS)

TCCA-140  PUBLIC SPEAKING

Effective and ethical presentation of ideas to an audience. Issues of First Amendment rights and responsibilities and the role of persuasive discourse in effecting individual and societal change. Theory and practice of audience adaptation, message organization, language use, and delivery. Classroom speeches and evaluation. 3 credits. (IS)

TCCA-151  PUBLIC SPEAKING EVENTS PRACTICUM 1

Active participation in the Linfield Forensics Program through practice sessions and level one public speaking competition at intercollegiate tournaments. Focus on improving skills in speech writing and delivery, and impromptu speaking. 1 credit. (EL)

TCCA-152  PUBLIC SPEAKING EVENTS PRACTICUM 2

Active participation in the Linfield Forensics Program through practice sessions and level two public speaking competition at intercollegiate tournaments. Focus on improving skills in speech writing and delivery, and impromptu speaking. 1 credit. (EL)

TCCA-153  PUBLIC SPEAKING EVENTS PRACTICUM 3

Active participation in the Linfield Forensics Program through practice sessions and level three public speaking competition at intercollegiate tournaments. Focus on improving skills in speech writing and delivery, and impromptu speaking. 1 credit. (EL)

TCCA-157  DEBATE PRACTICUM 1

Active participation in the Linfield Forensics Program through practice sessions and level one debate competition at intercollegiate tournaments. Focus on improving argumentation techniques, speaking skills, and current events knowledge. 1 credit. (EL)

TCCA-158  DEBATE PRACTICUM 2

Active participation in the Linfield Forensics Program through practice sessions and level two debate competition at intercollegiate tournaments. Focus on improving argumentation techniques, speaking skills, and current events knowledge. 1 credit. (EL)

TCCA-159  DEBATE PRACTICUM 3

Active participation in the Linfield Forensics Program through practice sessions and level three debate competition at intercollegiate tournaments. Focus on improving argumentation techniques, speaking skills, and current events knowledge. 1 credit. (EL)

TCCA-220  PERFORMING LITERATURE

Performance studies approach to performing literature. Analysis and performance of selections from various literary genres with emphasis on works of diverse voices in U.S. literature. Offered spring semester. 3 credits. (CS or US)

TCCA-230  INTERCULTURAL COMMUNICATION: GLOBAL PERSPECTIVES

Theory and practice of human communication in a multicultural world. Interdisciplinary and global perspectives on social and cultural contexts of communication. Emphasis on perception, values, enculturation, acculturation, verbal and nonverbal language systems, strategies for effective intercultural interaction. Strongly recommended for students planning to participate in Linfield's Study Abroad programs. 3 credits. (IS or GP)

TCCA-233  MULITCULTURAL COMMUNICATION IN THE UNITED STATES

Theory and practice of human communication in a multicultural world. Emphasis on dynamics of human interaction within and across co-cultures in the United States. Development of communication skills to deal effectively with cultural identity and diversity. Offered spring. 3 credits. (IS or US)

TCCA-255  FOUNDATIONAL THEORIES OF RHETORIC AND COMMUNICATION

Introduction to foundational theories of rhetoric and communication. Examination of how humans use or manipulate symbols to convey information, influence attitudes and beliefs, and engender action. Focus on understanding connections between communication and thought, particularly societal values and ethics, the nature of knowledge, and the nature of being and reality. Application of theory to contemporary political, social, and cultural phenomena. Offered fall. 4 credits. (UQ)

TCCA-333  GENDERED COMMUNICATION

Current scholarship and controversies in communication and gender research. The interdependence of gender, communication, and culture. Focus on lived experience within U.S. culture through interactive course format. Offered spring of odd-numbered years. 3 credits. (IS or US)

TCCA-335  NONVERBAL COMMUNICATION

The processes and effects of nonverbal communication. Research about communication by means of body movement, spatial relationships, vocal cues, touch, and physical appearance. Focus on impact of nonverbal cues in specific communication contexts such as interviews, doctor-patient interactions, and the courtroom. Offered fall of oddnumbered years. 3 credits. (IS)

TCCA-340  PERSUASION AND SOCIAL INFLUENCE

Rhetorical, psychological, and social principles used to influence behaviors of individuals and groups. Focus on logic and reasoning, structure of arguments, symbols, credibility, motivation, attitude change and ethics. Study of persuasion in public relations and political campaigns, interpersonal contexts and social movements. Includes oral and written projects. Offered fall. 4 credits. (IS)

TCCA-353  TOPICS IN WOMEN'S RHETORIC

Women's public discourse, including survey of significant female speakers in political, social, and religious contexts. The role of women's public discourse in the process of social change through topics such as Rhetoric of the Women's Movement - 1770-1920, Women's Public Voices - 1960 to present, and Women's Political Campaign Discourse. May be repeated once for credit with different content. Offered spring of even-numbered years. 3 credits. (US or GP or IS or VP depending on topic)

TCCA-355  TOPICS IN AMERICAN PUBLIC ADDRESS

Study of U.S. public address, including significant speakers in political, social, and religious contexts. The role of public discourse in promoting and accommodating social change through topics such as the discourse of war and peace; presidential discourse, discussion of human rights in the United States, protest rhetoric in the 1960s. May be repeated once for credit with different content. Offered spring of odd-numbered years. 3 credits. (IS or US or VP depending on topic)

TCCA-420  TOPICS IN PERFORMANCE STUDIES

Methodological approaches to performance studies and the objects or sites of performance those methods presume, construct, and privilege. Techniques for scripting, directing, and presenting public performances in topics such as Performing Ethnography, Performance and Popular Culture, Group Performance, and Performing Gender. May be repeated once for credit with different content.
Prerequisite: junior standing or higher. Offered fall of odd-numbered years. 3 credits. (CS or GP or US)

TCCA-430  TOPICS IN HUMAN COMMUNICATION

Human communication theories and how they explain and influence human interaction. Topics such as Organizational Communication, Intercultural Conflict Resolution, Theories of Intercultural Communication, Small Group Communication, Theoretical Perspectives in Relational Communication. May be repeated once for credit with different content.
Prerequisite: junior standing or higher. Offered fall of even-numbered years. 3 credits. (IS or GP or US depending on topic)

TCCA-455  RHETORICAL THEORY AND CRITICISM

Examination of major writers, works, and paradigms in the discipline of rhetoric from the Greeks to postmodernists. Rhetorical perspectives that focus on societal values and ethics, the nature of knowledge, and the nature of being and reality. Theory, methods, and varied practices of rhetorical criticism.
Prerequisite: junior standing or higher or consent of instructor. Offered spring of even-numbered years. 4 credits. (UQ, MWI)

TCCA-476  SENIOR SEMINAR

Capstone course integrating theoretical and practical issues of the curriculum. Includes self-assessment; research into graduate school opportunities, internships and other career options; development of research project of publishable or "performative" quality with public presentation.
Prerequisites: 255 and senior standing. Offered fall. 3 credits. (MWI)

Portland Campus Courses

Art and Visual Culture

AAVC-150  DESIGN: TWO DIMENSIONAL

3 credit version of 100. (CS)

AAVC-160  DRAWING

Three credit version of AAVC 120. (CS)

AAVC-180  SURVEY OF WESTERN ART

3 credit version of 202. (CS)

AAVC-182  MODERN ART: 1880-1945

3 credit version of 310. (CS or VP or GP, MWI)

AAVC-201  ART SURVEY: PREHISTORIC-MIDDLE AGES

Introductory survey covering painting, sculpture,and architecture. Intended to develop anappreciation/knowledge of the internationalsocio-cultural, political, and economic forcesthat shaped its development from the Paleolithicera through the Middle Ages.
$25 lab fee.4 credits (CS)

Biology

BIOL-245  PLANT SYSTEMATICS

Basic concepts of modern plant systematics.Includes synthesis of modern evolutionary theorywith plant classification systems. Will coverhistorical and modern methods of developingclassification systems, characteristics of commonplant families, and common plants in the PacificNorthwest and their ecological significance.Students will also learn to use keys.
Prerequisites: 211 or consent of instructor.3 credits.

