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Pre-Law
John McKeegan, jmckeeg, x2202, Melrose 104

Although there is no formal pre-law curriculum at Linfield (because this is not recommended by law schools), the college offers rigorous academic preparation for legal education. In addition to offering several law-related courses (The Study of Law, Comparative Law, The Judicial Process, and American Civil Rights and Liberties) Linfield pre-law students experience a broad and inclusive liberal arts education. Our graduates who have gone on to law school report that their Linfield experience helped prepare them for law school and that they have a solid basis upon which to undertake the rigorous study of law at the graduate level. 

GUIDELINES FOR FIRST-YEAR STUDENTS: 

FALL SEMESTER:

1-2 courses in potential major/minor interest area

1-2 courses to fulfill Linfield Curriculum

ADVISING INFORMATION:

NOTES:

Linfield students may wish to consider taking some of the following courses to develop skills and learn about the field of law:

BNSS             340       Business Law I

BNSS             440       Business Law II

ECON             210       Principles of Economics

ECON             352       Economics of the Law

MSCM/POLS 337      Mass Media Law and Ethics

PHIL               190       Logic

PHIL               360       Philosophy of Law

PHIL               365       Social & Political Philosophy Classics

POLS              201       American Politics

POLS              225       Study of Law

POLS/RELS  315       Politics and Religion

POLS              320       Law, Rights, and Justice

POLS              335       Topics in Public Policy

TCCA              140       Public Speaking

TCCA              147       Debate Practicum

TCCA              340       Persuasion and Social Influence

TCCA              355       Topics in U.S. Public Address

There is no required major for law school.

Law schools accept majors from all departments.  Students should find a major they enjoy and do well at it.  Overall grade point average (GPA) and academic success are more important parts of the law school application than a particular major.  Law schools are looking for students who excel in intense undergraduate programs, proving that they can be successful in the rigors of law school. 

There is no prerequisite coursework for law school.

Students should plan on taking courses that are challenging and help them to hone writing skills and improve reading comprehension.  They need strong analytical reasoning, problem solving abilities, and oral presentation to succeed in law school.