BIOL-255  PRINCIPALS OF MICROBIOLOGY

The biology of microorganisms including virusesand bacteria. Principles of microbial disease,pathogenicity and immunology. Lab coversmicrobiological techniques, isolation andidentification of microorganisms and environmentalmicrobiology.
Prerequisites: CHEM 210, 211 or BIOL 210, 211.Offered fall and spring semesters.4 credits

BIOL-265  PRINCIPLES OF GENETICS

Basic concepts of modern genetics including thestructure and function of genes; the inheritanceof genes; genetic recombination; geneticcomponents of normal cell growth and development;genetic components of cancer; and population andevolutionary genetics.
Prerequisite: 211 or 255.4 credits

BIOL-266  PRINCIPLES OF GENETICS LABORATORY

Student investigations and experimentationregarding the inheritance of genetic traits inliving organisms, and introduction to techniquesof modern genetic analysis.Corequisite: 265.1 credit.

BIOL-306  ANATOMY

Basic structures and functions of the cells,tissues, and organs composing the systems of thehuman body, and analyzing the relationships be-tween organs, systems, and groups of systems.Lecture and laboratory.
$55 lab fee.
Prerequisites: CHEM 210, 211; or BIOL 210, 211.Offered fall semester.5 credits.

BIOL-307  PHYSIOLOGY

Functions of organs and systems of mammals.Emphasis on regulatory mechanisms necessary fornormal homeostasis. Lecture and laboratory.
Prerequisites: 306; CHEM 210, 211; MATH 140.Offered spring semester.5 credits

BIOL-313  CLASSIFICATION OF PLANTS AND PLANT COMMUNITIES

Principles and methods of classification andidentification of plants and plant communities.Focus on identification of major flowering plantfamilies and ecoregions in Oregon or othergeographic area. Field observation and laboratoryexamination of plants.3 credits

BIOL-315  PHARMACOLOGY

Theories of drug actions, physiological processesmediating drug actions, variables affecting drugactions, and unusual responses to drug therapy.Major drug classes and examples of drugs incurrent use.
Prerequisites: Math proficiency or consent ofinstructor.3 credits

BIOL-324  PATHOPHYSIOLOGY I

Processes involved in disease at the cellular and organ system levels. Emphasis on underlyingchemical, biophysical, and physiologicalmechanisms that form the basis of disease.Discussion of specific diseases to illustrateconcepts. Topics covered include: generalpathology, respiratory, cardiovascular and renalpathology.Prequisites: 306, 307; and CHEM 224, 225. BIOL 255recommended.3 credits (NW)

BIOL-326  PATHOPHYSIOLOGY II

A continuaton of Pathophysiology 1. Topics coveredinclude genetics, endocrine, neuro and GIpathophysiology along with disturbance in fluid,electrolyte, and acid-base balance.
Prerequisites: 325 or consent of instructor.3 credits (NW)

BIOL-345  ESSENTIALS OF IMMUNOLOGY

Principles of immunology including structure andfunction of antibody molecules; the nature ofantigens; development and function of B and Tlymphocytes; humoral and cell mediated reactionswith antigen in vivo and in vitro; and immunologicdisorders. Lecture.
Prerequisites: 306; CHEM 224, 225; or consent ofthe instructor.3 credits (NW)

BIOL-355  GENERAL ECOLOGY

The study of principles of ecology. Organismal,ecosystem, population, community, landscape, andglobal ecology will be covered. Focus on how theplant functions in both an evolutionary andecological framework. Not for Biology majorcredit, but acceptable for Biology minor orGeneral Science major. Lecture and laboratory.
Prerequisites: MATH 140 and BIOL 210, 211 orconsent of the instructor.3 credits

BIOL-375  FIELD ZOOLOGY

Field techniques and principles used to studypopulations of birds and mammals, emphasizingthose of the Pacific Northwest. Includesidentification and classification, populationecology, adaptions to the environment, fieldtechniques, and preparation of museum specimans.Not for Biology major credit, but acceptable forBiology minor or General Science major.Lecture and laboratory.
Prerequisites: either 210/211, or 306; MATH 105 orequivalent.3 credits (NW)

BIOL-405  Selected Topics in Pathophysiology

Current topics and advances in pathophysiology,such as shock, drugs used in heart disease,ventilation-perfusion mismatching in the lungs,and determination of anion gap. Seminardiscussions and student presentations.3 credits (NW or QR)

BIOL-415  ADVANCED TOPICS IN ANATOMY

A regional approach to anatomy designed to allow astudent to pursue an in-depth study of one area ofthe human body. Lecture, discussion andlaboratory. May be repeated for credit on anothertopic.
Prerequisites: BIOL 306.2 credits

Chemistry

CHEM-224  GENERAL CHEMISTRY GENERAL CHEMISTRY

A general chemistry course designed for HealthScience majors. Studies in stoichiometry,structure, thermodynamics, kinetics, solutions,and electrochemistry. Special emphasis on the gaslaws, chemical equilibrium, organic chemistry andbiochemistry. Four lecture hours and one 3-hourlaboratory period.5 credits each

CHEM-225  GENERAL CHEMISTRY

A general chemistry course designed for HealthScience majors. Studies in stoichiometry,structure, thermodynamics, kinetics, solutions,and electrochemistry. Special emphasis on the gaslaws, chemical equilibrium, organic chemistry andbiochemistry. Four lecture hours and one 3-hourlaboratory period.5 credits each

CHEM-241  ORGANIC CHEMISTRY

An organic chemistry course designed for HealthSciences majors. Studies of structures,properties, and bonding of organic molecules, aswell as mechanisms of organic reactions.Synthesis of organic compounds and analysis oforganic substances and mixtures. Four lecturehours and one 3-hour laboratory period.
Prerequisite: CHEM 224, 225.5 credits

CHEM-242  ORGANIC CHEMISTRY

An organic chemistry course designed for HealthSciences majors. Studies of structures,properties, and bonding of organic molecules, aswell as mechanisms of organic reactions.Synthesis of organic compounds and analysis oforganic substances and mixtures. Four lecturehours and one 3-hour laboratory period.5 credits

CHEM-360  PRINCIPLES OF BIOCHEMISTRY

Study of the chemistry compounds of biologicalorigin and their interactions in living systems.Emphasis on metabolic pathways and regulation ofthese pathways. For Health Sciences majors.Three hours of lecture and one 3-hour laboratoryperiod.
Prerequisite: CHEM 242 or equivalent.4 credits

Computer Science

COMP-120  MICROCOMPUTER APPLICATIONS

Introduction to useful problem solving, using current software on PCcompatibles and Apple Macintoshes. Major operating systems, word processing, file creation, database management, data communications, electronic spreadsheets, form letters, idea processing, business graphics, sorting, searching, printing, and integrated software systems. Not for credit toward the Computer Science major or minor.
$50 lab fee. 3 credits.

Health Sciences

HSCI-025  SKILLS FOR POST-GRADUATE EXAMINATION

Course designed to help students excel onpost-graduate exanminations. Improve study skillsand strategies, time management, and exposure todifferent examination styles.Offered fall. 1 credit.

HSCI-040  COMMUNITY SERVICE ACTIVITIES

Community service activity focused on assistingagencies that provide health services necessaryfor the well-being of the community.1 credit. (EL)

HSCI-090  CAREER AND LIFE PLANNING

Goal setting and decision making applicable toindividual life and career needs in areas ofhealth care; preparation for health sciencesinternships.Offered fall. 1 credit.

HSCI-096  COMPUTER BASED PRESENTATIONS

Techniques for developing slides for computer presentations using Keynote or PowerPoint.Techniques for making master slides and themes,building graphics and transitions, font and colorselection for a variety of settings. Evaluationof presentation graphics for clarity and precisionin presenting concepts to groups. Offered springsemester. 1 credit.

HSCI-098  MEDICAL AND HEALTH TERMINOLOGY

Instructor mentored, hybrid in-class/on-linecourse in medical and health care terminology.Lecture, workbook assignments, CD-ROM andBlackboard. Emphasis on origin, use,pronounciation, and spelling. Covers structuresand human body systems.Offered fall.2 credits.

HSCI-240  CLINICAL SKILLS

Provides students with didactic knowledge andbasic skills needed to function in clinicalsettings. Includes lecture, discussion andlaboratory.
Prerequisites: HSCI 098 and SOA 223.Offered every other spring.3 credits.

HSCI-260  SCIENCE AS A CANDLE IN THE DARK

Examination of how science has changed our worldview through a critical exploration of our mostfundamental beliefs and cultural practices.Connections between natural sciences, socialsciences and humanities are examined to understandhow natural science has changed the way humansperceive themselves and their role in the worldand universe.

HSCI-261  HERSTORY: THE HISTORY OF WOMEN IN Science

Seminar dealing with the changing roles of womenin science and history. The role of women in worldhistory. The history of science from Galileo'stime through the present and how women in sciencehave moved from interested bystanders to activeresearchers. Problems modern women scientists facetoday.4 credits. (WI)

HSCI-300  SELECTED TOPICS IN HEALTH SCIENCES

Focus on new developments, advanced topics, orsubjects of current interest in health sciences.May be repeated once for credit with differentcontent.
Prerequisite: Determined by instructor for eachspecific course.3 credits.

HSCI-301  HUMAN BIOLOGY I

Lecture and laboratory for students in the HealthSciences Administration major focusing on basicprinciples of the science of the human body inhealth. Topics include: Fundamentals of ChemistryBiology of the Cell and Human Anatomy andPhysiology.Offered fall, 4 credits (NW)

HSCI-302  HUMAN BIOLOGY II

Lecture and laboratory course for students in the Health Sciences Administration major focusing onbiology of human disease processes, their treat-ment and their relationship to the environment. Topics include: Microbiology, Genetics andEvolution, Pathophysiology, Pharmacology, andEnvironmental Health.
Prerequisites: 302, Offered spring: 4 credits (NW)

HSCI-310  RESEARCH METHODS

Methods used in conducting research on problemsarising in health care. Exploration of a researchtopic that includes collecting and analyzing data,writing a research report, and presenting resultsof research.
Prerequisite: MATH 140. 4 credits (MWI)

HSCI-311  RESEARCH METHODS II

Exploration of a research topic that includescollecting and analyzing data, writing a researchreport, and presenting results of research via apublic forum.
Prerequisite: 310 or consent of instructor.3 credits.

HSCI-315  HEALTH CARE TEAM DYNAMICS

Introduction to team dynamics in health care.Students will learn theories and principles ofleading and working in effective teams with ahealth care environment. Tools, principles andplanning processes are covered. Conflictresolution tools.
Prerequisite: General psychology highlyrecommended.3 credits.

HSCI-320  HEALTH & SOCIAL POLICY

Examination of U.S. health and social policy.Analysis of the public policy process, majorpublic social and health programs, specialinterests, and political differences. The role offederal, state, as well as local governments andthe legal system in policy implementation.Understanding complex health and social problemsas they are translated into standards of conduct.3 credits. (WI)

HSCI-330  GLOBAL HEALTH

A multi-disciplinary introduction to key publichealth issues in the developed world, the emergingworld, and developing world. Intended for studentsfrom any major who want a foundation in globalhealth issues from a science, social, political,economic and business perspective.3 credits (IS or GP)

HSCI-370  GEOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION SYSTEMS FOR THE HEALTH SCIENCES

Geographical Information Systems concepts andtechniques for creating maps and analyzing spatialand attribute data. Emphasis on using GIS toexamine issues and problems in epidemiology,public and environmental health, and health careadministration. Lecture and lab.
Prerequisite: MATH 140 or consent of instructor.3 credits (IS or QR)

HSCI-395  GREAT BOOKS IN THE DISCIPLINE

Readings from recent books explaining newscientific discoveries in biology, informationscience, physics, chemistry, and cosmology.Discussion focuses on the impact of thesediscoveries on society, our unexamined assumptionsabout our beliefs, cultural practices, and oursocial responsibilities.3 credits. (UQ)

HSCI-420  HEALTH ADMINISTRATION

Introduction to the concepts of health careadministration. Focus on the U.S. health caresystem, general concepts of health caremanagement, and aspects of leadership as theyapply to the health care system. Theories ofmotivation, budgeting concepts, strategicplanning, quality improvement principles, controlin health care service organization, health carereform, government regulations, and private, stateand local health care insurance structures.Offered fall.3 credits.

HSCI-440  EPIDEMIOLOGY (CROSS-LISTED WITH ENVS 440)

Introduction to epidemiology of disease. Acuteand chronic diseases are discussed from apopulation point of view. Topics include modes oftransmission, outbreak of investigation,surveillance of acute infections and chronicdiseases, and microbial and environmental causes.
Prerequisites: BIOL 210, 211, and 255 or 361.Offered spring.3 credits.

HSCI-450  ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH

Study of the effects of water and air pollution,food additives, pesticides, heavy metals, organicsolvents, mycotoxins, and radiation. Examinesconcepts of toxicology, epidemiology, riskassessment, safety control, and environmental law.
Prerequisites: junior or senior standing, and BIOL210 and 211, or consent of instructor.Offered fall.3 credits (IS or GP)

HSCI-480  INDEPENDENT STUDY

Program of directed tutorial reading on some topicor problem within the discipline relating to thespecial interests of the student and supervised bya departmental faculty member.1-5 credits.

HSCI-485  SENIOR SEMINAR IN HEALTH SCIENCES

Capstone course exploring issues related to healthcare in the United States and throughout theworld. Topics include health care delivery, healthcare reform, and interdisciplinary exploration ofglobal public health issues.
Prerequisite: senior standing.3 credits.

HSCI-487  INTERNSHIP

Intensive learning experience on-site inhealth-related organization.
Prerequisites: HSCI 090; senior standing. 2-5credits. May be repeated once. A total of 3credits required for a major. (EL)

HSCI-490  RESEARCH/THESIS

Intensive research and writing on a topic ofspecial interest to the student under thedirection of a member of the faculty. Thesis andpublic oral presentation required. Required forhonors thesis students. May be repeated, up to amaximum of 5 total credits.
Prerequisites: approval of supervising facultymember and department chair.1-5 credits.

Health, Human Performance and Athletics

HHPA-038  SAILING

Paracurricular courses are repeatable for credit.2 credits (EL)

HHPA-039  BEGINNING TAI CHI

Paracurricular courses are repeatable for credit.1 credit (EL)

HHPA-041  ADVANCED TAI CHI

Paracurricular courses are repeatable for credit.1 credit (EL)

HHPA-049  HIKING


$60 fee (
$65 beginning 2010 fall). Paracurricularcourses are repeatable for credit.1-2 credits (EL)

HHPA-064  BASIC MASSAGE

Paracurricular courses are repeatable for credit.1 credit (EL)

HHPA-085  QIGONG AND TAIJIQUAN

Paracurricular courses are repeatable for credit.1 credit (EL)

Modern Language - Spanish

MLSP-111  ELEMENTARY SPANISH I

Development of vocabulary, structures, andspeaking/reading/writing strategies essential tobasic languge use. Situation-based practice inasking and answering questions; identifying,comparing, and describing people and things;expressing feelings, wants and needs anddiscussing plans. Preparation for working inhealth care environment.NOTE: Does not satisfy BA requirement.3 credits

MLSP-112  ELEMENTARY SPANISH II

Development of vocabulary, structures, andspeaking/reading/writing strategies essential tobasic languge use. Situation-based practice inasking and answering questions; identifying,comparing, and describing people and things;expressing feelings, wants and needs anddiscussing plans. Preparation for working inhealth care environment.NOTE: Does not satisfy BA requirement.3 credits

Nursing

NURS-009  ASSISTANTS IN RESEARCH ACTIVITIES

An opportunity to assist researchers in carryingout health related research.1 credit. (EL)

NURS-010  CREATIVE STRESS MANAGEMENT

Education in simple, specialized techniques formind calming and body relaxation; assessment ofindividual and environmental stressors;problem-solving strategies that foster analytical,critical, and creative thinking as well asintuitive processes; stress manaagement skills inthe clinical setting.1 credit. (EL)

NURS-015  HEALTH CARE TERMINOLOGY

Introduction to the principles of health careterminology.1 credit. (EL)

NURS-020  DOSAGE CALCULATIONS

Focus on critical thinking in relation to dosagecalculation. Practice with conversions betweenmetric, apothecary, and household measurements.Oral, parenteral, and intravenous dosages for boththe adult and the pediatric client.1 credit. (EL)

NURS-025  TESTING SKILLS FOR THE NCLEX-RN EXAM

Preparation for Senior Review Course. Assessmentof baseline English, math, and/or test takingabilities. Individualized remediation.
Prerequisite: senior standing. 1 credit. (EL)

NURS-030  SPANISH HEALTHCARE TERMINOLOGY

Spanish vocabulary and discursive structuresutilized in health professions for basiccommunication and client assessment. Previousknowledge of basic Spanish languagevocabulary and structures recommended.
Prerequisite: consent of instructor.1 credit

NURS-040  COMMUNITY SERVICE ACTIVITIES

Community service activity focused on assistingagencies that provide health services necessaryfor the well-being of the community.1 credit. (EL)

NURS-050  EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING CENTER STUDENT MENTOR

Provides student opportunity to learn and developmentoring skills (how to coach, reinforcelearning, and support nursing students who arelearning clinical skills). May be taken threetimes for credit. 1 credit.

NURS-060  GRADUATE CAREER OPPORTUNIES IN NURSING

Exploration of career opportunities in nursing practice, education, administration, and research available with graduate degreeds in nursing.1 credit

NURS-090  COMPUTER SKILLS IN NURSING

Introductory skills in the use of computers, withapplications useful to the practice of nursing.1 credit. (EL)

NURS-103  SOCIALIZATION INTO NURSING: FOUNDATIONS FOR REFLECTIVE NURSING PRACTICE

Preparation for reflective nursing practice byincreasing student self-awareness and examiningnursing contexts, professional values, ways ofbeing, and basic concepts.
Prerequisite: admission to the Nursing major.3 credits (WI)

NURS-106L  SOCIALIZATION INTO NURSING: HELPING Role of the Nurse Lab/Clinical

NURS-130  SUBSTANCE ABUSE ISSUES FOR HEALTH PROFESSIONALS

Exploration of substance abuse issues with individuals and their families. Emphasis on the role of the health care professional as part of an interdisciplinary team. 3 credits.

NURS-195  HLTH CARE PRSPECTVS:DEATH/DYING

Findings, theories, and nursing skills related todeath, dying, and bereavement, with attention tovalues and ethical questions, as well astechnological, social, economic, and politicalissues.3 credits. (UQ)

NURS-223  NURSING CARE OF CLIENTS IN THE HISPANIC COMMUNITY

Professional nursing care of Hispanic population. Focus on topics such as religion, access, communication, economics, and politics in relation to health. Application in a local Hispanic community setting. Enrollment limited by practicum space.
Prerequisites: 213, 206. Spanish language skills useful, but not required. 4 credits.

NURS-240  NURSING PERSPECTIVES ON SURVIVORS OF VIOLENCE

The survivor's experience of violence, with emphasis on developing self-awareness as an essential component of providing nursing care to survivors of violence. 2 credits.

NURS-241  BRAIN, MIND, AND SOCIETY

Focuses on the interplay of neurological processes that influence individual thought, emotion, and behavior in concert with social and environmental demands. This course is not offered to students who have completed PSYC 182 or 325 or 382. Offered spring of odd-numbered years. 3 credits.

NURS-245  EVOLUTION OF NURSING

Exploration of selected aspects of nursing history, including the contributions of religious orders and culturally and ethnically diverse nurses, and their effects on contemporary nursing. 3 credits. (VP)

NURS-250  CRITICAL THINKING IN HEALTH CARE: BECOMING A REFLECTIVE SKEPTIC

Meaning and application of critical thinking in personal and professional life. Emphasis on becoming critical thinkers, recognizing errors in thinking, and evaluating ideas, using critical incidents. 3 credits.

NURS-291  HOLISTIC NRSG:PRACTICING HLTHY LVNG

Theories and concepts necessary for understanding holistic principles. Recognition that holism is a way of being. Application of holistic principles in students' personal and professional roles. 3 credits.

NURS-302  Traditional & Non-Traditional Healing Practices in Mexico

Investigation of Mexican beliefs about health and illness in the state of Morelos. Language immersion, field trips to health care settings, and interaction with families as well as traditional and non-traditional health care providers.
Prerequisites: 103 and 106 and 1 year of Spanish language instruction or consent of the instructor. 4 credits.

NURS-305  FOUNDATIONS OF COMMUNITY-BASED NURSING PRACTICE

Foundational concepts of community-based nursing in preparation for reflective professional practice. Lecture/Discussion. Fees may apply. Generic Program: Semester 1.
Prerequisite: Admission to the School of Nursing. Corequisites: 315, 320, 335. 4 credits.

NURS-306  FOUNDATIONS OF COMMUNITY-BASED NURSING PRACTICE

Foundational concepts of community-based nursingin preparation for professional nursing practice.Includes professional communication skills foreffective working relationships with members ofthe healthcare team and diverse clients ininterdisciplinary settings. Lecture/discussion.Lab fees may apply.Accelerated Program: Semester 1.
Prerequisite: admission to the School of Nursing.Corequisites: 320, 336.4 credits

NURS-311  CLINICAL NURSING SKILLS

Laboratory course focused on teaching and learningassessment as well as on technical skills requiredfor nursing care in a variety of settings.Essential content to be covered prior to beginningclinicals in 313, 316 and 318.
Prerequisites: Cumulative BSN GPA of at least 2.50and completion of 206, 208 and 213.Co-requisite: concurrent enrollment in 313, 316,or 318.2 credits lab

NURS-311L  CLINICAL NURSING SKILLS

NURS-312  FEMINIST ETHICS IN HEALTH CARE (CROSS- LISTED WITH PHIL 312)

See PHIL 312. 3 credits.

NURS-313  ILLNESS EXP: ADAPTING TO HLTH CHLLNGS

Discussion of nursing concepts related to chronic health challenges across the life span and in a variety of clinical settings. Includes nursing care, nutrition, pathophysiology, pharmacology, the meaning of illness and healing related to such concepts as chronicity, rehabilitation, comfort, wound healing, mobility, and elimination.
Prerequisites: Cumulative B.S.N. GPA of at least 2.50 and completion of 311. 6 credits (3 theory; 3 lab). (WI)

NURS-313L  ILLNESS EXPERIENCES: ADAPTING TO HEALTH Challenges Clinical

NURS-316  ILLNESS EXPERIENCES: LIFE THREATENING HEALTH CHALLENGES

Discussion of nursing concepts related to lifethreatening crises and chronic health challengesacross the life span and in a variety of clinicalsettings. Includes nursing care, nutrition,pathophysiology, pharmacology, and meaning ofillness and healing related to selected conceptssuch as acuity, homeostasis, oxygenation,immunity, alteration in consciousness.
Prerequisites: Cumulative BSN GPA of at least 2.50and completion of 311.6 credits (3 theory; 3 lab)

NURS-316L  ILLNESS EXPERIENCES: LIFE THREATENING Health Challenges Clinical

NURS-317  PERINATAL NURSING

Professional nursing care of low-and high-risk perinatal families during the prenatal, intrapartal, postpartal, and neonatal period.
Prerequisite: 316. 4 credits (2 theory; 2 lab).

NURS-318  MATERNAL-CHILD HLTH CHLLLNGS

Theory and practice of maternal-child nursing in a hospital setting. Includes the study of concepts of development, safety, communication, pain, fever, oxygenation, homeostasis, loss, and ethics as they relate to maternal-child health.
Prerequisites: Cumulative B.S.N. GPA of at least 2.50 and completion of 311. 4 credits. (2 theory; 2 lab).

NURS-318L  MATERNAL-CHILD HEALTH CHALLENGES CLINICAL

NURS-319  ADVANCED NURSING OF CHILDREN

Theory and practice in the provision of family centered care of children experiencing complex chronic health problems.
Prerequisite: 316. 4 credits (2 theory; 2 lab).

NURS-335  INTEGRATED EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING I

Skills for safe clinical nursing practice by using experiential learning in clinical and simulated laboratory settings that promotes integration of semester one concepts. Lecture/Discussion, lab.
$470 fee. Generic Program: Semester 1.
Prerequisite: Admission to the School of Nursing. Corequisites: 305, 315, 320. 6 credits (1 theory, 5 lab).

NURS-336  INTEGRATED EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING I: FOUNDATIONS

Skills for safe clinical nursing practice by usingexperiential learning in clinicial and simulatedlaboratory settings that promotes integration ofsemester concepts. Lecture/discussion/lab. Labfees may apply.Accelerated Program: Semester 1.
Prerequisite: admission to the School of Nursing.Corequisites: 306, 320.6 credits

NURS-340  MULTICULTURAL AND INTERNATIONAL NURSING COURSE

Methods of assessment and interventions designed to foster the delivery of multicultural congruent nursing and international health care are explored. Values, beliefs, and practices related to health, illness, and health care of selected ethnic and cultural groups are discussed.
Prerequisites: 103 and 106 and proficiency in Microcomputer Applications. 3 credits.

NURS-345  SPIRITUAL PERSPECTIVES OF NURSING

Study of various religious orientations in relation to health, illness, and nursing care. Nursing as a means of addressing clients spiritual needs in relation to pain, suffering, and death.
Prerequisites: 103 and 106. 2 credits.

NURS-346  SEXUALITY: A NURSING PERSPECTIVE

Analysis of sexuality as a basic human attribute expressed in health and illness with implications for nursing practice.
Prerequisites: 103 and 106. 3 credits.

NURS-347  PALLIATIVE CARE OF CHILDREN

Issues regarding holistic palliative care of children and their families. Role of the nurse in the interdisciplinary palliative care team.
Prerequisite: 313 or 316. 3 credits.

NURS-348  GERONTOLOGICAL NURSING

In-depth gerontological nursing theory. Students explore knowledge from nursing and other scientific and humanistic disciplines in providing nursing care for the older adult client in the context of family, group, and community. Lab optional.
Prerequisites: 103 and 106. 2 credits.

NURS-349  GERONTOLOGICAL NURSING LAB

Clinical experience in gerontological nursing. Enrollment limited by clinical space. Corequisite: 348. 1 credit.

NURS-350  ADVANCED HEALTH ASSESSMENT

Advanced health assessment of persons across the lifespan. Builds on basic nursing assessment skills. Lab experience with health assessment. Enrollment limited by lab space. Pre-or co-requisite: 311. 2 credits (1 lecture; 1 lab).

NURS-351  NURSING CARE OF THE PERI-OPERATIVE PATIENT

Developing clinical judgment to provide holistic nursing care across the lifespan. Focus on the pre, intra, and post-operative nursing care of the surgical patient including patient assessment and teaching; instrumentation; intraoperative complications and safety hazards; post-surgical care and patient education. Enrollment limited by clinical space. 2 credits.

NURS-352  NURSING CARE OF THE PERI-OPERATIVE PATIENT (LAB)

Utilizing clinical judgment to provide holistic nursing care across the lifespan. Focus on the pre, intra, and postoperative nursing care of the surgical patient including patient assessment and teaching; instrumentation; intraoperative complications and safety hazards; post-surgical care and patient education.
Prerequisite or corequisite: 351. 1 credit.

NURS-355  NURSING CARE OF CHILDREN, ADULTS, AND OLDER ADULTS WITH CHRONIC CONDITIONS

Essential knowledge of concepts, theories, and clinical practice necessary to make sound clinical judgments when providing nursing care to persons with chronic conditions, their families, and caregivers. Lecture/Discussion. Fees may apply. Generic Program: Semester 2.
Prerequisites: 305, 315, 320, 335. Corequisites: 365, 375, 395. 3 credits.

NURS-356  LIFESPAN CHRONIC ILLNESS CARE

Lifespan approach to essential concepts andknowledge for health promotion and nursing caremanagement of persons experiencing chronicphysical and mental health conditions. Explorationof impact of chronic illness on families andcaregivers. Lecture/discussion. Lab fees mayapply.Accelerated Program: Semester 2.
Prerequisites: 306, 320, 336.Corequisites: 366, 376.4 credits

NURS-360  FAMILY VIOLENCE & NURSE'S ROLE

Family violence as a multifaceted problem within the broader social context, with focus on theories, research, and nursing practice. The nurse's role in working with those involved in partner, child, and elder abuse.
Prerequisite or corequisite: 206. 2 credits.

NURS-361  FAMILY VIOLENCY & THE NURSE'S ROLE (LAB)

Clinical experience with those for whom family violence is a health problem. Enrollment limited by clinical space.
Prerequisite or corequisite: 360. 1 credit.

NURS-363  CLINICAL ETHICS (X-LISTED AS PHIL 363)

Critical thinking about current ethical problemswithin the context of clinical practice.Addresses issues across the lifespan and within avariety of cultures.
Prerequisites: PHIL 450.Pre/corequisites: PHIL 451 & junior standing.3 credits

NURS-365  CLINICAL PATHOPHYSIOLOGY AND PHARMACOLOGY FOR NURSING PRACTICE I

Application of concepts of pathophysiology and pharmacology within the context of nursing care of clients with prevalent chronic and mental health conditions. Lecture/Discussion. Fees may apply. Generic Program: Semester 2.
Prerequisites: 305, 315, 320, 335. Corequisites: 355, 375, 395. 2 credits.

NURS-366  PATHOPHYSIOLOGY AND PHARMACOLOGY FOR NURSING PRACTICE

Concepts of pathophysiology and pharmacologyrelated to nursing care of persons experiencingchronic, mental health and acute conditions andhealth transitions. Lecture/discussion. Lab feesmay apply.Accelerated Program: Semester 2.
Prerequisites: 306, 320, 336.Corequisites: 356, 376.3 credits

NURS-370  CARDIOPULMONARY REHABILITATION NURSING

Concepts related to cardiopulmonary rehabilitation in inpatient, outpatient, and community settings. Integrated theory, research and practice.
Prerequisite: 106. 2 credits.

NURS-371  CARDIOPULMONARY REHAB LAB

Clinical experiences within the context of a hospital or community-based cardiopulmonary rehabilitation program. Enrollment limited by clinical space. Corequisite: 370. 1 credit.

NURS-375  INTEGRATED EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING II

Preparation to use sound clinical judgment in providing nursing care with clients experiencing chronic health conditions and mental health conditions in a variety of settings. Promotes integration of semester two concepts.
$50 fee. Generic Program: Semester 2.
Prerequisites: 305, 315, 320, 335. Corequisites: 355, 365, 395. 6 credits (lab).

NURS-376  INTEGRATED EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING II: CHRONIC CARE

Preparation to use sound clinical judgment in thenursing care management of clients experiencingchronic and mental health conditions in a varietyof settings. Lecture/discussion/lab. Lab fees mayapply.Accelerated Program: Semester 2.
Prerequisites: 306, 320, 336.Corequisites: 356, 366.6 credits

NURS-385  PEOPLE-ANIMAL PARTNERSHIPS IN HEALTH CARE

Examination of the developing field of animal assisted therapy (AAT) as currently practiced. Exploration and evaluation of different programs. Site visitations and field trips to facilities in Oregon and Washington that use AAT prosthetically, or in rehabilitation, or that involve training for AAT.
Prerequisites: 106; PSYC 186 or 300, or consent of instructor. 5 credits.

NURS-395  MENTAL HEALTH AND ILLNESS ACROSS THE LIFESPAN

Examine promotion of mental health, disease prevention, treatment and nursing care management of mental illness in diverse populations across the lifespan. Lecture/Discussion. Fees may apply. Generic Program: Semester 2.
Prerequisites: 305, 315, 320, 335. Corequisites: 355, 365, 375. 2 credits.

NURS-416  NURSING IN A GLOBAL SOCIETY: STEWARDSHIP OF THE COMMUNITY

Theory and application of principles of professionalism, ethics, leadership and management, health care policy, and health care finance in the care and service aggregate population(s). Includes the study and practice of activism within the profession.
Prerequisites: cumulative B.S.N. GPA of at least 2.5 and completion of 311, 313, 314, 316 and 318. 5 credits (3 theory; 2 lab). (WI)

NURS-416L  NURSING IN A GLOBAL SOCIETY: STEWARDSHIP OF THE COMMUNITY CLINICAL

NURS-419  RFLCTV PRCTCE/GLBL SCTY:SR PRRCTCM

Reflective practice in an area of nursing selected by the student with an emphasis on synthesis of concepts integrated throughout the nursing curriculum. Focus on clinical decision making with a global perspective. Includes weekly praxis seminars.
$75 fee.
Prerequisites: cumulative B.S.N. GPA of at least 2.50 and completion of 311, 313, 314, 316 and 318. 5 credits. (1 theory/ PRAXIS; 4 lab.)

NURS-419L  REFLECTIVE PRACTICE IN A GLOBAL SOCIETY: SENIOR PRACTICUM CLINICAL

NURS-425  TRANSITIONS AND DECISIONS: PREGNANCY, BIRTH AND END OF LIFE CARE

Essential concepts, knowledge and skills to care for clients and their families during major life transitions of pregnancy, birth and end of life. Lecture/Discussion. Fees may apply. Generic Program: Semester 3.
Prerequisites: 355, 365, 375, 395. Corequisites: 435, 445, 455. 2 credits.

NURS-435  INTEGRATED EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING III

Planning and delivery of nursing care that is evidence based, prioritizes needs and goals, demonstrates skill proficiency, and considers ethical and cultural implications. Promotes integration of semester three concepts.
$85 fee. Generic Program: Semester 3.
Prerequisites: 355, 365, 375, 395. Corequisites: 425, 445, 455. 6 credits (lab).

NURS-436  INTEGRATED EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING III: ACUTE CARE

Preparation for use of sound clinical judgment inthe nursing care, management of persons who areexperiencing acute physical and mental illness,episodic events and major life transitions.Lecture/discussion/lab. Lab fees may apply.Accelerated Program: Semester 3.
Prerequisites: 356, 366, 376.Corequisite: 45.6 credits

NURS-440  ONCOLOGY NURSING

Application of the nursing process to adult clients with cancer and with their families.
Prerequisites: 313 and 316. 2 credits.

NURS-441  ONCOLOGY NURSING (LAB)

Clinical experience in oncology nursing. Enrollment limited by clinical space. Corequisite: 440. 1 credit.

NURS-442  TOPICS IN FAMILY NURSING

Selected maternal-child conditions and nursing care.
Prerequisites: 313, 316. 2 credits.

NURS-443  ADVANCED CLINICAL IN MATERNAL-CHILD NURSING (LAB)

Clinical experience focusing on the complex nursing care of clients and their families with selected maternal-child conditions. Enrollment limited by clinical space. Corequisite: 442. 1 credit.

NURS-445  CLINICAL PATHOPHYSIOLOGY AND PHARMACOLOGY FOR NURSING PRACTICE II

Application of concepts of pathophysiology and pharmacology as a foundation for nursing care of clients with prevalent acute health conditions and episodic events. Lecture/Discussion. Fees may apply. Generic Program: Semester 3.
Prerequisites: 355, 365, 375, 395. Corequisites: 425, 435, 455. 2 credits.

NURS-450  NURSING CARE IN SUDDEN ILLNESS & TRAUMA

Application of the nursing process to individuals across the lifespan who are experiencing trauma or sudden illness.
$50 fee.
Prerequisites: 313, 316. 2 credits.

NURS-451  NURSING CARE IN SUDDEN ILLNESS & TRAUMA (LAB)

Clinical experience in providing complex nursing care to individuals across the lifespan who are experiencing trauma or sudden illness. Enrollment limited by clinical space. Corequisite: 450. 1 credit.

NURS-455  NURSING CARE OF CHILDREN, ADULTS AND OLDER ADULTS IWTH ACUTE CONDITIONS

Essential concepts, theories and clinical practice necessary to make sound clinical judgments when providing care to persons with acute conditions and their families. Lecture/Discussion. Fees may apply. Generic Program: Semester 3.
Prerequisites: 355, 365, 375, 395. Corequisites: 425, 435, 445. 3 credits.

NURS-456  LIFESPAN ACUTE ILLNESS CARE

Lifespan approach to essential concepts andknowledge for nursing care management of clientsand their families during acute physical and/ormental illness and episodic events and major lifetransitions. Lecture/discussion. Lab fees mayapply.Accelerated Program: Semester 3.
Prerequisites: 356, 366, 376.Corequisite: 436.4 credits

NURS-461  CLINICAL ETHICS-LAB

Critical thinking about current ethical problems within the context of clinical practice. Includes issues across the lifespan and within a variety of cultures. Corequisites: 460; junior standing. 1 credit.

NURS-480  INDEPENDENT STUDY

For students with advanced standing who want to continue to investigate topics of interest developed in required nursing courses or to study material not specifically addressed in other nursing courses.
Prerequisite: consent of instructor. 1-5 credits.

NURS-490  RN FIRST ASSISTANT

Preparation for experienced perioperative R.N. nurses to utilize nursing clinical judgment in the role of surgical first assistant. Required for clinical preceptorship (separate non-college credit course) and nursing certification as a Surgical First Assistant (by passing a separate national certification exam).
Prerequisites: Current R.N. licensure; two years of operating room experience; recommendation of employer-supervisor; ACLS certification; CNOR certification. 3 credits.

NURS-493  INTRO TO PARISH NURSING

Examination of the components of effective parish nursing. Strategies for health management and wellness promotion based on interrelationship of spiritual, emotional, and physical health. Designed to provide experienced RNs with an overview of practice issues within a faith community.
Prerequisites: Baccalaureate degree in nursing and two consecutive years of nursing practice. 2 credits.

NURS-495  CASE ANALYSIS

Intensive analysis of a case selected from clinical experience in 461. Application of previous work in Health Care Ethics to a single case which raises important ethical issues. Pre/corequisite: 461. 1 credit.

NURS-496  ADULT CRITICAL CARE NURSING

Development of clinical judgment to care for adults within a critical care environment. Focus on the care of clients with multiple life-threatening health problems requiring continuous management. May be repeated for a total of 6 credits.
Prerequisites: 419; BIOL 305; clinical experience in an Adult Health area. Competitive, based on B.S.N. GPA, midterm grade in BIOL 305 and recommendation from NURS 313 and/or 316 clinical instructors. 1-6 credits.

NURS-497  CRITICAL CARE NURSING

Nursing for adults within a critical care environment. Application to clients with multiple life-threatening health problems requiring continuous nursing management. Corequisites: 313, 316. 2 credits.

Philosophy

PHIL-312  FEMINIST ETHICS IN HEALTH CARE (CROSS- LISTED WITH NURS 312)

Exploration of issues and methods in health careethics that have arisen from the influence andperspectives of women. Includes overview offeminist ideology and examination of thefoundations of bioethics in relation to gender andpower.3 credits

PHIL-320  TOPICS IN PHILOSOPHY

Study of a particular subject (such as Philosophyof Religion, Asian Philosophy, Existentialism,Philosophy and Economics, or Values and theEnvironment) or of a period in the history ofphilosophy (such as Medieval or Twentieth Century)May be repeated with different subject.
Prerequisite: for study of a historical period,HIST 120, 121, or consent of instructor.3 credits (UQ)

PHIL-336  ENVIRONMENTAL ETHICS AND HEALTH

Study of environmental ethics and its relation tohealth problems arising from human effects on theenvironment and possible forms of action toameliorate these problems. Analysis of howenvironmental ethics relates to health problemsboth in the U.S. and globally.3 credits

PHIL-363  CLINICAL ETHICS (X-LISTED AS PHIL 363)

See NURS 363.3 credits

PHIL-440  HEALTH CARE ETHICS ACROSS CULTURES

Ethical theory in Western and non-Westerncultures. Examines the basic Western philosophicalapproach to ethics and also non-Western approachessuch as those of India and Hinduism, Buddhism andJapan, Africa and African Americans, and others.Comparisons will be made between the Western andnon-Western approaches.4 credits GP

PHIL-445  ETHICAL THEORY: HISTORY AND APPLICATION

History of Western philosophical ethics andcontemporary developments with application tocases. The nature and use of the "principles ofbiomedical ethics" as theory and in application tohistorical crucial cases.Offered fall. 4 credits.

PHIL-451  PROBLEMS OF HEALTH CARE ETHICS

Examines the nature of ethics and some of theethical issues that arise in the health careprofessions. Issues considered from multipleperspectives using critical reasoning.Offered fall.4 credits

PHIL-452  PROBLEMS IN HEALTH CARE ETHICS SEMINAR

Case study on-line discussion of major health careethical issues. Discussions facilitated by expertswith clinical ethics consultation experience.Interaction with students taking PHIL 451(Problems in Health Care Ethics).Offered fall.1 credit

PHIL-461  CLINICAL ETHICS-LAB (CROSS-LISTED WITH NURS 461)

See NURS 461.1 credit

PHIL-495  CAPSTONE SEMINAR IN HEALTH CARE ETHICS

Synthesis of coursework for certificate programin health care ethics. Research of clinicalprojects in an area of interest in health careethics.
Prerequisites: NURS/PHIL 363; PHIL 440 or 445;PHIL 451.Offered as needed.1 credit

Physics

PHYS-111  GENERAL PHYSICS

Algebra-based introduction to Newtonian mechanics,wave motion, fluidynamics, and thermodynamics.Includes studies of motion, force, energy,gravity, simple harmonic motion, motion of gasesand liquids, thermal energy, and heat flow.Lecture, discussion, and laboratory.
Prerequisite: MATH 150, 161, or equivalent.5 credits

Psychology

PSYC-312  HEALTH PSYCHOLOGY

Psychological aspects of health and disease, themedical setting, patient behavior, stress, andmedical treatment. Pain and pain management,social support, patient cooperation with medicalregimens.
Prerequisite: any of the following - 101, 181,182, 183, 186, 187, 188 or consent of instructor.4 credits.

PSYC-385  PSYCHOLOGY OF ANIMAL ASSISTED THERAPY

Science of the application of therapeutic programsutilizing interspecific relationships in healthcare. Grounding theory within the discipline ofpsychology, explores human-other animalrelationships in the specific context of appliedanimal assisted therapy (AAT), as well as the"human-animal bond" literature, and research.
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.Concurrent enrollment in PSY 040 recommended.Offered January Term or spring.3 credits

Sociology and Anthropology

SOAN-223  CULTURAL ENVIRONMENT OF HEALTH

The relation of health to cultural background, cultural setting, and cultural adaptation. Anthropological knowledge, theory, and observational methods as the means of understanding health behavior and sharpening cognitive and practical skills. 3 credits.

Adult Degree Program Courses

Computer Science

COMP-101  FUNDAMENTALS OF INFORMATION SYSTEMS TEC

Broad overview of computer science. Topics include basic concepts in hardware, operating systems and networks, algorithmic problem solving, introduction to the object-oriented paradigm, and an overview of the social context of computing. No background in computer science is assumed or expected. 3 credits.

COMP-302  SOFTWARE ENGINEERING

Analysis, design, implementation, and testing of a medium- scale software system as a member of a project team. Significant real-world group projects covering all the phases of software development life cycle using high-level automated analysis and design tools. Experience with other important skills such as fact-finding, communications, and project management.
$30 lab fee.
Prerequisite: 250. Offered spring. 5 credits. (MWI)

COMP-382  MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS

Real world applications of information systems concepts. The value and uses of information systems for business operation, management decision making, and strategic advantage.
$20 lab fee.
Prerequisites: 301, MATH 140, 160. 3 credits.

COMP-404  OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT

Methods for managing production and distributionof manufacturing and service systems. Capacitydetermination, operating systems design, operatingprocedures analysis, and control systemsdevelopment.
Prerequisites: BUSN 301, MATH 140, MATH 160.3 credits

COMP-450  DATABASE ADMINISTRATION

Database administration, technology, selectionof database management systems. Practicum in datamodeling and system development in a databaseenvironment. Trends in data management.
$30 labfee.
Prerequisite: 250.3 credits (MWI)

COMP-484  OPERATIONS RESEARCH

Quantitative techniques for managerialdecision-making. Linear programming, markovanalysis, queuing models, network analysis andsimulation.
Prerequisite: 404.3 credits

English

ENGL-303  CHILDREN'S LITERATURE

Literature available in various forms forchildren. Development of skills in theunderstanding as well as the presentation andteaching of the literature.
Prerequisite: completion of INQS 125 or 126 orconsent of instructor.

ENGL-377  FUNDAMENTALS OF RESEARCH WRITING

Fundamentals of research writing. Bibliographicinstruction and practice in writing a substantialresearch paper.3 credits

Environmental Studies

ENVS-305  ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES AND THE PHYSICAL SCIENCE

An application of the physical sciences, principally the earth sciences, to understanding human impact on the earth, including such topics as radioactivity, nuclear power and nuclear waste, hazards from earthquakes, volcanoes, mining and toxic chemical wastes, water pollution, acid rain, the greenhouse effect, desertification, and problems posed by increasing urbanization and intensive agriculture. 3 credits. (NW)

ENVS-307  ISSUES IN SCIENCE: GEORESOURCES

Survey of the various natural resources of Oregon, including surface water, soils, and those resources derived from extractive processes such as mining and drilling. Basic geological processes that generated the resources, the mechanics of extraction and/or utilization, and their overall impact on Northwest environment and economy. Appreciation of the adage, All wealth derives from the earth. 3 credits.

ENVS-308  WATER RESOURCES

Focus on the importance of water, the variety of surface and groundwater sources and the extensive use we make of them in transportation, energy, industry, agriculture and municipalities. Impacts on water resources, including overuse and pollution, along with recent efforts to improve water quality and conservation, will also be considered. 3 credits. (NW)

History

HIST-167  SURVEY OF LATIN AMERICAN HIST

Survey of Latin American history, politics, and culture beginning with an overview of Precolumbian empires and European colonial influences and concentrating on the national period from 1810 to present. Countries and regions include Argentina, Chile, Brazil, Peru, Mexico, Cuba, and Central America, as well as hemispheric diplomacy. 3 credits. (VP or GP)

HIST-257  PACIFIC NORTHWEST HISTORY

The development of the Pacific Northwest. Early exploration and settlements. Institutional growth, urbanization, resource development. The impact of national events and trends upon the region. 3 credits. (VP)

HIST-299  SPECIAL TOPICS IN HISTORY

HIST-302  TOPICS IN EUROPEAN HISTORY

3 credit version of 301. (VP or GP)

HIST-316  HISTORY OF MEXICO

3 credit version of 315 (VP or GP).

HIST-346  EUROPE AND THE WEST SINCE 1939

A guided study course analyzing the political and diplomatic settings of the Second World War, urbanization and the industrial state, modern intellectual trends and contemporary European society. 3 credits. (VP or GP)

HIST-371  RACE AND MINORITY CULTURES IN THE UNITED STATES

Not open to those who have taken HIST 271. 3 credit version of 370. (VP or GP or US)

HIST-376  HISTORY OF SOVIET RUSSIA

Development of political, economic, and social institutions in the U.S.S.R. Nineteenth century antecedents of the revolutionary movement with major attention to the events, developments, critical personalities and policies of the 20th century. 3 credits. (VP or GP)

HIST-490  RESEARCH

An opportunity for students to pursue historical research under the direction of a member of the faculty. 3-5 credits.

Inquiry Seminars

INQS-126  INQUIRY SEMINAR

Satisfies Inquiry Seminar requirement for Divisionof Continuing Education students. Not applicablefor McMinnville campus students.

Interdepartmental Studies

IDST-008  LINFIELD ENTRY COLLOQUIUM

Becoming a successful student in the Adult Degree Program. Orientation to Linfield College program. Focus on academic and personal issues unique to adult re-entry students, with emphasis on the development of coping skills. Must be taken by all ADP students within the first year of class attendance. Graded Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory with no retake permitted. 1 credit.

IDST-250  WRITING THE PORTFOLIO

Instruction for ADP students identifying college level learning acquired in prior life experience and documenting that learning through a portfolio submitted for faculty evaluation. Completion of a learning autobiography and two course challenges (with remaining course challenges written independently).
Prerequisite: INQS 126 or equivalent. 3 credits. (Satisfactory/ Unsatisfactory)

IDST-320  HISTORY OF WESTERN THOUGHT I

Historical perspectives on the contributions that great works of literature and thought have made to our understanding of the world and the place of humankind in it. Great works from ancient and classical Greece and Rome, the Middle Ages, the Renaissance and Reformation, the modern and contemporary world. 3 credits each semester. (UQ or VP or GP)

IDST-321  HISTORY OF WESTERN THOUGHT II

Historical perspectives on the contributions that great works of literature and thought have made to our understanding of the world and the place of humankind in it. Great works from ancient and classical Greece and Rome, the Middle Ages, the Renaissance and Reformation, the modern and contemporary world. 3 credits each semester. (UQ or VP or GP)

IDST-490  ARTS AND HUMANITIES RESEARCH PROJECT

Completion of the project formulated and approved in IDST 485. 3 credits.

Mathematics

MATH-162  FINITE MATHEMATICS AND CALCULUS

A continuation of 161, including logarithmic and exponential functions, and topics in finite mathematics including matrix algebra and linear programming. An introduction to differential calculus and its use in optimization. Applications in business, economics and the social and behavioral sciences. Completion of both 161 and 162 is the equivalent of 160.
Prerequisite: 161 or consent of instructor. 3 credits.

Psychology

PSYC-200  SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY

The individual in a variety of social settings atthe inter-person, intra-group, and inter-grouplevels. Social interaction, attitudes,attributions, aggression, altruism, affiliation,conformity, environment, nonverbal communication.Research, theory, and application.
Prerequisite: 101 or consent of instructor.3 credits.

PSYC-262  PERSPECTIVES ON GENDER

Gender socialization and its institutionalmanifestations in the growth of individuals andcultural alternatives. Does not count toward thepsychology major or minor.Offered through DCE only.4 credits

PSYC-355  LEARNING, MEMORY, AND BEHAVIOR

Human adaption to environmental and socialsituations. Principles and theories of learningand memory.
Prerequisite: 101 or consent of instructor.3 credits

PSYC-360  SEXUALITY: A DEVELOPMENTAL VIEW

Psychological development of an indiviual as asexual being presented from a scientific view.Sexuality, theory, and data in aninterdisciplinary framework ranging from neuro-endocrinology to humanistic psychology.
Prerequisite 101 or consent of instructor.3 credits

PSYC-367  PSYCHOLOGY EAST & WEST

Introduction to cross-cultural issues inpersonality and clinical psychology with emphasison Western and Asian perspectives. Does not counttoward the Psychology major or minor.Offfered through DCE only.4 credits

PSYC-375  THEORIES OF PERSONALITY

Study of human personality includingpsychoanalytic and other depth perspectives aswell as existential-phenomenological, behavioral,cognitive, and other approaches.
Prerequisite: 101 or consent of instructor.3 credits

PSYC-391  ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY

Clinical psychology and the study of dysfunctionalbehavior, with emphasis on theoretical issues andresearch, assessment, and strategies of treatmentintervention.
Prerequisite: 101 or consent of instructor.3 credits.

Religious Studies

RELS-304  RELIGIOUS QUEST II

Aspects of primitive religions, folk religions,and cult movements. Varieties of religiousexperience in East and West, ancient and modern,with special emphasis on secularization, SovietMarxism, and American religious behavior.
Prerequisite or corequisite: 303.3 credits (UQ)

Sociology and Anthropology

SOAN-308  SOCIAL RESEARCH METHODS

For future researchers and consumers of research. Designs for research on social behavior, methodology, quantitative and qualitative data collection and analysis, discipline standards, and ethics of research. Resources for and development of research proposals. 3 credits.

Any Questions? If you are interested in learning more about the curriculum at Linfield, please contact the Office of Admission at (800) 640-2287 or email admission@linfield.edu. An admissions counselor will be happy to answer your questions or put you in touch with a faculty member.